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Burma Government

NEWS
September 2, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Flag-waving anti-government demonstrators filled the streets of Rangoon on Thursday, sending a message to the embattled Burmese regime but failing to shake its resolve on a timetable for political change. President Maung Maung, speaking over official Rangoon Radio after the streets had cleared, rejected the protesters' demands for an interim government.
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NEWS
September 1, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Protesters against the Burmese government, crisscrossing the capital of Rangoon in loudspeaker-equipped trucks, called Wednesday for mass rallies and a nationwide strike today to press their demand for an interim government. The demonstrations will end a two-day lull in public protests against one-party rule in Burma, where the military-dominated Burma Socialist Program Party has held unchallenged power for more than a quarter century.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Burma's political elders, in a surprise move to promote democracy in the country's grass-roots rebellion, formed an opposition party Monday under the patronage of 81-year-old former Prime Minister U Nu. Spokesman Khaung Nyunt told reporters in Rangoon that the new alliance will join the struggle for a multiparty political system but is not intended as an alternative to the beleaguered government.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Retired Gen. Tin Oo, a former Burmese defense minister whose influence still reaches deep into the ranks of the military, demanded Saturday that the beleaguered government of the ruling Burma Socialist Program Party give way to an interim regime. "The light of democracy is visible, but the final goal has yet to be achieved," the 62-year-old one-time army chief of staff told a cheering rally of 50,000 in downtown Rangoon, the Burmese capital.
NEWS
August 27, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of thousands of Burmese protesters, maintaining their pressure on the reeling regime, virtually shut down the nation on Friday as diplomats expressed deep concern that public order was in peril. As half a million people roamed the streets of the capital of Rangoon, government offices were reported deserted, public services were crippled and air and rail transportation was halted.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Confronted by a widening campaign of civil disobedience, Burma's newly appointed president Wednesday threw his weight behind a restive public's demand for multiparty democracy. "We want liberty, peace and civility," President Maung Maung, who took office just five days ago, declared over Radio Rangoon. "We will not be stubborn any more." He said an emergency session of the ruling, military-dominated Burma Socialist Program Party will be held Sept.
NEWS
August 23, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Tens of thousands of demonstrators filled the streets of Burmese cities Monday, demanding democracy and a new government on the first day of a nationwide general strike, diplomatic and news reports said. Diplomats in the capital of Rangoon said that about 20,000 people gathered outside the Rangoon General Hospital, a center of protest, for the largest demonstration there since the street protests of Aug. 8-12 that forced the resignation of hard-line President Sein Lwin.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Atty. Gen. Maung Maung, a close ally of Burma's former strongman Gen. Ne Win, was named the country's president Friday and immediately pleaded for time to make changes to lead his country out of turmoil. But Maung Maung, 63, chosen by the ruling Burma Socialist Program Party after his predecessor Sein Lwin was forced out by popular rebellion, appeared to rule out a multi-party democracy.
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