Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBurma Revolts
IN THE NEWS

Burma Revolts

NEWS
October 4, 1988 | United Press International
Frightened workers returned to their jobs Monday as thousands of Burmese troops patrolled Rangoon threatening reprisals against anyone defying an ultimatum to end a seven-week general strike, witnesses said. Western diplomats estimated that as much as 80% of the capital's labor force complied with the ultimatum, despite pleas from opposition groups not to yield to government pressure.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 15, 1988 | From Reuters
Burma will not be ready to hold general elections, promised by its military rulers, until next year, the military government announced Friday. Aung San Suu Kyi, secretary of the major opposition National League for Democracy, said the election commission in Rangoon briefed officials from 18 parties formed since the army seized power last month. "The commission said it would finish its work by about January.
NEWS
September 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Three opposition leaders declared Friday that they will form a united front to oppose the military government of Gen. Saw Maung, which took power last weekend. The announcement marked the first formal attempt by Aung Gyi, Tin Oo and Aung San Suu Kyi to unite the numerous student, worker and other groups seeking an end to 26 years of autocratic military rule and ruinous economic policies.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Embassy in Rangoon on Wednesday ordered the evacuation of nearly 100 staff dependents after a major outbreak of looting brought the army back into the streets of Burma's capital for the first time in nearly three weeks. Ross Petzing, a spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok, said the 95 dependents are being sent out of Rangoon as a "precautionary measure."
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
About 200 enlisted men of the Burmese air force joined an anti-government rally at Rangoon University this morning, the first time a large group of uniformed military men had taken part in the swelling protests against Burma's government. According to reports from Rangoon, the air force men--sergeants and privates but no officers--apparently sneaked off their base to join students demanding the ouster of Burma's military-dominated regime.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A U.N. relief agency said Saturday that it will airlift 82 tons of emergency medical supplies to Burma, where hospitals are struggling to cope with the casualty toll from a military crackdown on the opposition. A spokesman for the U.N. Children's Fund (UNICEF) said $1 million worth of drugs and essential hospital equipment will be flown to Bangkok from Copenhagen on Tuesday for transshipment to Rangoon.
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Burmese and Thai officials have disputed a State Department report that as many as 50 Burmese students may have died in police custody. "Rumors about arrests and deaths of students in government custody . . . are absolutely unfounded and malicious," Kyaw Sann, a Burmese government spokesman, told reporters in Rangoon on Friday, commenting on a Voice of America account of the State Department charge.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Aung Naing, a 19-year-old apprentice mechanic with what passes for the punk look in Burma, is in good standing with the law, but he's got a bit of trouble with his parents. The youth, who goes by the alias Ya Coot, took to the streets in nearby Mandalay last summer when anti-government demonstrations swept the country. When the military took power in September, he fled to the jungles, fearing arrest.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|