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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1995 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was the light fixtures that turned off the Castaic school district trustees. Since September 1994, they have been trying to secure millions of dollars in federal earthquake-mitigation funds to move the 638-student Castaic Elementary School, which sits in the shadow of the dam that holds back half-mile-long Castaic Lake and is bordered by high-voltage power lines and oil pipelines to boot. The paperwork pace has been maddeningly slow, board members say.
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OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The key lines in the final report of the Los Angeles County Blue Ribbon Commission on Child Protection, which was released late Friday and comes before the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, may be two sentences that don't use the words "foster care," "child death," "Dependency Court" or "early intervention. " They deal instead with the question of just why a government with vast resources at its disposal can't seem to put them together to protect children from abuse and neglect. "The problem is not that county leaders and workers do not care," the report says.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's conditional use permit system--damned last week by Mayor Richard Riordan as worthy of a Communist country--is to be overhauled to make it easier for non-controversial projects to win City Hall approval, a top Los Angeles city planner promised Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | Sandy Banks
At this point, it may not matter much to the public what actually went on in that Santa Monica High classroom where a teacher was recorded wrestling a student to the floor. The 58-second cellphone clip recorded by a student went viral this week, turning the teacher and the student into symbols of what's wrong with public schools: Defiant students. Overwhelmed teachers. Feckless administrators. Knee-jerk policies with no room for common sense. "We're in the middle of a cultural change, and this case reflects that shift," said Shawn McMullen Chen, a high school teacher for 25 years.
OPINION
January 23, 2013 | By Sarah Chayes
In testimony before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Wednesday, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton will resume the fraught conversation about what exactly took place at the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya, last year on Sept. 11. Members of Congress have made it clear they will focus on how the events, which led to the deaths of the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans, were characterized in the hours and days that followed. That issue flamed into white-hot partisanship ahead of the U.S. presidential election, with some accusing Obama appointees of deliberately downplaying Al Qaeda involvement for political reasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1989
The column is aptly titled. At one time the superior principle in public school was education. Gradillas is a hero. He provided an environment that nurtured the minds of the students. He, along with Jaime Escalante, taught the students to suspend their disbelief in themselves to learn. None of us know what we can become without unshackling our minds of limitations. The students lose once more. Mediocrity is reinstated, cemented in place with fear and ignorance. Inertia continues to reign.
OPINION
February 26, 2007
Re "City Hall, L.A. Unified clash again," Feb. 22 I just read a quote by L.A. Deputy Mayor Ramon Cortines, in which he claimed that a Los Angeles Unified School District report tabulating dropouts was ready but had been withheld "because of the damn bureaucracy." There are "four layers of bureaucracy so you still don't have it." I still remember how Cortines, who was L.A. Unified's interim superintendent, added one of those layers of bureaucracy by constructing 11 mini-districts that added more offices and officials and contributed nothing to the students' success.
OPINION
March 21, 2007
Re "From CAO to CEO," editorial, March 18 Amending the Los Angeles County code and charter to shift accountability from the Board of Supervisors to the appointed chief administrative officer removes the people from the process of governance and muzzles their elected officials. This reckless proposal is disruptive to the democratic process. The county's current structure already provides the officer with authority and oversight of the department heads and supports open government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1998
Pete Wilson's Proposition 8, touted by Kenneth L. Khachigian ("Prop. 8 Will Hold Schools Accountable," Sept. 13) is bad legislation. True, Proposition 8 has provisions for permanent class-size reduction and zero tolerance for drugs, but these programs already exist and are really window dressing. The worst section of Proposition 8 is the establishment of an education czar. Appointed by the governor for a 10-year term without confirmation by the Legislature, the chief inspector can create his/her own bureaucracy with funding that must come from the Department of Education's budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Los Angeles schools chief Roy Romer on Thursday said his top priorities will include shrinking the district bureaucracy, relieving overcrowding and calming the clamor for breaking up the district. "There's no issue that has caused me more concern than building more schools," Romer said at a Town Hall Los Angeles luncheon. "I don't yet see a path to get us out of that thicket." "I just want to say to you that I'm very excited to take this on," the former Colorado governor said.
OPINION
March 19, 2014
Re "Let 100 parklets bloom," Editorial, March 16 I laud The Times for its support of the city's new "People St" project. Streamlining community initiatives to transform available common property into sidewalk plazas and other desirable spaces is a welcomed development. More urgently, I wish such streamlining were applied to turf replacement on parkways to save our precious water and reduce noise and exhaust pollution from lawn maintenance. Unfortunately, as my condominium association in North Hollywood has learned, we have to apply to one agency for acceptable trees, another for surfaces, plants and design, and yet another for consideration of a rebate.
OPINION
November 10, 2013 | Doyle McManus
Just in time for Veterans Day, the embattled secretary of Veterans Affairs, Eric K. Shinseki, announced last week that his department had reduced its backlog of overdue disability claims from more than 600,000 in March to about 400,000. "The trend line is in the right direction," Shinseki told reporters, noting that the VA had cut the number of claims older than a year by 93%. With hundreds of thousands of cases still unresolved, Shinseki hasn't gotten much credit so far - but to the surprise of his critics, he's on track to achieve his goal of eliminating the backlog by 2015.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
When the bike patrols suddenly ended in downtown Los Angeles' arts district last month, junk began to pile up against the curb on Seaton Street. Over on Mateo Street, a trail of aqua-blue chips from shattered car windows glittered along the gutter. "It's like they got the memo the guys were gone," said actress Dawn Cody, who lives in the arts district. The private patrols were run by the neighborhood's business improvement district - one of 10 downtown and 39 throughout Los Angeles.
WORLD
March 28, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
BRASILIA, Brazil - Francisco Everardo Oliveira Silva never expected to actually be elected to Brazil's Congress. When he ran for a seat in 2010, he used his clown name, Tiririca, and wore a tiny orange hat and a blond wig in his campaign TV spots. Between singing and dancing, he made some very odd campaign promises. "What does a federal deputy do? I don't really know. But vote for me, and I'll tell you!" "I promise to help those in need," he said, in a nod to political corruption.
WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
VATICAN CITY - In private meetings before their conclave to elect a new pope, Roman Catholic cardinals took note when one of their number rose to speak - clearly, quietly and persuasively - about the need to purify the church and streamline its unwieldy bureaucracy. Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio seemed to sum up the very themes and challenges the leaders were debating. He was forceful without being abrasive, one cardinal recalled Thursday. By the time they strode solemnly into the magnificent Sistine Chapel and closed away the outside world Tuesday, many of the cardinals had significantly refined their lists of candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum and Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
A nonprofit group that delivers services to people with HIV and AIDS wants voters to force the city of Los Angeles to create its own health department, separate from the county. The AIDS Healthcare Foundation, a longtime critic of the county's health bureaucracy, wants the city to operate its own health agency rather than rely on the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. The foundation has begun gathering signatures for a 2014 city ballot measure to do just that. The county department is too big and does an abysmal job of disease control, foundation President Michael Weinstein said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
You have to understand the bureaucratic mind, and its paranoid fear of the media, to comprehend why Randy Mehringer was denied a job as a police officer because he told a racial joke. Unless there is more to the story than we've been told, a Los Angeles Police Department job interviewer asked Mehringer if he had ever told a racial joke. It so happens that Mehringer, while working out at the gym, had offered up to a couple of friends a bum joke about the Million Man March.
OPINION
January 23, 2013 | By Sarah Chayes
In testimony before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Wednesday, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton will resume the fraught conversation about what exactly took place at the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya, last year on Sept. 11. Members of Congress have made it clear they will focus on how the events, which led to the deaths of the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans, were characterized in the hours and days that followed. That issue flamed into white-hot partisanship ahead of the U.S. presidential election, with some accusing Obama appointees of deliberately downplaying Al Qaeda involvement for political reasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2012 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Voters told public health officials to begin monitoring the filming of sex scenes in pornographic movies. On Wednesday, the county was trying to figure out how. The new law requires porn actors to wear condoms and establishes a permitting system similar in some ways to how Los Angeles County inspects restaurants. Porn producers are required to purchase health permits from the county, which will do spot inspections on porn sets to make sure condoms are being used. The inspectors can close production if the filmmakers don't comply with the rules.
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