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Bulimia

MAGAZINE
July 5, 1987
Nothing wastes women's time and health more than the idea present in Calistro's column. Women's time can be spent in ways more profitable to society than torturing their bodies into the proper physical shape to fit changing fashion dictates (three months is all it takes!). Also, articles of this kind contribute to the onset of anorexia, bulimia and other weight-related neuroses. Please don't have a hand in such nonsense. Vicky Mires Agoura Hills
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HEALTH
November 23, 2009 | By Melissa Healy
Binge eating was long seen by psychiatrists as an unusual symptom of major depression or an anxiety disorder. After all, it seemed sometimes to lessen or yield to antidepressants and psychotherapy -- both aimed primarily at treating depression or anxiety. But as anorexia and bulimia gained public recognition and as eating disorder clinics began to fill in the 1980s, the field began to see a growing group of patients who had clearly dysfunctional eating patterns yet fit the description of neither anorexia nor bulimia.
NEWS
January 3, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Eating disorders are increasing among children, particularly those younger than 12. And the answer isn’t to tell kids to start (or stop) eating. Disorders like anorexia and bulimia signal serious behavior problems. Here's an expert who can help explain why. Dr. David S. Rosen, professor of adolescent medicine at the University of Michigan Health System, will be the guest at a live Web chat Tuesday (1 p.m. Eastern, noon Central, 10 a.m. Pacific) to discuss eating disorders with Chicago Tribune health reporter Deborah Shelton.
NEWS
November 30, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Specialists who treat eating disorders have been noticing something different about their patients lately. More of them are men. "I have men coming into my office telling me they're convinced they were passed over for promotion because the other guy was slimmer and they look more like a beach ball. Or their wife is unhappy with them because of their appearance," says Dr. Randall Flanery, director of the eating disorders program in the behavioral medicine division of the St.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | LESLIE KNOWLTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most everyone has heard stories or seen made-for-TV movies about women and girls who starve themselves into barely walking skeletons or gorge on massive loads of food that are then vomited. Although about 7 million women across the United States suffer from eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa and bulimia--life-threatening and often chronic illnesses for which exact causes are not known--an estimated 1 million American men also struggle with the diseases.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many wrestling coaches, Terry Davis often placed tremendous emphasis on weight. How much does that boy weigh? Can he lose five pounds by Friday? Didn't I tell that kid not to go an ounce over 130? Davis, a longtime youth coach now in his first year at Whittier Christian High in La Habra, used to consider weight to be nearly as important as performance. But his outlook has changed.
SPORTS
August 7, 1994 | STEVE WILSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten years ago, a spunky sprite with a 1,000-watt smile and a girl-next-door name, Mary Lou Retton, vaulted from the Los Angeles Olympics across television screens into the homes of millions of Americans who fell in love with her. Sweet 16, 4-feet-9, a red-white-and-blue, stars-and-stripes ball spinning through the air, she made an entire country cheer on Aug. 3, 1984, when she landed firmly on her feet and flung up her arms, absolutely sure of a perfect 10 that gave her the first U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1988
Some binge eaters produce unusually small amounts of a hormone that ordinarily signals people that they are full, according to a study. The report suggests that a defect in production of this natural chemical may be an underlying cause of bulimia nervosa, an eating disorder in which people stuff themselves with food and then make themselves vomit. The study compared 14 women with bulimia to 10 healthy volunteers.
HEALTH
March 6, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A drug used to combat the nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy may provide the first effective treatment for bulimia nervosa, the eating disorder characterized by binge eating followed by vomiting. Dr. Patricia Faris and her colleagues at the University of Minnesota Medical School studied the drug odansetron in 26 women with severe, long-term bulimia. Fourteen received the drug, 12 a placebo.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | LESLIE KNOWLTON
While both anorexia nervosa and bulimia involve distorted obsessions with food, anorexics become emaciated and bulimics usually maintain a normal weight. * Both are considered serious psychiatric illnesses, with bulimia more common and anorexia more intractable. * People with eating disorders may also have other psychiatric problems, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder or mood disorders. * 86% of sufferers report onset of illness by age 20.
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