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Burt Lancaster

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1994
A few years ago our son Bob was in Cedars-Sinai Hospital terminally ill. We were pushing him around in his wheelchair when we recognized Burt Lancaster approaching. We asked him to pose with Bob and he agreed. Thank you, Burt, for giving us great entertainment--and thanks for posing with our son. You were a fine artist and a true gentleman. DARLYNE and BOB HOLLIDAY Santa Monica
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Susan King
Kirk Douglas will be paying tribute to his old friend and frequent co-star Burt Lancaster at the UCLA Film & Television Archive's June 7 screening of their classic 1957 western, “Gunfight at the O.K. Corral” at the Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood. “Gunfight at the O.K. Corral” is part of the archive's “Burt Lancaster: A Centennial Celebration” films series. Directed by John Sturges, the western was the second on-screen pairing of the two tough guys. Lancaster plays Wyatt Earp and Douglas is his friend, Doc Holiday, the alcoholic dentist, gunfighter and gambler who had tuberculosis. Rhonda Fleming, Oscar-winner Jo Van Fleet and young Dennis Hopper also star in the film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Susan King
The spotlight shines this week on legendary film stars Debbie Reynolds, Burt Lancaster and Montgomery Clift. Reynolds, who turned 81 on Monday and has a new book coming out, "Unsinkable," came to fame in the 1950s and is still going strong.  American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre is celebrating the musical-comedy star with "A Hollywood Life: The Unsinkable Debbie Reynolds" retrospective. It starts Thursday evening with the 1955 romantic comedy "The Tender Trap" with  Frank Sinatra and the 1963 comedy "Mary, Mary" with Barry Nelson.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Susan King
The spotlight shines this week on legendary film stars Debbie Reynolds, Burt Lancaster and Montgomery Clift. Reynolds, who turned 81 on Monday and has a new book coming out, "Unsinkable," came to fame in the 1950s and is still going strong.  American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre is celebrating the musical-comedy star with "A Hollywood Life: The Unsinkable Debbie Reynolds" retrospective. It starts Thursday evening with the 1955 romantic comedy "The Tender Trap" with  Frank Sinatra and the 1963 comedy "Mary, Mary" with Barry Nelson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1990 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Burt Lancaster has been released from Los Alamitos Hospital and transfered to an undisclosed location, where he is undergoing extensive physical and speech therapy, hospital officials said Friday. The 77-year-old Academy Award winner left the hospital Thursday, but officials declined to state where he went or what his condition was when he was released. Ben Benjamin, Lancaster's publicist, said the actor's family has requested that no information about his whereabouts be released.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The well-nigh magical power of a charismatic first-magnitude star to sustain a film despite its difficulties has seldom been better demonstrated than by Burt Lancaster in "Rocket Gibraltar." The story, written by Amos Poe and directed by Daniel Petrie, is a sweet-natured family tale, with Lancaster as a 77-year-old grandfather presiding over a birthday ingathering of a bewildering assortment of sons, daughters, spouses and grandchildren.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Burt Lancaster was the first movie star I ever met. I've encountered others since, but the circumstances have never been so dramatic. The year was 1971 and I was a young reporter for the Washington Post covering the Cannes Film Festival on my own dime. Few Americans made the trek in those days, which is why Lancaster's publicist contacted me and asked if I wanted to be part of a small lunch the actor was giving for journalists at the glamorous Hotel du Cap, a legendary spot perched just above imposing rocks that jut boldly into the Mediterranean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU
Actor Burt Lancaster remained in stable condition Sunday night at the Los Alamitos Medical Center following a moderate stroke last week that left him with some weakness and speech problems, a nursing supervisor said. The 77-year-old Academy Award winner had been visiting a friend at a Los Alamitos center for Alzheimer's patients on Friday morning when he was felled by the stroke and rushed to the medical center, just a block away.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
In the early '80s, for a time, most American movies seemed to have forgotten that families existed. That's why "Rocket Gibraltar" (selected theaters), for all its flaws and lacks, is such a heartening film. As written by Amos Poe, directed by Daniel Petrie and acted by a large, dedicated cast, this film helps return the American family to its movie imagination.
NEWS
October 22, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Burt Lancaster, the performer, producer, gymnast and iconoclast--who from his earliest beginnings was always a star--has died, his wife announced Friday. The 80-year-old Academy Award winner and onetime top athlete had been in failing health since suffering a stroke nearly four years ago. He died overnight Thursday of a heart attack in their Century City condominium, Susan Lancaster said, adding that there will be no funeral and that burial will be private.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Burt Lancaster was the first movie star I ever met. I've encountered others since, but the circumstances have never been so dramatic. The year was 1971 and I was a young reporter for the Washington Post covering the Cannes Film Festival on my own dime. Few Americans made the trek in those days, which is why Lancaster's publicist contacted me and asked if I wanted to be part of a small lunch the actor was giving for journalists at the glamorous Hotel du Cap, a legendary spot perched just above imposing rocks that jut boldly into the Mediterranean.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
At last year's Academy Awards, the two Oscar-nominated songs got short shrift - they weren't even performed on the telecast. There will be no such exclusion on the 85th Oscar ceremony on Feb. 24 because the show's producers, Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, are bringing music back to the Academy Awards in a big way. It's not surprising: Zadan and Meron were the producers of 2002's "Chicago," the last musical to win the best-picture Oscar. To carry out their mission, Zadan and Meron have enlisted some big names to sing on the telecast, such as Barbra Streisand and James Bond chanteuse Shirley Bassey ("Goldfinger," "Diamonds Are Forever")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2012
Geraldine Washington Former head of NAACP's L.A. chapter Geraldine Washington, 81, an educator and civil rights activist who led the Los Angeles chapter of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People for 14 years, died of natural causes Thursday in Los Angeles, according to her family. Washington was president of the NAACP's Los Angeles chapter from 1995 to 2009. She was particularly known for her activism on issues involving education and police hiring and misconduct.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2011
What Oscar-winning actor known for his tough guy, athletic roles made his Broadway debut in the short-lived 1945 play "A Sound of Hunting"? Burt Lancaster
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2011
George Kirby Kirby excelled as Nat King Cole, Count Basie, Louis Armstrong and even Ella Fitzgerald. Marilyn Michaels Impressions of singers Connie Francis, Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand and Ethel Merman are her forte. Frank Gorshin Gorshin was the first impressionist to become a headliner imitating such stars as Burt Lancaster and George Burns.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2011
'From Here to Eternity' The hot-and-heavy clinch on the beach between illicit lovers Burt Lancaster and Deborah Kerr as waves engulf them in the 1953 Oscar-winning drama "From Here to Eternity" still epitomizes erotic sizzle. 'Breakfast at Tiffany's' Audrey Hepburn's Holly Golightly is reunited with her lover (George Peppard) and the missing cat (Orangey) ? the "poor slob without a name" ? in the rain-drenched, tear-inducing conclusion of 1961's romantic classic "Breakfast at Tiffany's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
William W. ("Bill") Norton, a successful screenwriter whose post- Hollywood life took a turn as dramatic as the fast-paced action movies he once wrote when he became a gunrunner for rebels in Northern Ireland, died Oct. 2 in Santa Barbara. He was 85. The cause of death was a heart aneurysm, said his son, television director Bill L. Norton. Norton was best known for writing "The Scalphunters" (1968), a comedy-western directed by Sydney Pollack and starring Burt Lancaster and Ossie Davis.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2008 | Susan King
Want to see some films from women on the verge of bigger things? The American Film Institute's Directing Workshop for Women presents eight new movies from the graduating class of 2007 on Monday at the Harmony Gold Theatre in L.A. One of the selections, "The Winged Man," directed by Marya Mazor, was chosen to screen at Cannes. . . . Where were you in '73? If you're of a certain age, probably at the local theater checking out George Lucas' classic "American Graffiti," starring Cindy Williams and Ron Howard (pictured)
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