Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBuildings
IN THE NEWS

Buildings

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty, according to records and interviews. An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Kevon Seymour finished the 2013 season in style. The USC cornerback was selected defensive player of the game in the Las Vegas Bowl after deflecting a pass and making seven tackles in the Trojans' rout of Fresno State. The 6-foot, 175-pound junior from Pasadena built on the performance during the off-season and has been playing with a veteran confidence throughout spring practice. Seymour started on the left side last season, but with senior Josh Shaw sidelined while recovering from a stress fracture he also has played on the right.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1995 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The world will turn in Leisure World for the first time since 1972 when a major renovation of the retirement community's landmark globe is completed. Standing on a grassy knoll 32 feet above the busy Interstate 5 near El Toro Road, the giant metal orb has been a South County curiosity for more than 30 years--except at night. A target for vandals, a bank of floodlights illuminating the globe has been systematically shattered in recent years.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
The "Heartbleed" software flaw that triggered alarm bells around the world could fundamentally undermine two decades' worth of efforts to persuade consumers they could trust the Web to securely handle such tasks as buying a pair of shoes and applying for a job. The discovery of a gaping hole in a piece of software that was supposed to protect personal information from hackers left websites rushing to fix the bug while consumers struggled to understand...
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Jon Healey
In my previous post, I described the potential for a new era of automated manufacturing in which it's easier for entrepreneurs to create products but harder for workers to find jobs on the assembly line. A contrary note was sounded, ironically, by a robotics executive, who insisted that the next generation of smart machines would make human employees more valuable, not more dispensable. The executive, Rethink Robotics' Rodney Brooks, didn't offer any concrete examples to support his argument.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
Newport Beach, one of Southern California's most affluent cities, is about to transform an industrial area near John Wayne Airport into a distinctly urban community of homes and shops. Uptown Newport Village will replace a pair of aging industrial buildings on 25 acres near the airport with a walkable neighborhood of shops, restaurants, parks and upscale homes and apartments, according to Shopoff Group, an Irvine developer. Mayor Rush N. Hill, who is an architect, said he is excited about the project and pleased that it will be a dense neighborhood by local standards.
TRAVEL
June 1, 2011 | By Gary Robertson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When you think of Las Vegas, you probably don't think of Las Vegas, N.M. It's the other Las Vegas, and perhaps the wildest Wild West town you've never heard of. I had never heard of Las Vegas, N.M., when I first encountered it in 1997 - a Western boomtown, frozen in time, with eye-popping architecture and more than 900 buildings on the state and National Register of Historic Places. I returned again in the fall of 2010 on my honeymoon, remarried after being single nearly 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2011
Love Goes to Buildings on Fire Five Years in New York That Changed Music Forever Will Hermes Faber and Faber: 369 pp., $30
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
A couple of major ironies are folded into the title of the big new architecture exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA. " The first irony is that the title itself rings with echoes of architectural history. In 1980, when Paolo Portoghesi curated the first Venice Architecture Biennale, he called his show "The Presence of the Past," and he used it to explore the rising interest in history and ornament among the talented emerging architects of the day, including Frank Gehry and Arata Isozaki.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
Amid the vast sea of office buildings and industrial plants just south of Los Angeles International Airport, a new office campus is emerging with a 21st century look starkly distinct from its baby boom-era neighbors. While most of Southern California's office market remains stuck in neutral as businesses decline to expand, developers in El Segundo are about to risk millions of dollars building the offices. In contrast to its more monolithic neighbors, the new complex will have 15 office buildings of widely varying sizes and shapes intended to appeal to firms in the few sectors that are expanding, such as technology and entertainment.
WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Heavily armed separatists held Ukrainian government buildings and hostages Tuesday as tensions increased sharply and threatened to push a dispute over treatment of the country's ethnic Russians into bloodshed. Ukrainian government officials said pro-Russia separatists had rigged explosives in a building in Luhansk and were holding hostages inside. Officials dispatched a deputy prime minister to another city, Donetsk, to try to negotiate a peaceful solution to the takeover of an administration building in that mining city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By David Zahniser
A veteran Los Angeles building inspector sentenced last month to prison in an FBI corruption case will continue to receive a yearly pension of more than $72,000, according to a high-level retirement official. Samuel In, 66, pleaded guilty last year, admitting as part of a plea agreement that he took more than $30,000 in bribes while working as a senior inspector. He was sentenced last month to 2 1/2 years in prison after a federal prosecutor argued against leniency, mentioning his "substantial" pension.
SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | By Dylan Hernandez
While the Dodgers were preparing to open a two-game series against the Detroit Tigers, Brian Wilson was at a minor league game. Wilson is fine with that. The Dodgers' bearded $10-million setup man is looking ahead. “I was signed for multiple reasons. For clubhouse, leadership, certain advice to certain pitchers, but most of all I was signed so I could play in October,” he said. “That's what this team was built for. That's the whole reason they signed me last year. It's the exact reason why they signed me this year.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2014 | Alan Zarembo
In a windowless cinder-block room at Ft. Hood on Wednesday morning, 11 soldiers closed their eyes and practiced taking deep, slow breaths. The technique is useful for gaining self-control in stressful situations, explained their instructor. In the course of the day, the students would practice escaping a wrestling hold while being taunted by fellow soldiers. They would balance a dime on the end of an M16 rifle. They would watch a clip from the movie "Talladega Nights" in which Will Ferrell tries to get into a car with a cougar in the front seat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes and Tim Logan
Dozens of people shared only three showers in the building that Patricia McDowell called home for the last 2 1/2 years. Roaches skittered across the floor, she said, and lights went out and stayed out. In recent months, McDowell said she had to run an extension cord to another room to keep electricity going. But when the Los Angeles Fire Department told McDowell and dozens of other tenants that they had to clear out of the building at 5700 S. Hoover St., citing dangerous conditions, she panicked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes and Tim Logan
Dozens of tenants are being forced to vacate a South Los Angeles building amid complaints that the city should have acted sooner to help people relocate from the squalid and dangerous apartments. In recent years, the Hoover Street commercial building was converted into dozens of apartments, prompting a complaint to the city six months ago. But when the city ultimately forced the building to be vacated, its tenants were given little time to leave. A Los Angeles Fire Department order said they had to be out by Friday, citing "unsafe buildings" and "structural hazards.
WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - After years of building massive and lavish new government office buildings - including ones inspired by the White House, Versailles and the U.S. Capitol - China is saying enough is enough. Central authorities have issued a five-year moratorium on the construction of new government offices, training centers and hotels, the latest step in a frugality drive that also includes cutbacks on banquets, travel and other perks for bureaucrats. According to the State Council, China's cabinet, the new policy issued late Tuesday is important for “building a clean government and … maintaining the image of the Communist Party.
WORLD
June 15, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - A powerful two-punch earthquake shook western Mexico early Sunday, knocking out electricity and cellular phone service in parts of this sprawling capital. There were no immediate reports of serious damage or fatalities. Initial readings put the quake at a magnitude of 5.9 at around 12:30 a.m., with the epicenter about 90 miles south of Mexico City in the northern part of Guerrero state, where Acapulco is located. It was felt with marked strength in Mexico City, swaying major apartment buildings, hotels and skyscrapers.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
From some classic Adirondack chairs in front of his colorful new office complex near Marina del Rey, commercial landlord Ned Fox can sit back and watch his property value go up. The developer who made his bones building skyscrapers in downtown Los Angeles during the late 1980s and early 1990s today finds himself with a close-up view of the rapidly evolving planned community of Playa Vista and the young tech and entertainment workers transforming the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | Steve Lopez
I'm generally not an alarmist about earthquakes. As a California native, I've experienced my share of small to moderate reminders that our fair state is fractured from head to toe and we're all standing on broken plates. But the shaking is putting me on edge lately. I find myself wondering if I should buy earthquake insurance, or why my dog is cocking his head as if he knows something I don't. This is partly because there's been more rocking and rolling than usual, and partly because of what we're learning about how shamefully unprepared we are for a Big One. And now I have more cause for concern.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|