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NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- The Senate voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to approve President Obama's nominee for top White House budget expert, bringing a woman into a top post in an administration that critics say has been dominated by men. Sylvia Mathews Burwell was confirmed as director of the Office of Management and Budget by a vote of 96-0, a quick, bipartisan vote of support by a Senate that has strongly objected to several key White House nominations, including...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
Eric Garcetti dismissed a new proposal by Los Angeles mayoral rival Wendy Greuel to cut office budgets for City Council members and the mayor by 25%, saying such a reduction was inconsequential given the size of Los Angeles' deficit problem. “That's a drop in the bucket,” Garcetti told reporters after a campaign event at a community center in Echo Park. “What we have to be doing is not only leading by example, as we've done, but we need to look at pension reform, healthcare reform, those things that really give us bang for the buck, and most importantly, growing the economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
When a deal was reached on the state budget, Gov. Jerry Brown, Senate leader Darrell Steinberg and Assembly Speaker John A. Pérez gathered in the Capitol to declare victory. Missing from the press conference, says George Skelton in his Thursday column , was a fourth group that made a balanced budget possible. "Let's not forget where most of the credit belongs for a punctual, sensible budget," he writes. "It's with another, oft-maligned group: the California voters. " Two votes played a crucial role in this year's largely smooth budget process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- For much of the year, the debate surrounding the budget has pitted Gov. Jerry Brown against Democrats in the Legislature. But starting this week, there will be a different set of divisions in the Capitol. The Assembly and the Senate are pushing different budget plans that will need to be reconciled in a series of joint hearings scheduled to begin Friday.  Although the differences involve a relatively small part of the budget, they represented divergent views on how California should begin reinvesting in government programs now that deficits have faded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By Chris Megerian and Patrick McGreevy
One day before Gov. Jerry Brown is scheduled to release his updated spending plan, Democrats in the Legislature began lining up empty bills to streamline the budget process. The annual ritual is a reliable source of controversy in the Capitol, with Republicans accusing Democrats of preventing a transparent review of the budget. The Senate approved 37 pieces of blank legislation, and the Assembly approved 34. The votes broke down along party lines. The bills serve as placeholders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday signed the new state budget, which is set to take effect Monday. The $96.3-billion spending plan for the general fund contains much of what Brown sought when he released his initial blueprint in January, including a shift of some school money from wealthy districts to those with large numbers of poor students and English-learners. It also lays the groundwork for more spending on social services, university tuition assistance and mental health care in future years, a priority of the Legislature's leaders.
OPINION
March 13, 2013
New budget proposals this week from influential members of the House Republican and Senate Democratic leadership are the stuff of political caricatures. House Budget Committee Chairman Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), last year's Republican nominee for vice president, reprised the spending-cut talking points from his failed campaign with little change and no apparent irony. Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty Murray (D-Wash.), meanwhile, offered the outlines of a budget that increases taxes and spending, while doing little more than buying time on the entitlement programs at the heart of Washington's long-term problems.
OPINION
May 24, 2012
Re "An L.A. budget, with holes," Editorial, May 18 Since 2009, the city has undertaken unprecedented structural reform while addressing each year's shortfall, including: Requiring employees to contribute 2% to 4% (from zero) of their pay for retiree health benefits, and freezing benefits for employees not contributing. The elimination of nearly 5,000 positions, resulting in the smallest civilian workforce since Tom Bradley was mayor. Pension reform and a 20% salary reduction for new hires.
OPINION
May 15, 2012
Re "State deficit estimate hits $16 billion," May 13 Again we are facing budget shortfalls that need to be made up by more taxes. Is there an end to California's financial crisis? Do we have to go from crisis to crisis with no light at the end of the tunnel? The Greek financial shadow is looming larger because the governor doesn't have the guts to make the changes to get our house in order. No one says, "Enough is enough. " I am glad I am 80 years old, but the future my children and grandchildren will endure frightens me to no end. H.K. Rahlfs Irvine The answer to every government deficit situation: "This means we will have to make cuts far greater than asked for at the beginning of the year in schools, public safety and services.
OPINION
October 18, 2010
State and local governments need money to get through the economic slump, so they're turning to, well, garage sales. The city of Los Angeles is doing so literally, negotiating the long-term lease of parking garages to private operators. And California officials reported Oct. 11 that they had reached a deal to sell the Ronald Reagan State Building and the Junipero Serra Building in downtown Los Angeles, plus nine other buildings in four other cities, to a private real estate partnership.
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