Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBuried
IN THE NEWS

Buried

NEWS
May 13, 1989 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
Graveyards have long figured prominently in Chicago lore, so many of their occupants having managed to make it to the polls come election time. But the latest graveyard story to be unearthed here may be hard to top. A few months ago, workers on the northwest side were excavating land for a new private housing development when they uncovered some bones--old human bones. That, in itself, is not so unusual. Contractors in these parts occasionally stumble over Indian graves or unmarked family plots from the 19th Century.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2008 | Richard Winton and Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writers
"CSI" came to San Marino on Friday. Dozens of investigators armed with shovels, cadaver-sniffing dogs, ground-penetrating radar and other high-tech tools descended on a corner of the mansion-studded community not used to such intense police activity. San Marino has been thrust into a starring role in a bizarre case involving a Boston man with numerous aliases, a body found in the backyard of a house and a long-forgotten missing persons case. Authorities on Friday went to a Lorain Road house looking for buried bodies and other evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1995 | MICHELLE LOCKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Resting in a eucalyptus grove overlooking the chilly splendor of San Francisco Bay, the prison cemetery slumbers, undisturbed save for brisk sea breezes ruffling the long grasses. Beneath the carpet of green turf lie some once-infamous convicts. There's Bluebeard Watson, who hustled at least seven of his 20-plus wives off to unscheduled meetings with their maker. Or William Kogut, a gambler who wound up on a mortuary slab with the ace of diamonds embedded in his brain. But despite their notorious lives, Watson, Kogut and the other 698 inmates buried in San Quentin's Boot Hill Cemetery are virtually forgotten in death, their graves marked only by small wooden stakes.
HOME & GARDEN
January 23, 2010 | By Jeff Spurrier
They may be cast in steel, assembled out of driftwood, machined on industrial lathes or hand-carved out of salt, but ultimately all of these urns have two common purposes: to contain and to heal. Rather than be burned, buried or sequestered in a columbarium, the vessels are destined for a more visible final resting place -- a mantel, perhaps, or a family room bookshelf, maybe even a spot in the garden. The dead, you see, are coming home. Though the majority of Americans are still buried in a casket, more are choosing cremation.
WORLD
June 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Rescue teams digging through a ravine buried in mud pulled three bodies from a hot springs inn on the outskirts of Kurihara, Japan, bringing the death toll to at least nine after a powerful earthquake. Soldiers caked in mud recovered the bodies of the inn's 80-year-old owner and two others buried when the magnitude 7.2 quake struck early Saturday, triggering several major landslides. Four more people were believed to still be buried. An additional 100 living in a hamlet nearby remained stranded and had to be slowly airlifted out by police and military helicopters.
REAL ESTATE
January 12, 1986
Pope's criticism of Proposition 13 received front page publicity in the Real Estate section. The replies were buried in back pages, and yesterday the Real Estate section was buried in the Metro section. This is not equal representation. The replies should be republished on the front page of the usual Real Estate section. JOHN McGLYNN Los Angeles
SPORTS
February 17, 1996
I enjoyed Bill Christine's Feb. 10 column on jockey Russell Baze, the first recipient of the Isaac Murphy Award, and his brief history of Murphy's accomplishments. Though it's true that Isaac Murphy was originally buried in a place known only as "Old No. 2 Cemetery," his remains were removed in 1967 and buried at the beautiful Kentucky Horse Park, where visitors are reminded of the great jockey every day. PATRICIA CORRIGAN Covina
WORLD
October 5, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Typhoon Parma caused widespread flooding and landslides that buried at least two families in the Philippines, then hung threateningly off the coast, drenching the country's north as well as Taiwan. At least 16 people died when Parma hit the main island of Luzon on Saturday, though the capital, Manila -- still awash in floodwaters from a storm barely a week earlier -- was spared a new disaster. In Benguet province, a family of five, including a 1-year-old boy, died when their home was buried in a landslide, said police Senior Supt.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|