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Bullying

ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
History, as we all know, is framed by events. But it also grows from relationships, both personal and political, and is framed by how the actions of particular players in specific circumstances set the course for the future. In her sweeping new history, "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism," Doris Kearns Goodwin focuses on the relationships among Roosevelt, Taft and those pesky muckraking journalists and how their individual behaviors influenced not only one another but also the nation.
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SPORTS
November 6, 2013 | Sam Farmer
While people around the sports world see the suspended Richie Incognito as a bigoted bully, retired NFL offensive lineman Kyle Turley thinks it's perfectly plausible that the Miami Dolphins guard was carrying out orders from his coaches to toughen up teammate Jonathan Martin. Turley said he was given those enforcer responsibilities in college and the pros. "I took on that leadership role," Turley said. "The coaches gave me those reins. "I'm sure in this situation - not to justify the rhetoric or terminology that Incognito used - but I understand if this was the role that was given to him. ... It's absurd for the real world to accept this, and nobody should, but this is not the real world.
SPORTS
November 5, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
The NFL Players Assn. weighed in Tuesday on the alleged bullying case involving Miami Dolphins offensive linemen Jonathan Martin and Richie Incognito, saying it will "insist on a fair investigation" by the NFL. Incognito is accused of harassing Martin, including a threatening chain of racially charged voice-mails and text messages. "We expect that the NFL and its clubs create a safe and professional workplace for all players, and that owners, executives, coaches and players should set the best standards and examples," the players union said in a written statement.
SPORTS
November 5, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
The bullying allegations against Miami Dolphins guard Richie Incognito potentially raise a troubling inconsistency for the franchise. Incognito came to the team with a checkered past -- including getting kicked off the Nebraska and Oregon football teams -- so did the Dolphins devote sufficient resources to watching him? That he was a member of the team's leadership council, and last season was given the Good Guy award by the beat writers who cover the team, underscore the conflicting feelings within the building about Incognito, who is accused of threatening and harassing fellow offensive lineman Jonathan Martin.
SPORTS
November 4, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
A week after Miami Dolphins tackle Jonathan Martin walked away from the team amid alleged threats and racially charged harassment from a fellow offensive lineman, the NFL is looking into whether the team played a role in allowing the bullying culture to flourish. At the center of the controversy is guard Richie Incognito, who late Sunday was suspended indefinitely by the Dolphins for conduct detrimental to the team. Earlier Sunday, the Dolphins issued a statement that dismissed reports of bullying by Incognito as "speculation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
DreamWorks is heading back to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. A year after Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" became a box office hit and award-season favorite, the filmmaker's DreamWorks Studios has announced plans to make another presidential drama -- and based on the work of the same author who helped make "Lincoln" possible. The studio has acquired the rights to historian Doris Kearns Goodwin's upcoming book "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism," which is set for publication Nov. 5. Kearns also wrote 2005's "Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln," which became the basis for Tony Kushner's "Lincoln" script.
NEWS
October 29, 2013 | By Nico Lang, guest blogger
I know what it's like to be Carrie White, the titular pariah in the classic horror film "Carrie. " I used to be her. In middle school, I was the kid who sat by himself at lunch, listening to my CD player or reading a book, hoping not to be noticed. I thought if I stared hard enough at the pages, I might disappear. Invisibility had its advantages. If the other students couldn't see me, they couldn't laugh when I walked past or whisper the nickname they had made up for me. Some time around the sixth grade, my classmates figured out that my name sounds a lot like “Dick Wang,” and every time someone pushed me into a locker or threw my backpack in the garbage, it wasn't me they were doing it to. It was him. For current and former teenage losers, Carrie White has become an icon, which explains her continual rebirth in pop culture.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2013 | By Matt Pearce and Melanie Mason, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
SPARKS, Nev. -- Two students from separate schools committed suicide within days of each other this month -- which is National Bullying Prevention Month -- and both boys apparently had been bullied. Now, parents are asking questions not just about bullying but also about anti-bullying videos, which both schools aired shortly before the incidents.  Brad Lewis' son Jordan, 15, a sophomore at Carterville High School in Illinois, killed himself Oct. 17 by shooting himself in the chest.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2013 | By Melanie Mason
SPARKS, Nev. - He loved to tell jokes but couldn't stop himself from laughing before the punch line. He worked in his family's restaurant and used his earnings to buy ice cream and candy. He played the trumpet and rooted for the San Francisco 49ers. And on Monday, within three ghastly minutes, he killed a popular teacher and shot two of his peers on the grounds of Sparks Middle School. Then he killed himself. Now, in a process all too familiar in Aurora, Colo., Newtown, Conn., and other American cities, people in Sparks are looking for clues, reviewing events, searching for an explanation.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2013 | By Melanie Mason and David Zucchino
SPARKS, Nev. - He was dressed like any other student at Sparks Middle School: standard khaki pants and a Sparks sweatshirt. He was tall for a middle schooler, with dark, spiked hair, and in his hand early Monday was a Ruger 9-millimeter semiautomatic handgun. The boy pointed the gun at about 30 terrified students huddled in a corner near an outdoor school basketball court. He locked eyes with eighth-grader Omar Lopez, who was nearby. "You guys ruined my life, so I'm going to ruin yours," the boy told the group, according to Omar.
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