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January 25, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Burt Reynolds found himself in in the ICU on Friday after being hospitalized with a nasty case of the flu. The "Boogie Nights" and "Smokey and the Bandit" actor was placed in intensive care because he was "severely dehydrated," a rep told TMZ . Later in the day, the 76-year-old was "doing better," his representative, Erik Kritzer, told CNN , and Reynolds was expected to be moved back to a regular hospital room once he'd received more...
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Susan King, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom.
TCM Classic Film Festival announced Wednesday that Burt Reynolds and Malcolm McDowell have been added to the roster at the four-day event, which takes place April 25-28 in Hollywood. Reynolds and director John Boorman will join previously announced Jon Voight for a screening of the 1972 classic "Deliverance," while McDowell will discuss James Cagney's Oscar-winning performance as George M. Cohan at the screening of 1942's "Yankee Doodle Dandy. " Oscar-nominated director Rob Marshall is set to appear at the screening of the 1949 musical "On the Town.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2000 | STEVE HARVEY
Author Marty Elkort notes that I gave an incomplete account of the story of Clint Eastwood's rejection by a Universal Pictures exec in 1959. The incident was taken from the book with the facetious title "The Experts Speak," by Christopher Cerf and Victor Navasky, which recounted how the young Eastwood was told: "You have a chip on your tooth, your Adam's apple sticks out too far, and you talk too slow."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Burt Reynolds found himself in in the ICU on Friday after being hospitalized with a nasty case of the flu. The "Boogie Nights" and "Smokey and the Bandit" actor was placed in intensive care because he was "severely dehydrated," a rep told TMZ . Later in the day, the 76-year-old was "doing better," his representative, Erik Kritzer, told CNN , and Reynolds was expected to be moved back to a regular hospital room once he'd received more...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1986
A new game show modeled after a charades game that Burt Reynolds plays with pals at his home is on the boards for next fall. "Win, Lose or Draw" will be produced by Reynolds, Bert Convy and Richard S. Kline and syndicated to stations by Walt Disney Studio's Buena Vista Television division. To be taped before a live audience, the show will pit celebrity guests and contestants against each other in teams of three men and three women.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | Bill Carter, The Baltimore Sun
Reynolds, who takes great pride in puncturing the pretensions of his Palm Beach neighbors in real life, intends to make that an ongoing theme of the series. At one point in the not distant past, the news that Burt Reynolds was making a TV series would have been the story of the year in the medium. Of course, things are different for Reynolds now, and his series "B. L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1994
Actor Burt Reynolds said his net worth has dropped from $7.5 million to $2 million in the red in six months. Until he can make a comeback, he said, he cannot afford the $15,000 a month he pays in child support. "Like every American, I'm having a cash-flow problem right now," Reynolds testified Monday at a custody and child-support hearing in Superior Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1999
A man already charged with stealing from widows and orphans of Los Angeles police officers has been charged with stealing from actor Burt Reynolds. William Patrick Bentley, 39, was charged Wednesday with forging Reynolds' signature on a $20,000 check. Bentley also was charged with stealing $24,000 from Reynolds' ex-wife, actress Loni Anderson, and the Suarez Corp., in 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1987 | CRAIG MODDERNO
This isn't the good ol' Burt Reynolds that we have come to know and love. Yes, he looks like the same starkly handsome, wisecracking Reynolds--but there's an unusual hunger about him. He has paraded his problems, medical and otherwise, on TV talk shows with a candor that is unusual for a star of his magnitude. And his career as a movie star is in some kind of chaos. By his own admission, he's been his own worst enemy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1993 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Burt Reynolds directs as well as stars in the TV movie "The Man From Left Field" (at 9 tonight on CBS, Channels 2 and 8), which seems skewed toward grade-schoolers, despite an air time that ends past most of their bedtimes. About the best thing you can say about it is that, terrible as it is, it's the least of Reynolds' problems right now. Don't let the sight of the star in the vicinity of a playing field bring back any happy memories of "The Longest Yard."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2012 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Larry L. King, a writer and playwright whose magazine article about a campaign to close down a popular bordello became the hit Broadway musical "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas" and a 1982 movie starring Burt Reynolds, died Thursday. He was 83. King, who had emphysema, died at a retirement home in Washington, D.C., where he had lived for six months, said his wife, Barbara Blaine. He wrote his most famous piece, about the demise of the Chicken Ranch brothel in Texas, in 1974 for Playboy magazine.
HEALTH
September 15, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Boot camps before meetings? Yoga classes at lunch? Workouts near or at work are convenient and efficient. But if you happen to be employed at Warner Bros. in Burbank, there's more to it than accessibility. On Fridays when the sitcom "Mike & Molly" isn't shooting, actor Reno Wilson teaches a 45-minute spinning class to anyone on the lot who shows up; many of his students are staff and crew from his show. Wilson leads spinning classes for love. Yes, he has a love of spinning, but it's more about his love for the student who was front and center at one recent class: his wife, Coco Fausone-Wilson, a yoga and spinning instructor at YAS Fitness Centers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2010
MONDAY'S HIGHLIGHTS SERIES Lie to Me: Torres' half sister is incarcerated in a juvenile corrections facility in this new episode (8 p.m. Fox). Behind the Music: Usher is profiled in this new episode (8 p.m. VH1). True Beauty: Judges Vanessa Minnillo, Carson Kressley and Beth Ostrosky Stern let the remaining contestants in on the secret of the competition and reveal which one of them is the most beautiful on the outside and inside in the season finale (10 p.m. ABC)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Dom DeLuise, the mirthful, moon-faced comic actor who provided frequent comedic support in television variety shows of the 1960s and '70s and in movies starring Mel Brooks and Burt Reynolds, has died. He was 75. DeLuise died Monday evening at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, said DeLuise's agent, Robert Malcolm. DeLuise's wife and three sons were with him when he died. The family did not release the cause of death.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2009
Your list of the best football movies ever made featured a lot of classics ("First and 10," Feb. 1), but you left off the greatest of them all: Michael Ritchie's 1977 comedy "Semi-Tough". This charming triangle about two football players (Burt Reynolds and Kris Kristofferson) and the woman they love (Jill Clayburgh) is filled with fascinating insider details about the game, and it combines romantic comedy and sports action in a manner that wouldn't be topped until Ron Shelton made "Bull Durham" 11 years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
Prison films and sports movies define guy cinema, and "The Longest Yard," directed by Robert Aldrich, is the sinewy synthesis of the two, like "Cool Hand Luke" but with Joe Namath on the chain gang. This movie found the perfect star in Burt Reynolds under center (in comparison, Adam Sandler in the 2005 remake seemed like, well, a waterboy). Reynolds was at the height of his good ol' boy cinema, following up on "Deliverance" and "White Lighting" and still in possession of that virile menace that he would later trade for Southern slapstick.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1988 | DONALD CHASE
Can this really be Burt Reynolds, skating shakily around a suburban roller rink in a $5.5-million picture for which he's being paid . . . Guild scale? Is he cashing out his stardom? Has this fatherhood business (he and wife Loni Anderson are just adopting an infant) gone to his head? Is he slowing down? His belly is decidedly convex; his tweed jacket, gray work pants and burgundy print shirt have seen better days; his hair, more gray than dark, is flat on the scalp, which peeps pinkly through.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Burt Reynolds says he is financially down--his net worth dropping from $7.5 million to $2 million in the hole in six months--and until he can make a comeback, he can't afford the $15,000 a month he pays in child support. "Like every American, I'm having a cash-flow problem right now," Reynolds testified Monday at a custody and child-support hearing in Superior Court.
SPORTS
January 25, 2009 | Sam Farmer
In the locker room after the game, Al Davis approached guard Mickey Marvin, and the 6-foot-4, 270-pound player -- sobbing like a baby -- smothered him with a bearhug and whispered something in his ear. "You know what he said to me?" Davis said later, smiling broadly. "Just dominate." Nose tackle Reggie Kinlaw, who was deemed "just average" in the pregame analysis by Pro Football Weekly, was considered the game's most valuable player by some experts for his role in shutting down Washington's vaunted running game.
FOOD
October 22, 2008 | Charlie Amter
Saints & Sinners lounge owner Bobby Green has turned the former under-attended Johnny's space on Sunset Boulevard into Stinkers, a truck stop-themed watering hole that opens early next month (most likely Nov. 7). Nearly 5,000 vintage aluminum beer cans (think Hamm's, Olympia, Ballantine's, etc.) line the walls. Throw in a few 1970s posters of Burt Reynolds, a chandelier made from 1970s beer can pull tabs and a hood from a 1978 Trans Am and you have the makings of a bar that Bo "Bandit" Darville would approve of. But the most talked about design feature at Stinkers will surely be the mechanized skunks that line the top of the bar. Green has the stuffed, backward-facing skunks rigged so that when a bartender pulls a cord, steam will come out of their respective backsides.
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