Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBureaucracy
IN THE NEWS

Bureaucracy

NEWS
July 1, 1989 | From the Washington Post
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, responding to pressures for better Pentagon management in the face of weapons procurement scandals, has proposed restructuring the U.S. military's top management to eliminate layers of bureaucracy and tighten control over weapons buying, according to documents obtained by the Washington Post.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1993
After reading about the generous gift of $500 million by Walter Annenberg to public education to foster a "standard of excellence," I then read about the Los Angeles Unified School District's Millikan Middle School's attempt to get a new principal, one of their own assistant principals who is seemingly the choice of faculty, students and parents and has been at the school 10 years. The superintendent and director of middle schools for the LAUSD, however, declared that "it's not the norm" and went on to pontificate that principals are chosen with "diversity of experience and "familiarity with a school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
A couple of Los Angeles County supervisors dropped by The Times last week to discuss our treatment of the county's fiscal crisis. Board Chairman Ed Edelman and Supervisor Yvonne Brathwaite Burke felt we were giving the wrong message. It was true, they said, that the county ended the year with many millions of dollars more than expected after crying poverty during budget hearings.
NEWS
October 7, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more centuries than she can count, 81-year-old Saku Ishikawa's family has tilled its 25-acre farm in the gold and green valley of Ibaraki. Every spring, rice planting. Every fall, harvesting. Before the full moon, offerings of thanksgiving for an abundant crop. Except for the occasional typhoon or earthquake, the rhythm of life varied little. Until one day this year, when Ishikawa looked out the window of her wooden farmhouse and saw a foreigner standing in the middle of her land.
NEWS
May 1, 1999 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mentor Hoti, a teenager from Kosovo living on his own in a refugee camp, thought he'd be in Germany with his parents by now. Instead, almost everything that could go wrong did go wrong. The international organization that was supposed to be advocating for him lost his file. The German Embassy here refused to give him any special treatment, blaming his unfortunate circumstances on his parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
With its daily assault on health and senses, "The Third World," a stretch of junkyards and dumps near the harbor, is a reminder of just how ineffective Los Angeles government can be. The main drag of this section of East Wilmington is an unpaved city street, blocked by huge piles of used tires, auto parts, pieces of concrete and the other refuse of industrial L.A. Dull-eyed prostitutes entertain customers in camper trucks parked on the fringes of scrap yards and on other littered streets.
NEWS
June 21, 1988 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Bunny Allen raised his tanned forearm in front of him, level with his eyes and parallel to the ground. "He sank his teeth in right along there," he said, tracing a hairline scar along his arm. "That leopard's face was as close to mine as mine is to yours. And all I could think of at that very moment was what beautiful eyes he had--beautiful amber eyes."
NEWS
December 15, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine months after top federal officials promised a sweeping and unprecedented nationwide review of police brutality in the wake of the Rodney G. King beating, examinations by Congress and the Justice Department appear to have vanished within the bureaucracy. The congressional probe, announced with much fanfare by Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.), chairman of the House Government Operations Committee, has not even started, and officials acknowledge that they are not certain when, if ever, it will.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
The family of a Mexican-born man who was shot and killed on the Santa Ana Freeway in August now faces the loss of the pickup truck that police impounded for evidence in the case. After Juan Pedro Trujillo was shot dead Aug. 6, his pickup truck was impounded as evidence. Almost two months after the Anaheim tire store employee's death, family members are being told they can't have the truck back until they pay $300 in storage fees. They say they don't have the money.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Just before dawn on Dec. 5, a fellow worker found Dennis Claypool and Mark DeMoss lying dead on their backs in a large tanker-trailer they had been directed to clean at a trucking company 60 miles south of Chicago. The two young men had died in the same way as about 3,000 other workers in the last decade: by breathing unsafe air in enclosed work spaces.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|