Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBuilding Industry Suits
IN THE NEWS

Building Industry Suits

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 21, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three housing developers filed a $10-million suit against the Irvine Co., charging fraud and negligence regarding a Tustin property on which the developers were trying to build 55 single-family homes in 1990. Filed in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana Tuesday, the suit accuses the Irvine Co. of failing to disclose environmental and legal problems impacting the Tustin Ranch property. The suit was filed by San Remo, an Irvine partnership, Cameo Homes in Newport Beach, Glencrest Inc.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A group of 91 homeowners won a $4-million settlement Friday in a lawsuit alleging shoddy workmanship during construction of their homes. The plaintiffs alleged that J.M. Peters Co. and its parent, Capital Pacific Holdings of Newport Beach, used faulty construction methods for the $500,000 single-family homes at the Huntington Place development near Bushard Street and Atlanta Avenue. "The homes had leaky windows, leaky wooden decks, cracked stucco and also structural problems," said Thomas E.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 17, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Diego jury ordered Shell Chemical Co. and two other companies to pay almost $50 million in punitive damages to homeowners and a developer for water damage caused by faulty plumbing pipe that the companies manufactured. The class-action lawsuit was brought by 41 San Diego homeowners and the builder of the Briarwood Pointe project against Shell Chemical Co., the U.S. Brass unit of Eljer Industries Inc. and Hoechst Celanese Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge sent a landmark six-year case between construction giant Tutor-Saliba Corp. and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to a jury Thursday after finding the contractor liable for more than 1,000 acts of business misconduct on the Metro Rail subway project.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1998 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To most observers, Southern California's growing need for housing should create an ample market for new condominiums. Rising land costs are pushing single-family homes out of the reach of many would-be buyers at the same time that low mortgage rates make mortgages affordable. At a similar point in the last real estate boom, many buyers opted for new condos. This time around, they don't have that option.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1993 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beleaguered William Lyon Co., in debt to several of its banks and red-faced over a recent $8.7-million settlement in a faulty construction lawsuit, faces a bigger embarrassment next month as a $20-million suit alleging poor construction of a large Stanton condominium complex goes to trial. The negligence suit by the Crosspointe Village Condominium Home Owners Assn.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1995 | ANDREA ADELSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Henry Nahoum severed his East Coast ties in 1990 as a dental professor at Columbia University and retired to Orange County to be near his grandchildren. South County was then at the tail end of a huge building boom; new homes were selling faster than builders could frame them. With only a model to judge, Nahoum put much of his nest egg down on a $600,000 home to be built amid the rolling hills of Nellie Gail Ranch, an exclusive neighborhood with an equestrian bent.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1998 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling that is expected to reduce the amount of money that homeowners can collect for construction defects, a state appellate court has determined that builders can be sued for damages only if the home shows physical signs of decay. Previously, homeowners have collected jury awards and settlements, sometimes for millions of dollars, after showing that their homes were not built according to plans, regardless of whether those changes resulted in defects.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1992 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Lyon Co. and more than a dozen of its subcontractors have agreed to pay $8.7 million in damages to a Lake Forest condominium development's homeowners association to settle a massive construction-defects lawsuit. The settlement, which represents one of the largest such awards against an Orange County home builder, tarnishes the image of one of the nation's largest residential developers at a time when it is struggling to rearrange a staggering debt load.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2000 | ALEX KATZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Homeowners in a downtown Santa Ana low-income condominium complex have sued the project's developers, alleging that shoddy construction has led to water damage and health problems for several residents. Residents of the Spectrum Condominiums have complained for years about collapsing roofs, faulty plumbing, flooding and electrical hazards.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1999 | (Edmund Sanders)
Homeowners at the 159-unit Huntington Bayshore Condominium Assn. will split a $6.8-million settlement from a construction defect lawsuit, the association's attorney said. The Huntington Beach group had sued developer Newcomb Development and subcontractors, alleging that the 8-year-old project suffered from leaky roofs, stucco problems and electrical malfunctions, according to Ross Feinberg, the Newport Beach attorney who represented homeowners.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1999 | Greg Hernandez
A condominium association on Wednesday reached a $1.5-million settlement with the developer of a 72-unit Coto de Caza complex that sustained damage during last year's El Nino driven storms. The settlement, which amounts to more than $21,500 per home, was finalized after a brief hearing in Orange County Superior Court. The suit was filed 17 months ago against Gfeller/Coto Venture developers as well as Gfeller Development Co. Members of the Fairway Oaks Condominium Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' Hyperion Waste Water Treatment Plant, once a major polluter of Santa Monica Bay, is now a gleaming model of environmental protection. But beneath the hoopla surrounding that $1.6-billion transformation are a host of costly mistakes that have already bankrupted some of the project's contractors and may eventually cost city residents $100 million more.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1998 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To most observers, Southern California's growing need for housing should create an ample market for new condominiums. Rising land costs are pushing single-family homes out of the reach of many would-be buyers at the same time that low mortgage rates make mortgages affordable. At a similar point in the last real estate boom, many buyers opted for new condos. This time around, they don't have that option.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1998 | Daryl Strickland
In what may be the largest total settlement for a construction-defect case, Glendale Federal Bank agreed to pay $18.75 million for its role in the development of a 267-unit condominium project in San Juan Capistrano. The deal comes four months after the Mesa Vista North Townhomes Owners Assn. was paid $7.29 million by Orange-based CCL Realty Inc., builders of 57 of the units, and a month after an Anaheim subcontractor, CDR Concrete, agreed to pay $500,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sixth group of homeowners--those in undamaged homes at the bottom of a hill that collapsed in March--filed suit Wednesday against the developers and builders of homes on the hilltop. Meanwhile, the owners of condominiums that were damaged or destroyed at the bottom of the hill demanded $15 million from developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1993 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The homeowners at the Tobias Chateaux condominiums in Panorama City, in the midst of suing the developer for what they say is shoddy construction, thought things couldn't get much worse. But things did get worse this week, thanks to the weather and the city bureaucracy. As a historic deluge was flooding their garages and forcing water through cracks around their windows, the homeowners also were being notified by the Los Angeles Building Department that their 2-year-old homes are defective.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1998 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling that is expected to reduce the amount of money that homeowners can collect for construction defects, a state appellate court has determined that builders can be sued for damages only if the home shows physical signs of decay. Previously, homeowners have collected jury awards and settlements, sometimes for millions of dollars, after showing that their homes were not built according to plans, regardless of whether those changes resulted in defects.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|