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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
A couple of major ironies are folded into the title of the big new architecture exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA. " The first irony is that the title itself rings with echoes of architectural history. In 1980, when Paolo Portoghesi curated the first Venice Architecture Biennale, he called his show "The Presence of the Past," and he used it to explore the rising interest in history and ornament among the talented emerging architects of the day, including Frank Gehry and Arata Isozaki.
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WORLD
February 11, 2011 | By a Times Staff Writer
They stand like ghosts from a bygone era, struggling to maintain a shabby dignity in the face of creeping foliage and years of neglect, all the while fueling a debate: Should they be protected as rare treasures or leveled as worthless junk? Preservationists fear that Yangon's several hundred colonial-era buildings, a legacy of the British Empire at its height, will succumb to voracious Chinese property developers with a history of building tacky shopping malls for a quick buck. Several low- and mid-market malls have sprouted up in recent years, most a few miles from the run-down, old downtown area where the vintage buildings are concentrated, raising concern that Yangon will become just another noisy, ugly Asian city of mini-malls and sprawl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant and Rosanna Xia
Council members Tom LaBonge and Bernard Parks submitted separate motions Tuesday calling on the city to review and conduct reports on the earthquake safety of the city's older concrete buildings. The motions follow a Times report on concrete buildings that were built before 1976. By the most conservative estimate, as many as 50 of the more than 1,000 old concrete buildings in the city would collapse in a major earthquake, exposing thousands to injury or death. LaBonge's motion asks for the city's Department of Building and Safety to take the “first step” and report on possible ways to conduct “a comprehensive survey of non-ductile concrete buildings (built prior to 1976)
BUSINESS
April 16, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
With office rents and occupancy rates stuck in neutral, only nine new office buildings were completed in Los Angeles County in the first quarter. The nine buildings contain a total of 140,000 square feet, a pittance by local standards. The U.S. Bank Tower in downtown Los Angeles, for instance, holds more than 1.4 million square feet. More properties came on line in the fourth quarter of 2012, when 15 buildings with nearly 710,000 square feet were completed, real estate data provider CoStar Group said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014
Join Times staff writer Rosanna Xia for a discussion at 9 a.m. Monday about the University of California's release of data  on nearly 1,500 older concrete buildings across Los Angeles. The release of the data marks a key step in L.A.'s efforts to improve earthquake safety, but there's a tough road ahead. The list was compiled over several years, a first-of-its kind effort to identify a type of building that experts have long said pose the greatest risk of death.  Of all the older  concrete buildings  in Los Angeles, the researchers estimated about 75 would collapse during a huge quake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Jean Merl
More than 100 buildings are threatened and more than 1,200 acres have burned in a Santa Barbara County wildfire that could be pushed deeper into the brush Tuesday by dangerously strong winds. The so-called White fire appears to have started near a campsite in the Los Padres National Forest at about 2:30 p.m. Monday. The blaze was only 10% contained Tuesday morning and the U.S. Forest Service predicted firefighters wouldn't gain full control over it until next week. About 1,000 campers and 4,000 mountain residents were evacuated Monday.
TRAVEL
June 1, 2011 | By Gary Robertson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When you think of Las Vegas, you probably don't think of Las Vegas, N.M. It's the other Las Vegas, and perhaps the wildest Wild West town you've never heard of. I had never heard of Las Vegas, N.M., when I first encountered it in 1997 - a Western boomtown, frozen in time, with eye-popping architecture and more than 900 buildings on the state and National Register of Historic Places. I returned again in the fall of 2010 on my honeymoon, remarried after being single nearly 30 years.
WORLD
February 22, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
A devastating magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck the New Zealand city of Christchurch on Tuesday, killing at least 65 people and collapsing buildings onto victims, some of whom used their cellphones to frantically call for help, officials said. Photos: 6.3 earthquake hits New Zealand Rescuers dug through the rubble overnight amid reports that many people were still trapped and that the death toll could rise much higher. A statement posted on the website of the Christchurch Police Department said the fatalities included "two buses crushed by falling buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2011 | By Michael Miller, Los Angeles Times
The old church building looks forlorn at Warner Avenue and Nichols Street in Huntington Beach, its windows boarded up and the sign that juts over the sidewalk mostly smashed. From a distance, the structure doesn't give many indications of the role it once played in Orange County. Near the front door, though, a small cornerstone bears the words "Japanese Presbyterian Church A.D. 1934. " And that's the history that some in Orange County hope to save. The former Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Church — located on a 3.7-acre property along with a historic house, mission and minister's quarters — has belonged to Rainbow Disposal since 2004.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2010 | By Michelle Hofmann
Finding someone to replace windows just got a little more challenging because of tough new lead-safety requirements for contractors working on older homes. The Environmental Protection Agency's Renovation, Repair and Painting rule, which kicked in last month, requires additional safeguards by contractors working on homes, schools and childcare facilities built before U.S. regulators banned lead paint in 1978. The intention is to reduce the harm from lead for contractors and their workers as well as for the people who live, work or attend school in older structures.
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