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Budget Process

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NEWS
January 11, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer and
Introduction of the governor's budget proposal Thursday--something required by the state Constitution by Jan. 10 each year--is the beginning of a lengthy process that is supposed to result in adoption of a budget by July 1, the start of the new fiscal year. Here is a step-by-step guide to the process: January. The proposal is introduced separately in the Senate and Assembly, usually by the chairmen of the Senate Finance Committee and the Assembly Ways and Means Committee. February.
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OPINION
January 12, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
California's fortunes have improved so dramatically in the last two years, it was hard for even Gov. Jerry "Era of Limits" Brown to sound dour about the government's finances when he rolled out his $155-billion budget proposal last week. The tax increases that Brown persuaded voters to approve in November 2012 have not only averted the need to slash more from education and other state programs, they've helped generate a multibillion-dollar surplus. Yet Brown has stuck with the cautious practices that led the state safely to this point, proposing to pay down debt and focus new spending on education rather than trying to undo all the cuts the Legislature made during the downturn.
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NEWS
March 22, 1987 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan rebuked Congress on Saturday for failing to enact appropriations bills in a timely fashion and called for the introduction of "some badly needed order into the budget process." In his weekly radio address to the nation, delivered from his weekend retreat at Camp David, Md., Reagan said he intends to "propose a comprehensive budget process reform" to the Democratic-controlled 100th Congress. Meanwhile, in the Democratic response to Reagan's address, Rep.
OPINION
December 20, 2013 | By Andrew Cockburn
"Whenever a fellow tells me he is bipartisan," said Harry Truman, "I know he is going to vote against me. " The hosannas to bipartisanship accompanying the budget deal passed this week should have served as fair warning to the rest of us that we lost this vote. True, politicians and commentators vied to hail the sacrifices that had been made on both sides of the aisle for the greater cause of "restoring public faith in the budget process" and thereby bolster Congress' poll ratings. In reality, there was one clear winner: the bipartisan defense lobby, a category that does not apparently include wounded veterans, who must give up some of their pensions for the sake of restoring that public faith, not to mention funding the extra $22 billion for defense that will flow inexorably into the pockets of Lockheed (stock already up 55% this year)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Unlike its older neighbors, the 3-year-old city of Calabasas is expected to skate through this year's budget process without having to make painful cuts or scrape for new revenues. City officials expect a $6.6-million spending plan for next fiscal year that is nearly identical to this year's budget, with a surplus of $735,000, according to budget guidelines approved at a special meeting of the City Council Wednesday night.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although deep divisions remain, legislative leaders attempted to speed the state budget process Thursday by pushing Gov. Pete Wilson's proposed $56-billion spending plan for the coming fiscal year into a joint state Senate and Assembly conference committee. In purely procedural votes, the Senate approved its version of the budget on a 30-10 vote, and the Assembly later approved the Senate budget with amendments, returning it to the upper house.
NEWS
December 18, 1988
President Reagan said the nation's deficit could be "ancient history in no time" if the President had more power over the budget process. Reagan, who pledged in his weekly radio address to work on reforming the process after he leaves office next month, again blamed Congress for the nation's deficit-spending habits. "Every dime of deficit spending has been mandated by Congress," Reagan said. In the 1988 fiscal year, which ended Sept. 30, the nation recorded a $155.1-billion deficit.
NEWS
March 25, 1987 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Tired of losing a succession of budget battles to Republican Gov. George Deukmejian and disillusioned with the tedium of months-long committee hearings, Assembly Democrats this year have turned the budget process topsy-turvy and added a dash of showmanship. The strategy is necessary, they contend, to disabuse the public of the false notion of a governor holding at bay his rivals in the Legislature to preserve the state treasury from ruinous overspending.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | Jerry Gillam, Times Staff Writer
A constitutional revision commission would be created to examine and recommend changes in the state's budgetary process under legislation that has been introduced in the Assembly. "The budget was not produced until well after the constitutional deadline last year, and most observers predict the budget will get bogged down again this year," said Assemblyman Phil Isenberg (D-Sacramento), the author of the bill (AB 2398).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2008 | GEORGE SKELTON
Seven weeks past their constitutional deadline for passing a state budget, legislators still are stumbling around. Why? Because they haven't yet done the "Dance of Death." That's the annual ritual in which one budget proposal after another is ceremoniously sacrificed on chamber floors until there's agreement on a single survivor. "Everybody dances around the fire. They throw stuff at us. We throw stuff at them.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2013 | Lisa Mascaro
Congressional budget negotiators reached a hard-fought deal Tuesday aimed at avoiding another government shutdown, agreeing on a plan that would restore some money to programs hit by impending across-the-board cuts but trim spending on federal retirees and raise fees on airline travel. Final passage of the $85-billion package, however, remains uncertain because of rising opposition from tea party lawmakers and influential conservative groups. A House vote, expected this week, will once again test the ability of Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio)
NEWS
December 10, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Congressional negotiators reached a budget deal Tuesday that would end the possibility of another government shutdown for the next two years. But the agreement faced strong opposition from conservative groups that could jeopardize its prospects of passage in the House. "Because of this deal, the budget process can now stop lurching from crisis to crisis," said Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), chairwoman of the Senate Budget Committee. Her Republican counterpart, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.)
OPINION
December 10, 2013 | By Douglas Olin
As Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty Murray (D-Wash.) and House Budget Committee Chairman Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) work toward yet another makeshift budget deal, they should do us all a favor and instead just scrap the congressional budget process. Before 1974, Congress had no formal budget process. In those days, the president would submit an annual budget to Congress. In keeping with our system of checks and balances, it was the duty of congressional authorizing committees to draft legislation to establish, continue or modify federal programs, and the appropriations committees were responsible for reviewing funding needs and appropriate annual amounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO -- Under a provision tucked into budget legislation by the state Senate, the president of the California Public Utilities Commission would be exempt from a proposal intended to prevent commissioners from spending agency-related funds that receive less public oversight.  A dispute over the proposal pits the two houses of the Legislature against each other and threatens to hold up other measures aimed at increasing scrutiny of the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
When a deal was reached on the state budget, Gov. Jerry Brown, Senate leader Darrell Steinberg and Assembly Speaker John A. Pérez gathered in the Capitol to declare victory. Missing from the press conference, says George Skelton in his Thursday column , was a fourth group that made a balanced budget possible. "Let's not forget where most of the credit belongs for a punctual, sensible budget," he writes. "It's with another, oft-maligned group: the California voters. " Two votes played a crucial role in this year's largely smooth budget process.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Jon Healey
This post has been updated, as indicated below. During the last three years of President Obama's first term, Republicans (and a fair number of readers here) blasted congressional Democrats repeatedly for failing to pass a federal budget -- even in 2010, when they still held the majority in both chambers. Now the shoe's on the other foot. The GOP-controlled House and the Democratic-controlled Senate have passed competing versions of a budget resolution for fiscal 2014, marking the first time a budget resolution has even made it to the Senate floor since 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By Chris Megerian and Patrick McGreevy
One day before Gov. Jerry Brown is scheduled to release his updated spending plan, Democrats in the Legislature began lining up empty bills to streamline the budget process. The annual ritual is a reliable source of controversy in the Capitol, with Republicans accusing Democrats of preventing a transparent review of the budget. The Senate approved 37 pieces of blank legislation, and the Assembly approved 34. The votes broke down along party lines. The bills serve as placeholders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2013 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
This post has been updated and corrected. See below for details. SACRAMENTO -- Republican lawmakers are trying to resurrect parts of a failed ballot measure in hopes of increasing transparency in the state budget process. Most of the ideas in the Republican proposal come from Proposition 31, which was pushed by the nonpartisan organization California Forward and rejected by voters in November. "Proposition 31 had too much in it and it offended too many people," Assemblyman Jeff Gorell (R-Camarillo)
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