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Bugs Bunny

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010 | By Susan King
Tom Schiller, who directed some of the best shorts on the early days of "Saturday Night Live," will appear Thursday night at the American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre for a screening of his 1984 film "Nothing Lasts Forever," which was out of circulation for nearly two decades, as well as several classic "SNL" shorts such as "Don't Look Back in Anger" and "La Dolce Gilda." The Cinematheque's Aero Theatre will offer "Slow Burn: Three Classics by Andrei Tarkovsky," which opens Friday with his best-known film, the 1972 sci-fi epic "Solaris."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Susan King
Linda Jones considered herself "incredibly lucky" to have had a father like Chuck Jones, the Oscar-winning animation director of Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies fame. "He was probably the best father anybody could have," said Linda Jones, an only child. "His father had a difficult time being a father, and he vowed he would never impose that kind of difficulty and challenge on a child. " Her dad, she said, "was pretty much a 9 to 5 guy. He didn't bring his work home with him. " PHOTOS: Behind-the-scenes Classic Hollywood That is until after he would finish one of the riotously funny 300 films he directed in his 60-plus year career starring such animated superstars as Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Pepe Le Pew, Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2010
"Bugs Bunny on Broadway," a summertime family concert classic, is getting an overhaul after nearly 20 years. The popular concert series has been entertaining adults and children since 1990, pairing familiar Looney Tunes characters and classical music chestnuts in irreverent ways. The anthology includes cartoon classics such as "The Rabbit of Seville," "A Corny Concerto" and "What's Opera, Doc?" (The show ran for an extended period on Broadway, hence the title.) In July, the Hollywood Bowl will premiere a new version of the concert titled "Bugs Bunny at the Symphony," which is expected to include seven new cartoons, plus a handful of non- Looney Tunes characters, including Tom and Jerry, the Jetsons and the Flintstones.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2013 | By Martin Miller
Particularly for those of us with children, Los Angeles residents are often left wondering why we live here. The basic costs of living are comically high, public transportation is woefully inadequate, and most public schools can't afford rudimentary arts programs. For all its size and sprawl, the city doesn't have nearly enough parks or public spaces but manages to generate choking traffic and diabolical motorists. And then you take your kids to "Bugs Bunny at the Symphony II" at the Hollywood Bowl featuring the Los Angeles Philharmonic, conducted by George Daugherty, and you realize, oh, yes, this is why we live in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2010 | By Saul Austerlitz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Some cinematic rules are iron-clad: The man in the white hat wins the shootout, brunets are smarter than blonds, and Bugs Bunny always, always emerges triumphant. No matter the circumstances, no matter the opponent, Bugs is unruffled, chomping on his ever-present carrot like a cigar, another bon mot at the ready. As Chuck Jones observed of his most famous creation, "We are all of us Daffy, Elmer and Wile E. Coyote. We just wish we were Bugs. " Now, two new DVD collections of Bugs' best work, "Bugs Bunny: Hare Extraordinaire" and "The Essential Bugs Bunny," have been issued by Warner Home Video to remind viewers ?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
Warner Bros., where Bugs Bunny was born in 1940, understood the power of music. The studio's Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoon series avidly used music from Wagner, Rossini and Brahms, showed Bugs Bunny as an orchestra conductor, ballet dancer and an opera singer, and sometimes offered parodies of noted operas. A few years after Looney Tunes' inception in 1930 and Merrie Melodies' a year later, Warner Bros. brought on composer Carl Stalling as a staff member to set the animation to music.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2013 | By Martin Miller
Particularly for those of us with children, Los Angeles residents are often left wondering why we live here. The basic costs of living are comically high, public transportation is woefully inadequate, and most public schools can't afford rudimentary arts programs. For all its size and sprawl, the city doesn't have nearly enough parks or public spaces but manages to generate choking traffic and diabolical motorists. And then you take your kids to "Bugs Bunny at the Symphony II" at the Hollywood Bowl featuring the Los Angeles Philharmonic, conducted by George Daugherty, and you realize, oh, yes, this is why we live in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1989
Mel Blanc, the voice behind Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, the Road Runner's "Beep!" and Woody Woodpecker's laugh, was in serious condition Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, a spokesman said. Blanc, 81, was suffering from several medical conditions, including a heart problem, said hospital spokesman Ron Wise. His condition has remained unchanged for a week. He entered the hospital May 19.
NEWS
November 15, 1990
Bugs Bunny, celebrating his 50th birthday, has been selected grand marshal of the 41st Annual "The Fabulous Holiday--Christmas Lane Parade" to be presented at 1 p.m. Sunday. The parade also will feature co-teen marshals Brian Green of "Beverly Hills 90210" and Christie Clark of "Days of Our Lives." Some of the other celebrities appearing will include Iron Eyes Cody, Alizath Wiener of "My Two Dads," Billy Barty, Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Albert Law Stoffel, 92, whose writing included Golden Books for children and the Bugs Bunny comic strip, died May 6 in Santa Monica of unspecified causes. Born in Racine, Wis., Stoffel studied journalism at the University of Kentucky and worked as a newspaper reporter and photographer. He spent a year in Italy writing publicity for Rome's Excelsior Hotel. Stoffel served in the Navy during World War II and then spent the next 30 years as editor and manager of Western Publishing Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
Warner Bros., where Bugs Bunny was born in 1940, understood the power of music. The studio's Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoon series avidly used music from Wagner, Rossini and Brahms, showed Bugs Bunny as an orchestra conductor, ballet dancer and an opera singer, and sometimes offered parodies of noted operas. A few years after Looney Tunes' inception in 1930 and Merrie Melodies' a year later, Warner Bros. brought on composer Carl Stalling as a staff member to set the animation to music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Disney's frenetic live-action/animated comedy "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" was the second-highest-grossing film of 1988, earning more than $156 million. The comedy won three Academy Awards and transformed its lead, British actor Bob Hoskins, into a bona fide Hollywood star. But more importantly, the film marked the first time beloved animated characters from rival studios - such as Disney's Mickey Mouse and Warner Bros.' Bugs Bunny - appeared together. The traditionally hand-drawn animated film heralded a renewed appreciation of the Golden Age of animation and spawned the modern-era of animation, especially at Disney.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2011 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
Pity the poor cartoon character. Unable to speak for himself against those who would redraw or rewrite him, he is the slave and plaything of whomever owns the copyright. The human fan can only watch or not and note that in most cases the better work is not usually the latest, and that theatrical versions of old cartoons are almost invariably superior to their television revivals. But revivals there will be. "The Looney Tunes Show," which debuts Tuesday night on CN, at the big-kid-but-not-little-kid-friendly hour of 8 p.m., is the latest attempt to do something new with the Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
With this being the Chinese Year of the Rabbit, and with "Hop," Russell Brand's tribute to the Easter Bunny, out this weekend, it felt like the right time to get a little hopped up ourselves. Bunnies have long been a favorite subject of writers — think Beatrix Potter and Lewis Carroll — and don't forget American folklore's Br'er Rabbit of the Uncle Remus stories. They've had an impact on the big screen as well. So, while Brand romps across theaters as E.B., the son of the Easter Bunny who doesn't want to follow in his father's paw prints, we take a look at some of the most memorable rabbits in movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2010 | By Saul Austerlitz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Some cinematic rules are iron-clad: The man in the white hat wins the shootout, brunets are smarter than blonds, and Bugs Bunny always, always emerges triumphant. No matter the circumstances, no matter the opponent, Bugs is unruffled, chomping on his ever-present carrot like a cigar, another bon mot at the ready. As Chuck Jones observed of his most famous creation, "We are all of us Daffy, Elmer and Wile E. Coyote. We just wish we were Bugs. " Now, two new DVD collections of Bugs' best work, "Bugs Bunny: Hare Extraordinaire" and "The Essential Bugs Bunny," have been issued by Warner Home Video to remind viewers ?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2010
Who: 'Bugs Bunny at the Symphony' Where: 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood When: 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday Price: $10-$120 Contact: (323) 850-2000, http://www.hollywoodbowl.com
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly writes about film for The Times Orange County Edition.
Chuck Jones was often asked to explain the popularity of Bugs Bunny, his most enduring creation. Jones said it was simple, really--people like Bugs because he has the kind of personality they'd like to have. He was right, of course. People with even the slightest bit of vinegar in their hearts have to enjoy Bugs; he's one fast-talking, slip-sliding bunny who knows how to make the best of a bad situation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2010 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bugs Bunny will return to the Hollywood Bowl this week to help carry on two traditions — a tribute to Looney Tunes and other classic cartoons and the Bowl's efforts to showcase movie music and the artists who create it. The Bowl has long been a gateway and gathering place for Hollywood, says Arvind Manocha, chief operating officer of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn. "So it's natural that we want to celebrate the music of Hollywood by hearing it performed live while watching the movies for which it was written."
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