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Bullying

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October 19, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
An Illinois dad got the call on Thursday that no parent ever wants to receive. Brad Lewis' ex-wife was on the phone: Their 15-year-old son had shot himself in the chest. In the note Jordan Lewis left behind, he laid blame on bullying. Although stricken with grief, Lewis, 47, found resolve. He took to Facebook that night and posted a series of videos explaining his son's death and the events leading up to it: the alleged bullying, the concern of his son's best friend, the wellness visit by police the night before the suicide, and the 911 call his son made shortly before pulling the trigger.
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NATIONAL
March 13, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Two teenage girls in Maryland allegedly held a knife to the throat of an autistic 16-year-old boy and forced him to perform various sex acts as part of two months of bullying, authorities said. Lauren Ashley Bush, 17, has been charged as an adult in St. Mary's County in southern Maryland with two counts of first-degree assault, two counts of second-degree assault, false imprisonment and child pornography solicitation. A 15-year-old girl is facing the same allegations in juvenile court.
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SCIENCE
March 10, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Victims of bullying were more than twice as likely as other kids to contemplate suicide and about 2.5 times as likely to try to kill themselves, according to a new study that quantifies the emotional effects of being teased, harassed, beaten up or otherwise harmed by one's peers. Children and teens who were taunted by cyberbullies were especially vulnerable -- they were about three times as likely than other kids to have suicidal thoughts, the study found. The findings, published online Monday by the journal JAMA Pediatrics, puts the lie to the old adage about sticks and stones.
SCIENCE
March 10, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Victims of bullying were more than twice as likely as other kids to contemplate suicide and about 2.5 times as likely to try to kill themselves, according to a new study that quantifies the emotional effects of being teased, harassed, beaten up or otherwise harmed by one's peers. Children and teens who were taunted by cyberbullies were especially vulnerable -- they were about three times as likely than other kids to have suicidal thoughts, the study found. The findings, published online Monday by the journal JAMA Pediatrics, puts the lie to the old adage about sticks and stones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | Sandy Banks
It seems to happen often enough that we're no longer shocked to hear it: A teenager commits suicide after being bullied online by peers. But the recent death in Florida of 12-year-old Rebecca Ann Sedwick and arrest of two of her former middle school classmates makes it clear that victims are getting younger and bullies more brazen online. Two girls, 12 and 14, have been charged with felony aggravated stalking based on evidence of a year of online taunts and threats. Sheriff's deputies confiscated the cellphones and laptops of more than a dozen girls accused of bullying Rebecca and found messages such as "You should die. " This may be the first time children have been accused of a crime in connection with suicide.
SCIENCE
January 13, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
What do pediatricians call a coach who screams at his players, blames kids for prompting his outbursts and says his methods are justified because the team wins games? A bully. A more typical picture of a bully is a big kid intimidating a smaller one on a playground. But it's not age that defines a bully; it's power. “Nothing in the definition requires a peer-to-peer relationship, only one individual with perceived power over another,” experts write in an article published Monday in the journal Pediatrics . “The coach-athlete relationship involves an inherent imbalance of power.” Bullying is more than an annoyance.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Has anyone with a sibling not been in the back seat of a car, someone hitting someone and parents threatening to pull over “right this minute”? Just seems like part of growing up, right? Well some researchers say not necessarily. Parents, doctors and schools should not dismiss sibling bullying, they said. Sibling aggression can be as damaging as other sorts of bullying, and it can be linked to poorer mental health, according to a study published this week in the journal Pediatrics.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn and Janet Stobart
SAN FRANCISCO - On Ask.fm, millions of American teens talk about their hookups, struggles to get good grades and wild weekend parties with no parents or adults to peer over their shoulders. Some also use the social network to anonymously torment other teens. With its popularity soaring in middle schools and high schools across the U.S., Ask.fm is coming under attack from parents, politicians and privacy watchdog groups. It has been linked to the suicides of four teens in Britain and Ireland and one in the United States.
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Melissa Healy/The Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
There's a new pledge effort drive looking for recruits, and this one won't lower your taxes or require you to remain a virgin until marriage. This pledge is aimed at getting the many who witness bullying behavior against the few to stop it by speaking up. The "Stop Bullying: Speak Up" campaign was launched this week by Facebook and Time Warner, whose subsidiary Cartoon Network is pushing it hard with one of its prime target audiences, schoolkids.The...
NATIONAL
August 19, 2009 | Associated Press
A Missouri woman is accused of cyber-bullying for allegedly posting photos and personal information of a teenage girl on the "casual encounters" section of Craigslist after an Internet argument. Prosecutors said Elizabeth A. Thrasher put the 17-year-old's picture, e-mail address and cellphone number on the website in a posting that suggested the girl was seeking a sexual encounter. St. Charles County police said the victim was the daughter of Thrasher's ex-husband's girlfriend.
SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | By Sam Farmer
Kevin O'Neill, the longtime Miami Dolphins trainer fired in the wake of the team's bullying scandal, is firing back at the franchise through his lawyer. Attorney Jack Scarola issued a statement Thursday on behalf of O'Neill, who in the recently released report of investigator Ted Wells is accused of laughing at inappropriate jokes aimed at offensive tackle Jonathan Martin and an unnamed assistant trainer. O'Neill accompanied Dolphins executives, coaches and scouts to last month's scouting combine in Indianapolis, but was fired on the eve of the annual event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | By Phil Willon
Cedarville, Calif. - Cherie Lash Rhoades' temper was well known among the many small Indian tribes settled in Modoc County, tribal members say. One man said he started avoiding Rhoades after witnessing an outburst years ago when the two served on a committee for a Native American healthcare clinic. "Something didn't go her way, so she picked up the corner of the table and threw it," said Sonny Craig, a member of the Pit River tribe just outside Alturas. Even within her tiny Cedarville Rancheria tribe, Rhoades could be confrontational, a member of the tribe said.
SPORTS
February 20, 2014 | Sam Farmer
INDIANAPOLIS - A scant three weeks into the off-season, the NFL is dealing with three public relations infernos, two involving current players. There's the Miami Dolphins bullying saga, chronicled in a just-released investigation that pulled back the curtain on the team's toxic locker room culture. The Dolphins have fired their offensive line coach and longtime trainer, and player suspensions could be in the works. There's the arrest of retired Pro Bowl safety Darren Sharper, most recently an NFL Network analyst, on charges that he drugged and raped two women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
If you have any interest in the complex and nuanced dynamics of workplace bullying and harassment, you must sit down with the newly released report about what, exactly, happened in and out of the Miami Dolphins locker room that led Jonathan Martin to walk away from the team halfway through the season last year. The 144-page report is a masterpiece of evenhandedness, produced by a team of attorneys led by Ted Wells, whose New York litigation firm was retained by the NFL to investigate the circumstances around Martin's departure and his subsequent accusations against his teammates.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
A lot of TV talk this weekend will be devoted to the Seattle Seahawks and Denver Broncos, but that doesn't mean the rest of the NFL has been packed up and put into deep freeze until next fall. And nowhere is that more obvious than NBC, which aired the first interview with former Miami Dolphins offensive lineman Jonathan Martin since he left the team last October. Martin created headlines last fall when he abruptly left the Dolphins and reportedly checked himself into a Florida hospital to be treated for emotional distress.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker
The reason New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has begun to punch back more forcefully against accusations of bullying and cronyism is suggested in a new poll showing the road-closure scandal surrounding the governor has cut into what once was his chief asset: a perception of blunt honesty. A national survey by the Pew Research Center and USA Today showed that almost 6 in 10 Americans who had heard of the controversy do not believe his assertions that he did not know that his aides were involved in closing lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge last September - causing a massive four-day traffic jam - until evidence of it became public recently.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/for the Booster Shots blog
We all know that many bullies get their start in the sandbox, not the boardroom, and that their youngest victims can nurture the resulting hurt for a lifetime. No surprise, then, that next week, "Sesame Street's" Big Bird and Elmo--who despite their agelessness have been around a long time--will tackle the subject of bullying in its earliest phases. Three new episodes devoted to bullying air Monday, Tuesday and Friday (Oct. 17, 18 and 21), kicking off a broad initiative that includes a Web page with advice and discussion for parents and activities for kids and a five-part video series that features psychologists, advocates and educators talking about bullying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2001
Re "District Adopts Anti-Bullying Policy," March 15: If this is to succeed, the faculty will have to give up their godlike aloofness, get down in the trenches with the kids and see for themselves what is going on. The kids will resent this, but so what? If a victim reports a bully, the only way to protect him from retaliation is to provide an around-the-clock bodyguard or send him out of town; otherwise, his tormentor will get to him sooner or later. The adults should get involved in everything the students do, not just in the classroom.
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