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Buford Furrow

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1999
Men like Buford Furrow disprove their own theory of "white superiority." ALYSON ROSS Alhambra
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2012 | By Thomas Curwen, Los Angeles Times
Joshua Stepakoff and Mindy Finkelstein belong to a unique club. A fraternity, Stepakoff considers it, and they are called together every time another mass shooting takes place. Virginia Tech. Ft. Hood. Tucson. Seal Beach. Aurora. Clackamas Town Center. So when they saw the pictures of the children, rushing hand in hand, led by parents and police through the parking lot of Sandy Hook Elementary School, they knew that once again they had to reach out to one another. PHOTOS: Shooting at Connecticut school "You hear about Connecticut?"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2012 | By Thomas Curwen, Los Angeles Times
Joshua Stepakoff and Mindy Finkelstein belong to a unique club. A fraternity, Stepakoff considers it, and they are called together every time another mass shooting takes place. Virginia Tech. Ft. Hood. Tucson. Seal Beach. Aurora. Clackamas Town Center. So when they saw the pictures of the children, rushing hand in hand, led by parents and police through the parking lot of Sandy Hook Elementary School, they knew that once again they had to reach out to one another. PHOTOS: Shooting at Connecticut school "You hear about Connecticut?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2005 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way Monday for victims of the 1999 shooting rampage by white supremacist Buford O. Furrow Jr. to sue the companies that made his guns. Without comment, the justices let stand a decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals that said the mother of a Los Angeles letter carrier killed by Furrow and the families of several children wounded by him could sue Glock Inc. and China North Industries, the gun manufacturers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1999
Buford Furrow, the suspected gunman at the North Valley Jewish Community Center in Granada Hills, was on probation for assault, described by his neighbors as a man with a history of mental problems and on the "watch" list of the Southern Poverty Law Center because of his association with Nazi organizations (Aug. 11). How in the world did he accumulate a huge arsenal of firearms and ammunition? He had to buy it somewhere. Was there a proper background check on the man? Is the Southern Poverty Law Center list on the computer?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001
The parents of a boy badly wounded by a white supremacist in the August 1999 shooting rampage at a Jewish community center are suing the nonprofit corporation that owns it for failing to protect the children in its care.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 9-millimeter Glock semiautomatic pistol that white supremacist Buford Furrow Jr. says he used to gun down a letter carrier on a sunny Chatsworth street traveled a cross-country route from the Deep South to the far Northwest, passing through several hands until, ultimately, it came within an accused killer's grasp. The gun's journey illustrated how much of the gun trade is conducted in the United States,through pawnshops, gun dealers, and largely unregulated private owners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors dropped their plan to seek the death penalty against white supremacist Buford O. Furrow Jr. after getting access to voluminous medical records showing that he had tried for a decade to get treatment for homicidal and suicidal urges, U.S. Atty. Alejandro N. Mayorkas said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2003 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
One of the rifles confiscated from Buford O. Furrow Jr. on the day he killed a postal worker and wounded five people at a Los Angeles Jewish community center was sold at the same Tacoma, Wash., gun store linked to the rifle used by the Washington, D.C., snipers, according to a lawyer for Furrow's victims.
OPINION
August 15, 1999 | SALLY SATEL, Sally Satel, a psychiatrist, is a senior associate at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, D.C
When neo-Nazi sympathizer Buford O. Furrow Jr. opened fire on a Jewish day school last Tuesday it seemed fairly straightforward: He had committed a hate crime. But when we learned that Furrow had tried to get psychiatric help, he--and his crime--suddenly became more complicated. He seemed less like Timothy McVeigh--a sane but hate-filled, violent man--and more like Colin Ferguson, the paranoid schizophrenic black man who gunned down white passengers on the Long Island Railroad in 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2003 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
One of the rifles confiscated from Buford O. Furrow Jr. on the day he killed a postal worker and wounded five people at a Los Angeles Jewish community center was sold at the same Tacoma, Wash., gun store linked to the rifle used by the Washington, D.C., snipers, according to a lawyer for Furrow's victims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2002 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gun manufacturers were not responsible for the actions of a white supremacist who killed a Filipino American postal worker after wounding five people at a Jewish community center in 1999, a Los Angeles federal judge ruled Monday. U.S. District Judge Audrey B. Collins dismissed a damage suit brought by the mother of slain letter carrier Joseph S. Ileto and the parents of three children wounded when Buford O. Furrow Jr. sprayed the center with automatic weapons fire on Aug. 10, 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2001 | JEAN GUCCIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Fernando judge is set to decide if the North Valley Jewish Community Center can be sued for failing to protect 5-year-old Benjamin Kadish from a racist gunman who opened fire inside the Granada Hills facility in August 1999, injuring the boy and four others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001
The parents of a boy badly wounded by a white supremacist in the August 1999 shooting rampage at a Jewish community center are suing the nonprofit corporation that owns it for failing to protect the children in its care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In an emotionally wrenching hearing, a Los Angeles federal judge sentenced white supremacist Buford O. Furrow Jr. to five life terms Monday for the 1999 murder of a Filipino American postal worker and a shooting rampage that left five people seriously wounded at a San Fernando Valley Jewish community center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors dropped their plan to seek the death penalty against white supremacist Buford O. Furrow Jr. after getting access to voluminous medical records showing that he had tried for a decade to get treatment for homicidal and suicidal urges, U.S. Atty. Alejandro N. Mayorkas said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In an emotionally wrenching hearing, a Los Angeles federal judge sentenced white supremacist Buford O. Furrow Jr. to five life terms Monday for the 1999 murder of a Filipino American postal worker and a shooting rampage that left five people seriously wounded at a San Fernando Valley Jewish community center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the year since he was arrested and charged with a racially motivated shooting spree, avowed white supremacist Buford O. Furrow Jr. allegedly has threatened to kill his team of public defenders and a fellow inmate he considers to be Satan, federal prosecutors disclosed in court papers. The 38-year-old Furrow is accused of opening fire and wounding five people at a Jewish community center, then gunning down postal worker Joseph S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the year since he was arrested and charged with a racially motivated shooting spree, avowed white supremacist Buford O. Furrow Jr. allegedly has threatened to kill his team of public defenders and a fellow inmate he considers to be Satan, federal prosecutors disclosed in court papers. The 38-year-old Furrow is accused of opening fire and wounding five people at a Jewish community center, then gunning down postal worker Joseph S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moved by an emotional plea from the brother of a mail carrier who was shot to death, allegedly by an avowed white supremacist, the Los Angeles City Council called Wednesday for creation of a statewide human relations commission. Ismael Ileto, a Filipino American whose brother, Joseph, was killed last year while delivering mail in Chatsworth, said his family is still struggling to come to grips with the loss. Buford O. Furrow Jr.
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