Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBuffy The Vampire Slayer Television Program
IN THE NEWS

Buffy The Vampire Slayer Television Program

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 29, 2006 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
When the obituary is written of the WB network, the cause of death should probably read: complications resulting from "Buffy the Vampire Slayer." Last week, when the money-losing WB and UPN networks announced that they were pulling the plug to form a single new broadcast network, many television veterans traced the roots of the decision back five years, when a fight over the fate of "Buffy" drove what would prove to be a fatal stake through the WB's heart.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 29, 2006 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
When the obituary is written of the WB network, the cause of death should probably read: complications resulting from "Buffy the Vampire Slayer." Last week, when the money-losing WB and UPN networks announced that they were pulling the plug to form a single new broadcast network, many television veterans traced the roots of the decision back five years, when a fight over the fate of "Buffy" drove what would prove to be a fatal stake through the WB's heart.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2003 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
She has spawned a spinoff and imitators, scholarly conferences and books, hundreds of academic papers, thousands of Web sites and millions of hard-core fans. Nonviewers may be baffled why a show that never cracked the top 50 in ratings had such a big cultural impact, but mere numbers could never reflect the intense appeal of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," which ends its glorious seven-year run tonight. "She saved the world a lot."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2004 | Lynn Smith
The Federal Communications Commission has cleared "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Will & Grace" of indecency following complaints about episodes of the shows from two groups, the Parents Television Council and Americans for Decency. Since commissioners overruled their enforcement bureau this year in the controversial Bono decision, they have been taking on more of the rulings themselves, legal advisors said.
NEWS
May 15, 2003 | T.L. Stanley, Special to The Times
For the "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" wrap party, Twentieth Century Fox Television executives threw a bash fit for the glitterati of dedicated demon fighters. Guests were summoned to the minimalist-chic Miauhaus by invites printed on parchment paper, wrapped around pillar candles and hand-sealed with wax. When guests arrived, their first few steps sent them through a graveyard that had been built on-site.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | T.L. STANLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rupert Giles, who has mentored the young demon fighters on "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" for five years, might be staking his own claim to television in another spinoff to the popular series. Anthony Stewart Head, who has played Watcher to Buffy's Slayer since the program began airing on the WB in 1997, could become the star of an hourlong show for the U.K.
NEWS
February 27, 2003 | From Associated Press
Stick a stake in it: "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" is done. After seven years, the series will be over at the end of this season, said its star, Sarah Michelle Gellar. " 'Buffy,' in this incarnation, is over," Gellar told Entertainment Weekly magazine for its March 7 issue. The series will wrap up with a five-part story, which will include the return of slayer and bad girl Faith and Buffy's first love, Angel.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Buffy the Vampire Slayer," a cult hit that helped define the fledgling WB network, is moving to UPN in a deal worth more than $100 million and one that is sure to increase friction between AOL Time Warner-owned WB and News Corp.'s 20th Century Fox Television, which produces the series. UPN has agreed to pay about $2.3 million an episode for the next two seasons, according to sources, exceeding the $1.8-million-an-episode offer WB made during negotiations with Fox.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2004 | Lynn Smith
The Federal Communications Commission has cleared "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Will & Grace" of indecency following complaints about episodes of the shows from two groups, the Parents Television Council and Americans for Decency. Since commissioners overruled their enforcement bureau this year in the controversial Bono decision, they have been taking on more of the rulings themselves, legal advisors said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2001 | EMILY DWASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Say it isn't so. Did the producers of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" really kill off Buffy'smom? Maybe she just looks dead, but is actually hovering in another dimension. Hey, this is Sunnydale, where stranger things have happened. Take the newest addition to the show, Dawn, Buffy's "sister." Portrayed by Michelle Trachtenberg, she appeared out of nowhere this season alongside Buffy's Sarah Michelle Gellar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2004 | William Lobdell, Times Staff Writer
When Buffy the Vampire Slayer died (the second time), the epitaph on her tombstone read "She Saved the World a Lot." The willingness of Buffy, high school cheerleader and demon killer, to lay down her young life so humankind could live echoes the central theme of the New Testament. And for many Buffyologists, that's no coincidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2004 | Karin Miller, Associated Press
It's tough for scholars to be taken seriously when their subject is a TV show about a California blond fighting evil in a high school built on a gateway to hell. Particularly when the title is as campy as "Buffy the Vampire Slayer." But enough professors and writers study the erstwhile comedic drama and its spinoff, "Angel," to hold a deadly serious academic conference here last weekend attracting more than 325 people.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2003 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
She has spawned a spinoff and imitators, scholarly conferences and books, hundreds of academic papers, thousands of Web sites and millions of hard-core fans. Nonviewers may be baffled why a show that never cracked the top 50 in ratings had such a big cultural impact, but mere numbers could never reflect the intense appeal of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," which ends its glorious seven-year run tonight. "She saved the world a lot."
NEWS
May 15, 2003 | T.L. Stanley, Special to The Times
For the "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" wrap party, Twentieth Century Fox Television executives threw a bash fit for the glitterati of dedicated demon fighters. Guests were summoned to the minimalist-chic Miauhaus by invites printed on parchment paper, wrapped around pillar candles and hand-sealed with wax. When guests arrived, their first few steps sent them through a graveyard that had been built on-site.
NEWS
February 27, 2003 | From Associated Press
Stick a stake in it: "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" is done. After seven years, the series will be over at the end of this season, said its star, Sarah Michelle Gellar. " 'Buffy,' in this incarnation, is over," Gellar told Entertainment Weekly magazine for its March 7 issue. The series will wrap up with a five-part story, which will include the return of slayer and bad girl Faith and Buffy's first love, Angel.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2001 | T.L. STANLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David E. Kelley did it with "Ally McBeal" and "The Practice," blending story lines and cast members from the two legal eagle shows for a crossover episode a few years back, even though the former airs on Fox and the latter on ABC. Can the same be done with "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Angel," now that the flagship show and its spinoff will find themselves on different networks come fall?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2001 | T.L. STANLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David E. Kelley did it with "Ally McBeal" and "The Practice," blending story lines and cast members from the two legal eagle shows for a crossover episode a few years back, even though the former airs on Fox and the latter on ABC. Can the same be done with "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Angel," now that the flagship show and its spinoff will find themselves on different networks come fall?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, Joss Whedon said Saturday, "I would like to think that most of my fan base is smart enough to use a remote." It was a moment of understatement in the aftermath of the deal, announced late Friday, that sent Whedon's cult television hit "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" from its familiar surroundings on the WB to UPN.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON and BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Joking that their passion is to develop innovative original programming or obtain shows from the rival WB network, UPN executives unveiled a fall lineup Thursday anchored by its acquisitions of two WB dramas: "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Roswell."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | T.L. STANLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rupert Giles, who has mentored the young demon fighters on "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" for five years, might be staking his own claim to television in another spinoff to the popular series. Anthony Stewart Head, who has played Watcher to Buffy's Slayer since the program began airing on the WB in 1997, could become the star of an hourlong show for the U.K.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|