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Bureaucrats

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OPINION
June 5, 2006
Re "Court Curbs the Speech of Public Employees," May 31 The U.S. Supreme Court decision to deny whistle-blower protection to public employees confirms what many of us already know. As the salaries of top government bureaucrats rise faster than the price of gasoline, job protection and career advancement become everyone's top priority. Nonelected bureaucrats surround themselves with "yes men" loyal only to the boss, often at the expense of the very people their office was created to serve.
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NATIONAL
January 27, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - The bus was standing room only as travelers hauling luggage jostled for space amid the commuters and other local riders. Two men with skis, ski boots and backpacks squeezed into the nook beside the rear exit, blocking the door. A woman with two children and three suitcases struggled to drag the bags up the narrow aisle as the bus bounced through Manhattan and Queens to its destination: LaGuardia Airport, otherwise known as "America's worst airport. " How bad is LaGuardia?
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WORLD
September 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Elba Esther Gordillo resigned as secretary-general of the formerly ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, slamming the party's leadership as undemocratic and bureaucratic. Gordillo was supposed to assume party leadership automatically when Roberto Madrazo stepped down to run for the party's presidential nomination. Instead, a party assembly elected Mariano Palacios Alcocer as Madrazo's replacement.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Samantha Power came back from the war in Bosnia revolted by the atrocities she witnessed and convinced that world powers must intervene to stop them. Nearly two decades later, Power will shoulder that responsibility herself as President Obama's ambassador to the United Nations. Power, 42, a journalist and activist before Obama drew her into government eight years ago, said she would try to "do what America does best: stand up against repressive regimes and promote human rights.
OPINION
March 9, 2003
Re "Officials Seek Scrutiny of O.C. Personnel Office" (Feb. 7): Once the smoke clears, the record will show that the allegations have been raised by a small group of primarily male bureaucrats who have waged a campaign of verbal terrorism against the female leadership of the Office of Human Resources. From conversations on golf courses to the hallways of county buildings, salacious comments made about the leadership have included discriminatory remarks and gender-bashing. The damaging gossip and verbal bullying have been persistent and pervasive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles bureaucrats are once again fighting a war of words that they just cannot seem to win: They are being challenged to write in plain English. The latest battlefield in this fight for understanding is the City Council agenda, which is about to get a complete remodeling of format and content. Some council members say they just cannot comprehend many of the convoluted and jargon-ridden passages, while others see the flagrant use of government-issued vocabulary as an attempt by the bureaucracy to slip measures by an unquestioning council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2000
Re "$35-Million Neighborhood Renewal Is Behind Schedule," Feb. 4: Are any of the bureaucrats in charge behind in their salaries? LOUIS D. MANN Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1986
This letter is directed at those people who think all government employees are bureaucrats (Letters, Oct. 15). In Los Angeles if you need a bone marrow transplant or other state-of-the-art treatment, you go to UCLA. (To be treated by a bureaucrat?) If someone you love is in a serious accident they are taken to a regional trauma center, many of which are state hospitals. (Run by bureaucrats?) First-line research is done in most state universities (Conducted by bureaucrats?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2000
Re the Bush ad: Well, it just goes to show you that you can't spell bureaucrats without the word "rats" in it. MIKE ARVIZU La Crescenta
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1988
Apparently, the court and judges responsible for the irrational ruling that voter approval for tax proposals represents a "gross interference with the fiscal responsibility of local governments" (Times, Sept. 18) never heard of a war that our ancestors fought and won a few years ago over an almost identical issue, namely the issue of "taxation without representation." Do we now need to stage another "Boston Tea Party" to alert the lawyers and bureaucrats to the legal reality that we have had a democratic form of government in this country for over 200 years, which, in theory, requires that government and its officials govern only with the consent of the governed, of which the lawyers and bureaucrats presently comprise only a small, but swiftly multiplying, minority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2013 | Steve Lopez
In a rare but perhaps fleeting triumph of clear-headed thinking at Los Angeles City Hall, high-level officials have rescinded a citation issued to a South L.A. family for the crime of planting squash in their frontyard. On the evening of my Wednesday column about Angel and Carl Teger's vegetable garden, two members of City Councilman Bernard Parks' staff visited the scene of the crime and reported back to their boss. Parks then fired off a letter to Ron Lorenzen, assistant chief of the city's Bureau of Urban Forestry.
WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW - Russian authorities offered a teasing glimpse of liberation for U.S. fugitive Edward Snowden on Wednesday when they said he could leave the diplomatic no man's land of Moscow's main international airport and live in Russia while he waits to hear about his request for temporary asylum. No sooner had Russian news media reported that the undocumented American would be given papers to cross into Russia than his lawyer said Snowden's attempt to clear passport control had been thwarted by "bureaucratic difficulties.
OPINION
July 9, 2013 | By Ajit Pai
It's a common experience in cities like Los Angeles. You raise your hand to hail a cab. One goes by. Then another. You contemplate giving up and heading to the closest bus stop or Metro subway station. And you're left frustrated, thinking that there's got to be a better way. Enter Uber. Uber's mobile app lets consumers arrange for a ride in a Town Car-like vehicle from their phone. Ride-sharing services Lyft and Sidecar operate in similar fashion but use privately owned cars. One plus is that the app allows you to see whether any available cars are nearby and how long it'll take before one can pick you up. Another is the payment system: Funds are deducted automatically from your pre-linked credit card, so there's no need to carry a wallet (a receipt is emailed to the customer)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2013 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
School district officials have reversed a decision that cost a top-performing Los Angeles campus about $300,000 in funding after parents uncovered evidence that a bureaucratic error led to the loss of funds. Five other schools also are likely to get more dollars as well. L.A. Unified Supt. John Deasy acknowledged Friday that internal confusion resulted in several schools failing to qualify for federal Title 1 money. "Services that they had counted on will not be lost," Deasy told The Times.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2013 | By Matea Gold and Jim Puzzanghera, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The ousted head of the Internal Revenue Service apologized Friday for the agency's "foolish mistakes" in singling out conservative groups for intrusive and time-consuming scrutiny, but said that the effort was not driven by partisan motives. Acting IRS Commissioner Steven Miller, whose tenure will end Wednesday after he resigned under pressure this week, said the agency staff's attempts to identify groups with political aims was not "targeting," as it was termed in an inspector general's audit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2013 | Bloomberg News
James M. Buchanan, the U.S. economist who won the 1986 Nobel Prize for applying the principles of economic self-interest to understand why politicians do what they do, has died. He was 93. He died Wednesday at a hospital in Blacksburg, Va., according to the Center for Study of Public Choice at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., where Buchanan was a distinguished professor emeritus of economics. No cause was given. Buchanan was a pioneer in the field known as public-choice theory, which views government decisions through the personal interests of the bureaucrats and elected leaders who want to advance in their careers and win campaigns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1994
Private persons engaged in the lawful business of providing medical care for the poor have made serious charges against the bureaucrats at county general hospital. It has been the position of the Alliance of Taxpayers that the methods used by these same bureaucrats to finance hospital expansion is very unethical, untimely and deprives the taxpayers of the right to vote. Allowing bureaucrats to spend taxpayer money without public scrutiny and voter approval can easily result in inappropriate and perhaps criminal behavior.
WORLD
January 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Australia has banned taxpayer-funded massages for some pampered bureaucrats as part of an austerity drive, Assistant Treasurer Chris Bowen said. Bowen's Labor Party, which was elected to government Nov. 24, has long railed against the free massages. The most recent figures produced in Parliament showed that bureaucrats spent $95,451 in public money on rubdowns in 2004. "There are lots of very hard working people . . . working 12-hour shifts in factories as well who would love a back rub at the end of the day, I am sure.
NATIONAL
December 12, 2012 | David Zucchino
When Amber Oberg left the U.S. Army after eight years of active duty, her timing seemed perfect. Congress was creating a Post-9/11 GI Bill, with generous payments for veterans seeking higher education. But a month into her first semester at UC Davis, Oberg has yet to receive her tuition, housing and book money from the Department of Veterans Affairs. "I didn't expect to get out of the military and then have to wait and wait for the education money that was promised me," said Oberg, a single mother of two. She said she went back to school after a personal bankruptcy and the loss of her home to foreclosure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Before the first star appears, dozens of fires lick the sand at Dockweiler State Beach, mirroring the copper-colored sunset. This coastal strip in Playa del Rey is the last major L.A. outpost of a California rite of summer since Annette Funicello and Frankie Avalon Watusied through the "Beach Blanket Bingo" era: the beach bonfire. Every weekend, hundreds of people stream down Imperial Highway as early as 6 a.m. to grab one of Dockweiler's 60 fire rings, roast marshmallows and listen to the surf as the light fades away.
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