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NEWS
October 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
Officials in earthquake-prone California have won their fight--at least for now--against federal legislation that would require hazard insurance for all public buildings. Despite Senate support for the requirement, the House removed it late Tuesday after vigorous opposition from the state's entire 52-member congressional delegation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
The abrupt rattle and jolt was so disconcerting that Kelly Shaw decided never again to use the elevator to get to her geology classes in McCarthy Hall on the Cal State Fullerton campus. But the escalator in the 50-year-old, six-story natural sciences and math building presents its own challenges: It is prone to breaking down and replacement parts are hard to locate. At certain times of the day, Shaw said, hundreds of students wait in a line that stretches outside the building to get on the escalator, which goes only as high as the fourth floor.
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NEWS
February 6, 1988 | CHRIS CHRISTENSEN
If you plan a quick jaunt to an accessible lighthouse near you, or a tour of many, here are a few along the Pacific Coast. Even if you head out when skies are clear, be prepared for bitter winds and rain in winter, wear sturdy, comfortable shoes and take along binoculars. Restored to its original appearance as a tourist attraction, the old Point Loma Lighthouse is the focal point of the Cabrillo National Monument on Point Loma in San Diego. "The last lighthouse keeper was Capt.
OPINION
April 23, 2013
Re "Bullet train bid rules altered," April 19 Thanks to The Times for letting us know that a troubled bid led by Sylmar-based Tutor Perini might win the contract to build the first phase of California's high-speed rail system against much more experienced contractors. A nyone who has taken Spain's high-speed train knows how superb these machines are, and two companies with extensive high-speed rail experience in Spain (Ferrovial and Acciona) also submitted bids. But our High-Speed Rail Authority rewrites rules, plays with our safety and might entrust this project to a firm that has been troubled by lawsuits and bids that were way off interim and final costs.
OPINION
April 23, 2013
Re "Bullet train bid rules altered," April 19 Thanks to The Times for letting us know that a troubled bid led by Sylmar-based Tutor Perini might win the contract to build the first phase of California's high-speed rail system against much more experienced contractors. A nyone who has taken Spain's high-speed train knows how superb these machines are, and two companies with extensive high-speed rail experience in Spain (Ferrovial and Acciona) also submitted bids. But our High-Speed Rail Authority rewrites rules, plays with our safety and might entrust this project to a firm that has been troubled by lawsuits and bids that were way off interim and final costs.
FOOD
June 23, 1994 | KITTY MORSE
There once was a time when abalone, this most succulent of shellfish, was plentiful along the Pacific Coast of North America. Within barely a generation, however, the delicate mollusk and its distinctive ear-shaped shell has become a rarity in the wild, a victim of gastronomic overkill. Experts have several explanations for this unfortunate depletion. The main reasons include overfishing and illegal gathering of undersized abalones.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Internet retailer Amazon.com -- after years of avoiding having any physical presence in California -- is planning to open a third massive distribution center in the Golden State. The new operation is in Tracy, a distant bedroom community for the San Francisco Bay Area south of Sacramento. The facility will be only about 30 miles from a second Amazon center being built in Patterson to the south. Last month, the Seattle company cut the ribbon on a 950,000-square-foot facility in the city of San Bernardino, which started filling orders before the holiday shopping season.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Equity Office Properties Trust, the largest owner of U.S. office buildings, said Monday that it had sold 29 industrial buildings -- all of them in California -- to Deutsche Bank's RREEF unit for about $210.3 million in cash and real estate. The purchase price includes $73.3 million in cash and the transfer of five office buildings in suburban Chicago and in Orange County to Equity Office.
OPINION
July 16, 1989 | JOHN MUELLER, John Mueller grew up in Los Angeles, attended the University of Chicago, received his graduate education at UCLA, and now teaches at the University of Rochester (which, while doing well at attracting students, would be happy to have more Californians)
Demographics are creating an absurdity for higher education. In much of the country--particularly the Northeast and Midwest--the number of high school graduates is declining. As a result, colleges and universities there are experiencing reduced enrollments and in some cases are going out of business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2004 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
A state law that requires California's 25,550 unreinforced masonry buildings to display placards warning that a major earthquake could damage them is being largely ignored, according to state records. The masonry buildings have long been considered by seismologists to be the most sensitive to earthquake damage, a point bolstered by December's 6.5-magnitude temblor in Paso Robles in which two people died when an unreinforced structure collapsed on them.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Internet retailer Amazon.com -- after years of avoiding having any physical presence in California -- is planning to open a third massive distribution center in the Golden State. The new operation is in Tracy, a distant bedroom community for the San Francisco Bay Area south of Sacramento. The facility will be only about 30 miles from a second Amazon center being built in Patterson to the south. Last month, the Seattle company cut the ribbon on a 950,000-square-foot facility in the city of San Bernardino, which started filling orders before the holiday shopping season.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Equity Office Properties Trust, the largest owner of U.S. office buildings, said Monday that it had sold 29 industrial buildings -- all of them in California -- to Deutsche Bank's RREEF unit for about $210.3 million in cash and real estate. The purchase price includes $73.3 million in cash and the transfer of five office buildings in suburban Chicago and in Orange County to Equity Office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2004 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
A state law that requires California's 25,550 unreinforced masonry buildings to display placards warning that a major earthquake could damage them is being largely ignored, according to state records. The masonry buildings have long been considered by seismologists to be the most sensitive to earthquake damage, a point bolstered by December's 6.5-magnitude temblor in Paso Robles in which two people died when an unreinforced structure collapsed on them.
REAL ESTATE
September 28, 2003 | Julie Bawden Davis, Special to The Times
Drawing card Rather than tear down historic buildings in disuse, city planners chose to restore Fullerton's downtown, converting existing historic buildings into mixed-use space. The hard work and attention to detail has resulted in a self-contained community rich in history and full of modern conveniences. Hot spots Popular eateries such as Heroes, the Rockin' Taco Cantina and Steamer's Cafe, which has live jazz daily, give the area a vibrant, urban feel.
NEWS
October 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
Officials in earthquake-prone California have won their fight--at least for now--against federal legislation that would require hazard insurance for all public buildings. Despite Senate support for the requirement, the House removed it late Tuesday after vigorous opposition from the state's entire 52-member congressional delegation.
FOOD
June 23, 1994 | KITTY MORSE
There once was a time when abalone, this most succulent of shellfish, was plentiful along the Pacific Coast of North America. Within barely a generation, however, the delicate mollusk and its distinctive ear-shaped shell has become a rarity in the wild, a victim of gastronomic overkill. Experts have several explanations for this unfortunate depletion. The main reasons include overfishing and illegal gathering of undersized abalones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1990 | VINCENT SCHIRALDI, Vincent Schiraldi is director of the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives in San Francisco and a member of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Inmate Population Management.
Two big criminal-justice developments occurred during the last week of January. Charles Rothenberg, convicted of attempting to murder his son by setting him afire, was released from prison. California's Blue Ribbon Commission on Inmate Population Management, charged with devising ways to make the state's criminal-justice system saner, issued its report to the Legislature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1992 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
In a cultural marriage of convenience, representatives of the long-delayed, underfinanced Dance Gallery have agreed in principle with the R. D. Colburn School of the Performing Arts to share a proposed $25-million facility in the California Plaza redevelopment project downtown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1992 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
In a cultural marriage of convenience, representatives of the long-delayed, underfinanced Dance Gallery have agreed in principle with the R. D. Colburn School of the Performing Arts to share a proposed $25-million facility in the California Plaza redevelopment project downtown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1990 | VINCENT SCHIRALDI, Vincent Schiraldi is director of the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives in San Francisco and a member of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Inmate Population Management.
Two big criminal-justice developments occurred during the last week of January. Charles Rothenberg, convicted of attempting to murder his son by setting him afire, was released from prison. California's Blue Ribbon Commission on Inmate Population Management, charged with devising ways to make the state's criminal-justice system saner, issued its report to the Legislature.
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