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Burros

NEWS
March 15, 1987 | ANN JAPENGA, Times Staff Writer
May many another youth be by me inspired to leave the smug safety of his rut and follow fortune to other lands. --Everett Ruess, writing at age 19 Amid the arrests and auto thefts reported in the Los Angeles Police Department bulletin for Sept. 4, 1935, one item seems out of place. It's too romantic, too mysterious to belong on a police ledger.
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SPORTS
December 14, 2003 | Ben Bolch;Mayar Zokaei;Elia Powers
His options limited at running back with Cameron Lonzo sidelined because of a broken ankle, Fontana Kaiser Coach Dick Bruich turned to hulking defensive lineman Bernard Afutiti. The 6-foot-2, 225-pound junior, typically reserved for short-yardage situations, responded with 93 yards rushing and four touchdowns in 16 carries Saturday at Fontana High to lead Kaiser to its second consecutive Southern Section Division VIII football title with a 41-31 victory over Ridgecrest Burroughs.
NEWS
January 8, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Interior Department ordered an investigation into whether government employees were profiting from a federal wild horse protection program, including selling some of the animals to slaughterhouses. The Interior investigation, as well as a senator saying he might ask for congressional hearings, was prompted by an Associated Press report outlining abuses within the wild horse and burro protection program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2001
The owner of a team of pack animals that has served cabins in the San Gabriel Mountains for more than 60 years reached an agreement Thursday with the U.S. Forest Service, ending a dispute that had many residents worried the team would be gone by the end of the month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
A wild donkey rescued by a federal program and adopted by Centennial Farm at the Orange County Fairgrounds soon will give birth. Sugar, a 4-year-old white burro, is expected to deliver the farm's first donkey foal in mid-October after an 11-month pregnancy. She was acquired through the federal Bureau of Land Management, which rounds up wild horses and donkeys that proliferate too quickly. When Sugar was rescued in 1995, she was with an inbred foal that later died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 60 years, cabin owners in Big Santa Anita Canyon have relied on a team of mules and donkeys to lug supplies from the last stretch of paved road above Arcadia to their own steep, rocky recesses in the San Gabriel Mountains. The pack animals stabled at Chantry Flat are more than just a romantic holdover from a bygone era.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2010 | By Elaine Woo
Jaime Escalante, the charismatic former East Los Angeles high school teacher who taught the nation that inner-city students could master subjects as demanding as calculus, died Tuesday. He was 79. The subject of the 1988 film "Stand and Deliver," Escalante died at his son's home in Roseville, Calif., said actor Edward James Olmos, who portrayed the teacher in the film. Escalante had bladder cancer. "Jaime didn't just teach math. Like all great teachers, he changed lives," Olmos said earlier this month when he organized an appeal for funds to help pay Escalante's mounting medical bills.
TRAVEL
December 4, 2005 | Patricia Connell
Chandler, Ariz. Opening Dec. 15: After 35 years in Scottsdale, the Old West theme town of Rawhide is moving to Wild Horse Pass, a Gila River Indian Community development just south of Phoenix. (The area already is home to Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort.) A replica of an 1880s frontier town, Rawhide claims to be "more excitin' than a bronco in a beehive," with cowboys, rides (burro, camel, mechanical bull, stagecoach), rock-climbing, gold panning, shopping and dining.
TRAVEL
September 22, 1985
I thank Jerry for his very interesting article on Cripple Creek. My mother visited her uncle there, who was circuit judge for many years in the late 1800s and early 1900s. We visited Cripple Creek and Victor in 1956. It had been 50 years since mother had been there, and she could hardly imagine that this was the same place. We drove over to Victor and saw one human being and one dog. The drive up from Colorado Springs is indeed a sight one won't forget, but much time was saved returning on the highway.
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