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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After simulating the most powerful earthquake California is ever expected to face, UC San Diego researchers say buildings can be constructed to withstand the Big One with minimal damage. Scientists at the Charles Lee Powell Structural Systems Laboratory on Thursday announced the results of the first, full-scale test for earthquake resistance on a specially designed five-story building on campus. Hairline cracks spread through the building.
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HOME & GARDEN
November 24, 1990 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It started with the best of intentions. In the housing boom after World War II, homes were air-conditioned for comfort, closing the windows in the process. After the energy crisis of the 1970s, houses were made energy-efficient, producing a new array of insulations, paints, sealants, caulks and adhesives to do the job. American houses were becoming as snug as a submarine. They were also becoming polluted. Even poisonous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1994 | TIM MAY
Out of those ubiquitous roadside heaps of rubble and rubbish--the castoffs and detritus of the Northridge earthquake--homes for the needy are being rebuilt, thanks to Habitat for Humanity and an Agoura Hills construction company. Western Builders Group Inc.
WORLD
October 20, 2004 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
The cost of building materials in Iraq has soared as much as tenfold amid fears of shortages, threatening the pace of the already troubled U.S. reconstruction effort, Iraqi and U.S. officials said Tuesday. Local suppliers have jacked up the prices of such basics as lumber, gravel and bricks in the expectation that a U.S.-funded building boom is poised to take off and will drain stocks of the materials, the officials said.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1995 | Ron Galperin, Ron Galperin is an attorney with Wolf, Rifkin & Shapiro in West Los Angeles
On evenings and weekends, you can find most of the Plaisted family hard at work--carrying rocks, operating heavy equipment, digging holes and other tasks toward the building of their home in Kagel Canyon near Sylmar. Robert and Janell Plaisted--like most Angelenos--couldn't afford to hire a builder to construct the house in which they really wanted to live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1995 | LISA M. BOWMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Green Meadow wildfire razed the Newbury Park mansion of Harman Rasnow, the millionaire vowed to build a new house that would never burn. When the Northridge earthquake leveled the tiny Fillmore home of Joe and Dolores Rivera, the couple asked Habitat for Humanity to construct them a house that would withstand the strongest quake.
REAL ESTATE
January 30, 2005 | Jeff Bertolucci, Special to The Times
A painting contractor by trade, Don Dellino knows a lot more about residential remodeling than your average homeowner. But even he was startled by the recent run-up in construction costs due in large part to soaring prices of building materials. Dellino and his wife are expanding their two-bedroom Manhattan Beach home into a 3,900-square-foot Italian-style villa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1996 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mandatory inspection of nearly 300 buildings for steel frame damage has slowed to a trickle, with more than 40% still not in compliance months after deadlines expired, city records show. Damage ranging from minor cracks to potentially life-threatening failures affecting hundreds of joints has been found in nearly two-thirds of the buildings inspected since the January 1994 Northridge earthquake.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is impossible to tell looking up from the street, but one of the twin Trillium office towers in Woodland Hills' Warner Center leans about five inches to one side. The Northridge earthquake shook the 17-story steel-frame building out of plumb, and several weeks of work last spring failed to straighten it. "It won't go back," said manager Robert Benton. Unnerved by the flaw, some tenants hired their own structural engineer and temporarily moved out.
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