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Buried

SPORTS
May 27, 1995
Strong, ugly and mean, Dennis Rodman reminds me of my pit bull. No wonder my neighbor doesn't like that dog. JIM JOHNSON Alhambra Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't Dennis Rodman a little less of a prima donna, pre-Madonna? DAVID PECCHIA West Los Angeles What a coincidence! Last week they found a Pharaoh's 50 buried sons and then on Saturday, Hakeem Olajuwon buried 12 more. PAUL ECKER Diamond Bar My vote for the NBA's best sixth man goes to the San Antonio referees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1989
When The Times reported the President's telephone hookup with those gathered for the 16th annual March for Life ("Bush Calls for Reversal of '73 Abortion Ruling," Part I, Jan. 24), the real bombshell of the story was accorded a scant line's attention, buried in the 11th paragraph of a story which was buried on Page 19: " 'America needs a human life amendment,' the President said." A human life amendment?! This is news! To my knowledge, not once in his campaign for the presidency did Bush call for such an amendment.
NEWS
April 14, 1991
Just when I thought it was safe to go back into the water, along comes another article about Christopher Columbus. Anyone determined to date his American landfall needs to consider the fact that our modern Cesarean calendar was not operative in the Spain of Columbus' time, much less on the Santa Maria. Writer Garry Abrams' timetable (Oct. 11, 1492) could be as much as 16 days off. Also: Columbus was reportedly buried in his home town of Genoa, Italy, by his brother, underneath what is now a traffic circle.
OPINION
May 12, 1985
In explaining why he went to Bitburg, Reagan has portrayed the soldiers buried there as victims of Nazism, separating them from the government that used them as instruments of war and terror. But would Reagan be as quick to forgive the soldiers of communism? Can anyone imagine Reagan visiting a North Vietnamese military cemetery, or bowing his head in memory of the Russians who have died in Afghanistan? Of course not, as he would not wish to separate the soldiers from the cause for which they fought.
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1998
Chawton House is technically not Jane Austen's "ancestral home" ("Sandy Lerner, in Your Face," by Renee Tawa, March 1). Austen and her siblings were born at Steventon Rectory, where her father was a poor but gentlemanly rector. Chawton House was part of the Knight family estate. Thomas and Catherine Knight, distant cousins of Austen's father, George, were childless, adopted Austen's brother Edward and made him their heir. Edward acquired the cottage in Chawton village for his widowed mother, Cassandra, and his two spinster sisters, Cassandra and Jane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1994
I'm sorry to see that professor Jenijoy La Belle of Caltech, in the midst of a fine discussion of the past popularity and present obscurity of Gray's "Elegy," has somehow decided to distort its meaning (Commentary, Feb. 16). The poem is not about the lack of importance of class distinctions "in the greater scheme of things." Gray doesn't find the rich and the poor united in death because he sets the poem in a "country churchyard," where only the poor are buried, while the rich are buried inside, under the church floor.
SPORTS
April 3, 1999
While driving home Saturday night, I heard on the radio that the Clippers had stunned the Utah Jazz. "This is great," I said to myself. "I can't wait to read about it in the paper tomorrow." Imagine my surprise to find the story buried on D4, mentioned only at the bottom of the front page. The Clippers are our team, and they deserve better support, if only for the heart they show going up against teams with far more talent. The media can help by giving credit where credit is due. There has certainly been enough criticism after big losses.
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