Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBullet Train
IN THE NEWS

Bullet Train

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
March 11, 2014
Re "Railing against a train," March 8 Passenger: "How come this bullet train went only 10 feet?" Conductor: "Misfired. " Carleton H. Ralston Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Rainbows in West Hollywood Letters: Rereading the 2nd Amendment Letters: Making pet adoption permanent
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Regularly scheduled service on California's bullet train system will not meet anticipated trip times of two hours and 40 minutes between Los Angeles and San Francisco, and are likely to take nearly a half-hour longer, a state Senate committee was told Thursday. The faster trips were held out to voters in 2008 when they approved $9 billion in borrowing to help pay for the project. Since then, a series of political compromises and planning changes designed to keep the $68-billion line moving ahead have created slower track zones in urban areas.
Advertisement
OPINION
February 13, 2014 | By Tom Zoellner
Who doesn't love a train? Who cannot fail to be seduced by the most appealing vehicle in human history - the rail-induced sensuality of "Brief Encounter," the desperate heroism of engineer Casey Jones, the creative muscle of the Big Four railroad barons, the plucky fortitude of Thomas the Tank Engine and the Little Engine That Could, all wrapped up in gleaming, rocking steel, punctuated by a high, lonesome whistle? And yet California voters have been expressing morning-after regrets since they voted for Proposition 1A, which promised them a bullet train from Los Angeles to San Francisco.
OPINION
March 11, 2014
Re "Railing against a train," March 8 Passenger: "How come this bullet train went only 10 feet?" Conductor: "Misfired. " Carleton H. Ralston Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Rainbows in West Hollywood Letters: Rereading the 2nd Amendment Letters: Making pet adoption permanent
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Ted Rall
Construction for high-speed rail through the Central Valley is supposed to start in July. But the state of California still hasn't purchased any of the land along the route. How will the train get from one city to the next? Magic.  ALSO: Photos: Unbuilt L.A. Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons The feline killer that stalks the streets Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall
OPINION
November 20, 2012
Re “ Bullet train leg to finish later ,” Nov. 16 It has been my experience that high-speed rail has brought untold benefits wherever it has been developed. The early decision to solve Japan's transportation needs with bullet trains had many side benefits, including the development of both industrial and commercial centers that were and are major supporting elements to the success of the system. The same can be said for the TGV in France. Jobs, growth and more freedom of movement are but a few of the positive elements from this long-overdue project.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Dan Turner
California's bullet train is appropriately named -- not because it will ever be as fast as a speeding bullet but because it has taken more potshots than a Montana stop sign . Critics deride the line as a train to nowhere that will never attract the funding needed to run all the way from Sacramento to San Diego (with a spur to San Francisco) as originally envisioned. What's more, they say, the train's planning has been so undermined by special interests that it has no chance of running fast enough to fulfill its promise to get from L.A. to San Francisco in 2 1/2 hours.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Ted Rall
Hop a ride to the future -- but hope that cattle migration doesn't interrupt your commute. California's high-speed rail project has been approved, though the initial phase would only link two cities in the Central Valley. These are not exactly major centers of business and culture. ALSO: Divvying up California's water Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons California, look to Wisconsin for budget lessons Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall . Follow Opinion L.A. on Twitter and Facebook .    
OPINION
March 30, 2013
Re "High-speed rail's strongest backers have concerns," March 27 It is time to put a bullet into California's bullet train. What is the justification, in the present difficult economy, to build a staggeringly expensive rail line that only a small percentage of the people will ever use and, according to this article, likely won't be a true high-speed system? The state should instead take a fraction of the $68 billion for this project and upgrade airports and highways. In the long term, California should invest in research to develop a cost-effective high-speed transportation system for the 21st century.
OPINION
June 14, 2012
Re "Would rail project foul the air?," June 11 Where did America go? Where is the drive to build much needed infrastructure that creates jobs? It worked after the Great Depression. Regarding California's bullet train, you can continue to look for reasons not to build it, but that's not what made this country great. Once upon a time, California would not have thought twice about moving this project forward. Now you can't swing a dead cat without hitting someone who is trying to stall it. Yes, the environment will be affected slightly while the system is built.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti opened the state's Democratic convention on Saturday with a tribute to the party's dominance in California, saying it has ensured progress on climate change, immigration, public transit and civil rights. Garcetti ran down a list of laws enacted on Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown's watch, including one that increases the minimum wage and another that grants driver's licenses to immigrants in the country without documentation. “While Washington dithers, here in California Democrats get things done,” Garcetti told Democrats gathered at the L.A. Convention Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- California's bullet train project would receive additional funding every year from the state greenhouse gas reduction program under proposed legislation from Gov. Jerry Brown. The measure would annually direct one-third of cap-and-trade revenue to the massive construction effort starting in 2015. The money is generated by polluters who pay for the right to release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The proposed legislation expands on Brown's previously announced one-year plan to use $250 million from the cap-and-trade program to support the bullet train in the upcoming fiscal year, which begins July 1. Other sources of funding, including voter-approved bonds, have been tied up by lawsuits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
California bullet train officials have been granted an extra three months to come up with funding to start meeting their obligations under a grant for the project, federal officials said Friday. The deal was struck under a new state funding contribution plan in which the state would begin spending its own money starting July 1 rather than April 1. The additional time would presumably allow the Legislature to act on Gov. Jerry Brown's request for $250 million for the project, allocated from the state's fees on greenhouse gas emissions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
A California appeals court on Friday put on hold a potentially crippling legal order by a Superior Court judge against the California high-speed rail project and said it would hold a review of the matter. The lower court's decision had essentially prevented rail officials from issuing any bonds to pay for the project, forcing them to rely on federal grants just as they are preparing to start construction of a line that would eventually run from Los Angeles to San Francisco. The action by the 3rd District Court of Appeal does not reverse the lower court decision, but it could give rail officials some hope that they can escape a legal situation that could jeopardize the project.
OPINION
February 13, 2014 | By Tom Zoellner
Who doesn't love a train? Who cannot fail to be seduced by the most appealing vehicle in human history - the rail-induced sensuality of "Brief Encounter," the desperate heroism of engineer Casey Jones, the creative muscle of the Big Four railroad barons, the plucky fortitude of Thomas the Tank Engine and the Little Engine That Could, all wrapped up in gleaming, rocking steel, punctuated by a high, lonesome whistle? And yet California voters have been expressing morning-after regrets since they voted for Proposition 1A, which promised them a bullet train from Los Angeles to San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Construction costs and revenue estimates for the California bullet train are headed downward while operating costs and ridership for the proposed statewide system are expected to increase above earlier forecasts, according to the project's latest business plan unveiled Friday. The draft plan summarizes the work of the California High-Speed Rail Authority during the past two years, contains revisions of ridership and cost estimates made in the 2012 business plan and describes the project's future goals, including the possibility of attracting private sector partners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | Ralph Vartabedian and Maura Dolan
With the state's bullet train project in a legal bind, the California Supreme Court on Wednesday ordered an appeals court to conduct a fast-track review of lower court rulings that have blocked the state's access to $9 billion in public funds needed for the Los Angeles-to-San Francisco line. The order granted Gov. Jerry Brown's administration the expedited legal review it sought. But the high court declined to take up the matter on its own, potentially slowing down the resolution of crucial legal and financial issues for the $68-billion construction project, according to attorneys involved in the case.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|