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Budget Solution

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2009 | GEORGE SKELTON
Stuff's piling up in California's Capitol: "To-Do" lists crammed with issues labeled "Attention Required" and "Decision Needed." But the principal decision-makers -- the governor and legislative leaders, or "Big Five" -- have been immersed in a gigantic deficit hole, agonizing over how to get the state out. They need a solution that can be approved by a two-thirds vote of the Legislature, a Herculean hurdle.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The City Council took some heat this week for agreeing to study Councilman Bernard C. Parks' proposals for additional budget cuts. But with city government at least $100 million in the hole just a few weeks before the mayor's deadline to propose a budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1, and with annual costs continuing to rise faster than revenues, it would be irresponsible not to consider any reasonable option. There is no reason to fear talking about Parks' 22 recommendations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1985
A review of the 1986 budget debate to date: 1. President Reagan sends the budget to Congress in February, ruling out new taxes, cuts in defense spending and reductions in Social Security benefits. It is widely denounced as unworkable. 2. The Republican-controlled Senate Budget Committee rejects most of the President's proposal in a budget rewrite that freezes defense and Social Security cost-of-living increases. 3.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
The good news for the U.S. economy as we enter 2013 is that the election's over. The bad news is that the election's over. What's good about it is that both parties in Washington can shed their preoccupation with the campaign theatrics that dominated our long national voyage from pre-primary jockeying through election day. Yet the most dispiriting thing about the campaign's end is that the economic challenges facing the majority of Americans remain...
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day into the state's latest budget stalemate, a coalition of labor, religious, law enforcement and community groups gathered at the Capitol on Wednesday to deliver this message: better a late budget than a bad one. The groups, including the League of Women Voters, complained that lawmakers have shut out the public and narrowed the debate.
OPINION
June 18, 2011 | Tim Rutten
In April 1519, Hernan Cortes landed near what's now Veracruz, Mexico, and scuttled his ships so that his potentially mutinous troops would have no choice but to follow him into battle against the Aztecs. Gov. Jerry Brown's veto Thursday of a budget passed by his own party's legislative majority has something of the conquistador's either-or bravado. Brown has taken California politics into new territory with the first categorical budget veto since 1922, when the state began requiring a consolidated annual spending plan.
NEWS
July 17, 1992
On the state's 16th day without a budget, here were the key developments in Sacramento: THE PROBLEM Legislators and Gov. Pete Wilson need to bridge a $10.7-billion gap between anticipated revenues and the amount it would take to continue all programs at their current levels, rebuild a reserve for emergencies and erase last year's deficit. Without a budget for the fiscal year that began July 1, the state is out of cash and cannot borrow money to pay its bills.
OPINION
June 3, 2008
Re "Sacred pots tie up taxes," column, May 29 I would like to offer a few points of clarification that went unsaid in George Skelton's column. Taking money away from First 5 would leave many of the families who are most vulnerable to the state's budget cuts without crucial resources. Last year alone, First 5 provided 2.7 million Californians with services that will benefit young children throughout their lifetimes, including health insurance, high-quality preschool, early health screenings and oral healthcare.
OPINION
July 17, 2009
Re "Everybody dropped the ball," Column, July 16 I'm sorry that we weren't able to agree to a budget solution before you returned from your vacation, George. But let me bring you up to speed, because we have made great progress toward an agreement that will do more than solve our current deficit; it will put our state on more solid footing for the future. If I had signed the proposals the Legislature was willing to send me three weeks ago, the only thing it would have accomplished was to delay our budget problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992
It seems inconceivable that the leaders of the state of California are considering dismantling the California State University system. Your coverage in recent days vividly illustrates how desperately we need agreement in Sacramento on a budget solution, not on service cuts. We need a solution that minimizes any cuts to the CSU--in no event more than $100 million. Additionally, we need legislative approval of the proposed 40% student fee increase and of the early retirement incentive legislation, AB 1522.
OPINION
October 18, 2011 | By Kevin de León
California's controller announced last week that the state is $705 million short of its budget projections, which probably will trigger more spending cuts. You or someone close to you will be negatively affected by these dramatic cuts. They will hurt. For some, they will cause irreversible pain. If the triggers are pulled, about $2.5 billion in state investments in healthcare and education will be slashed. Those cuts will include an additional $200 million in higher education as well as $30 million in higher tuition fees.
OPINION
June 18, 2011 | Tim Rutten
In April 1519, Hernan Cortes landed near what's now Veracruz, Mexico, and scuttled his ships so that his potentially mutinous troops would have no choice but to follow him into battle against the Aztecs. Gov. Jerry Brown's veto Thursday of a budget passed by his own party's legislative majority has something of the conquistador's either-or bravado. Brown has taken California politics into new territory with the first categorical budget veto since 1922, when the state began requiring a consolidated annual spending plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2009 | Michael Rothfeld and Patrick McGreevy
After a grueling 20-hour session, California lawmakers approved a budget package Friday that would close most of the state's $26.3-billion deficit with deep, broad cuts to state government. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said he would sign the legislation next week even though the Assembly rejected key provisions that left it short by nearly $1.1 billion. The governor had demanded repeatedly during months of negotiations that lawmakers close the entire deficit.
OPINION
July 17, 2009
Re "Everybody dropped the ball," Column, July 16 I'm sorry that we weren't able to agree to a budget solution before you returned from your vacation, George. But let me bring you up to speed, because we have made great progress toward an agreement that will do more than solve our current deficit; it will put our state on more solid footing for the future. If I had signed the proposals the Legislature was willing to send me three weeks ago, the only thing it would have accomplished was to delay our budget problems.
OPINION
June 19, 2009
Re "Budget panel's choices ensure a fight," June 17 As a small part of the budget solution, a long-overdue tax on oil company extraction and an increase in the tax on sales of tobacco are, once again, met with the Republican mantra that "this is not the time for a tax increase." We heard that same tune during the economic boom. Let's see: A tax on Big Oil and Big Tobacco, or eliminating child healthcare programs, aid to the elderly and libraries? Tough choice? Not for me and many Californians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2009 | Evan Halper and Patrick McGreevy
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and legislative leaders are planning to scale back the state's investment in schools, higher education, public transportation and other programs -- while imposing several temporary tax increases -- to close the $42-billion budget gap projected by the middle of next year. The bipartisan plan was cobbled together in private talks by legislative leaders and presented to rank-and-file lawmakers Wednesday afternoon, according to participants. Votes in the Assembly and state Senate are planned as soon as Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1992
The education community applauds state Sen. Frank Hill and Assemblyman Phil Isenberg for their valiant effort to break the budget deadlock in Sacramento by proposing a compromise budget plan, ("2 Lawmakers Draft Budget Compromise" July 17). However, their plan, which calls for unacceptable cuts in education funding of $1.1 billion, must be perceived as a catalyst for renewed budget negotiations between the governor and the legislative leadership, and not as a budget solution. Although a $1.1-billion cut is less than the governor's call for a staggering $2.3-billion cut, the Legislature and the public must not see this as a "win" for education.
OPINION
October 18, 2011 | By Kevin de León
California's controller announced last week that the state is $705 million short of its budget projections, which probably will trigger more spending cuts. You or someone close to you will be negatively affected by these dramatic cuts. They will hurt. For some, they will cause irreversible pain. If the triggers are pulled, about $2.5 billion in state investments in healthcare and education will be slashed. Those cuts will include an additional $200 million in higher education as well as $30 million in higher tuition fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2009 | GEORGE SKELTON
Stuff's piling up in California's Capitol: "To-Do" lists crammed with issues labeled "Attention Required" and "Decision Needed." But the principal decision-makers -- the governor and legislative leaders, or "Big Five" -- have been immersed in a gigantic deficit hole, agonizing over how to get the state out. They need a solution that can be approved by a two-thirds vote of the Legislature, a Herculean hurdle.
OPINION
June 3, 2008
Re "Sacred pots tie up taxes," column, May 29 I would like to offer a few points of clarification that went unsaid in George Skelton's column. Taking money away from First 5 would leave many of the families who are most vulnerable to the state's budget cuts without crucial resources. Last year alone, First 5 provided 2.7 million Californians with services that will benefit young children throughout their lifetimes, including health insurance, high-quality preschool, early health screenings and oral healthcare.
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