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Buena Park Ca Finances

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1997 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The city's water officials are preparing to jump into the technological age with a $1.9-million program to replace thousands of aged meters. About 17,000 residential meters are so old that the city is losing nearly $200,000 per year in revenue, said Loren Tuthill, deputy director of the Public Works Department. Pistons in the meters, which are 20 to 25 years old, tend to slow down in their old age and register less water than is actually used, he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1997 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Finance officials are now forecasting a brighter scenario than first projected for the next fiscal year, prompting City Council members to postpone a ballot measure on whether to raise utility taxes. Previous projections had shown that the deficit could reach $3 million next year, but officials said this week that the city might only be in the hole by $1 million to $1.5 million. That prompted officials to consider asking voters in June to approve a tax increase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1997 | LESLEY WRIGHT
City officials have devised a two-pronged approach to drafting their next budget. They intend to approve one budget based on last year's $38-million spending plan as if the financial life of the city were normal. At the same time, they will also introduce $2 million worth of cuts in city services to fill what they know is a gaping hole in revenue sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Art Brown has been chosen by his colleagues on the City Council to serve as mayor for the coming year. Brown, 59, was elected to the council in 1990, at the onset of the recession in Southern California. For Buena Park, recovery has been slow, with the city facing a budget deficit this fiscal year that officials say could run as high as $2 million. "I seem to get the prize of going into really horrendous times," Brown quipped as took the gavel Monday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
A spending and hiring freeze that would take effect early next year is among solutions city officials are considering in the face of a budget deficit that could reach $2 million. At a workshop this week, City Council members also discussed a proposal that would limit the power of the city manager and other finance officials to control the budget. Councilman Don Griffin, who did not seek reelection this year and will leave his seat Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT BILL BILLITER and JULIE FATE SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Officials in three cities proceeded this week with plans to spend their share of a $100-million state fund set up by the Legislature in January for the Citizens Option for Public Safety program, known as COPS. The windfall was especially welcome in Buena Park, where the Police Department just last month slashed programs to help balance the city's budget. City Council members Monday accepted $169,169 in state funds that Police Chief Richard M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time city officials finished cutting $500,000 from the current year's budget this week, four employees were destined for layoff, three other positions were eliminated and a host of civic programs, including the popular Citizens Police Academy, were history. But the cuts, painful as they were for City Council members to make, will allow the city to adopt a budget Sept. 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
City officials say residents have a clear-cut choice: vote for a higher surcharge on utility bills or cope with cuts in municipal services such as public works projects and police protection. Buena Park is beginning fiscal 1996-97 with a budget deficit, and "this is not a one-time blip, this is a structural problem," Councilman Donald L. Bone said. "There is no easy answer. We either raise revenues or cut costs. Either one will impact residents."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The city will back a partnership of investors with a $1.7-million loan to build an affordable housing complex for seniors. City Council members unanimously agreed Monday to loan the developers redevelopment funds, to be repaid at a 3% interest rate over 40 years. The developers, in turn, have promised to rent all 59 of the apartments at rates affordable to tenants over the age of 62 whose income is below the county median. Those rents will remain affordable for 55 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Faced with a looming budget deficit of up to $3 million over the next few years, city officials have turned to utility fees as a possible solution. Residents will voice their opinions on possible fee hikes at a public hearing and then possibly at the ballot box. The first opportunity will be a hearing scheduled for July 16, when the City Council will vote on whether to put a fee hike on the November ballot.
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