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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A proposal to revamp the way California handles its budget and web of state regulations is running into opposition from politicians, unions and various activists who say it would only worsen Sacramento's dysfunction. The wonky measure, Proposition 31, could have far-reaching effects on state government. California Forward, the nonpartisan organization behind the initiative, says its provisions would increase transparency and accountability in a Capitol not known for either.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
America's nonprofit theaters are feeling a bit better about their finances these days, according to a recent survey conducted by the sector's main national service organization, Theatre Communications Group. But the actors, directors and designers who work in those theaters shouldn't bank on a trickle-down effect boosting their standard of living. Asked to list their top five priorities for the coming year, only 19% of the 206 theaters surveyed by TCG and its partner, the Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1994
Regarding the school bus lights law ("The Danger Presented by Lack of Visibility"): It doesn't seem necessary to propound on this subject with several thousand words for it to be understood. Simply put, educate the children with an unbreakable rule. Remain on the curb until the bus has proceeded at least one-half block or farther before crossing the street--at the green light or designated crosswalk. Also, if it is a hazardous area, employ more crossing guards, budgets or no budgets.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1986
Los Angeles-based Unocal named three new corporate vice presidents: Neal E. Schmale, budgets, planning and economics; Darcel L. Hulse, corporate engineering and construction, and E. William Cole Jr., head of the company's Washington office. Additionally, Claude S. Brinegar, 59, executive vice president-administration, was appointed chief financial officer, replacing Philip Blamey, who retired.
OPINION
July 20, 2011 | By Steven Greenhut
On Memorial Day, a suicidal man waded into San Francisco Bay outside the city of Alameda and stood there for about an hour, neck deep in chilly water, as about 75 bystanders watched. Local police and firefighters were dispatched to the scene after the man's desperate mother called 911, but they refused to help. After the man drowned, the assembled "first responders" also refused to wade into the water to retrieve his body; they left that job for a bystander. The incident sparked widespread outrage in Northern California, and the response by the Fire Department and police only intensified the anger.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1989 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times staff writer
If your salary is good, and pay raises come with regularity, you probably owe it to the county's high cost of housing and low unemployment rate. Those are the factors that cause local companies to fork over better-than-average pay raises to executives. County firms are in the top quarter of U.S. companies in the amount they budget for merit raises--annual performance-based pay increases. A recent study by TPF&C, a worldwide personnel consulting firm, has surveyed budgets for merit raises set aside by 1,500 companies in 25 U.S. regions.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
The holidays are months away, but already consumers are worrying about their budgets. According to a survey by Bigresearch, more than 1 in 3 consumers (36.2%) said they would spend less this holiday season than last year. Just 2.7% of consumers said they would spend more, and 26.1% plan to spend the same. (Other totals: 29.1% say it's too early to know, and 5.8% don't celebrate the season.) Among those planning to spend less, most (69.1%) said they would slash their overall budgets.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1991
Sure, movies cost. But when are we going to stop judging films by their budgets rather than their true merits? There always has been and always will be ego projects in Hollywood. The ill-fated "Ishtar," which when viewed without bias is actually quite entertaining, was sunk not by poor quality but in part by bad press regarding its budget. The public never got a chance to like it or not; it flopped before it even came out. And what of great films with greater budgets that make a great thud?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992
Lee calls $34 million "the average cost to make a movie . . . chump change." Chump change! Even when the outlandish budgets of "Terminator 2" and "Hook" are averaged into the feature film pot, the average cost is closer to $22 million. I am a post-production supervisor. We struggle every day with $8-million to $12-million budgets, which seem to be the norm with all the cost cutting imposed upon us recently. Spike is living in the cream of the business, and he's whining. As long as his movies show a profit, he'll stay in the cream.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2005 | From Reuters
Spanish-language broadcaster Univision Communications Inc. said that first-quarter earnings jumped 41% as advertisers committed more of their budgets to reaching U.S. Latino consumers. Los Angeles-based Univision said quarterly profit outpaced analysts' estimates at $44.5 million, or 13 cents a share, up from $31.6 million, or 9 cents, a year earlier. Revenue grew 23% to $433 million from $352.9 million.
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