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NEWS
May 15, 1985 | From Reuters
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi on Tuesday began his first visit to Burundi since the two countries signed a cooperation treaty in 1973.
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TRAVEL
December 4, 2011
Thailand Receding floodwaters after record monsoons are revealing new Bangkok residents: crocodiles. The country is a center of trafficking in exotic animals, especially crocs. Burundi The State Department has renewed its travel warning for Burundi, noting that the country's participation in peacekeeping in Somalia has made it a target of Somali terrorist organization Shabab. The World People should prepare for "unprecedented extreme weather," a new U.N. report says.
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NEWS
August 10, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Rwanda severed air and road links with Burundi, completing a circle of isolation around the Central African country in an effort to force out military leaders who seized power last month. Rwanda joined Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda, which had already imposed sanctions, suspended air traffic and blocked shipments to and from Burundi. Zaire closed its border with Burundi in April because of disputes. In Washington, the U.S.
NEWS
March 30, 2008 | Todd Pitman, Associated Press
Her first son was born 10 years ago on a Bujumbura street while fighting raged. She named him Nzikobanyanka, or "I know they hate us." Two successive sons were also christened with names reflecting weariness with Burundi's long war: Tugiramahoro ("Let's have peace") and Nduwimana ("I'm in God's hands"). But when the fighting stopped and Daphrose Miburu's youngest son was born a year ago, the 35-year-old mother chose something uplifting: Furaha -- "Happiness." The history of this battered nation can be told through names like these, given to reflect the world as parents see it at the time.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | Associated Press
Soldiers in the small African country of Burundi ousted President Jean-Baptiste Bagaza on Thursday while he was out of the country and set up a ruling junta under an army major, official Burundi radio reported. Bagaza, a 41-year-old socialist with ties to Moscow, was in Quebec attending a summit meeting of French-speaking nations. He left the summit Thursday when rumors of a coup began circulating and took a plane for Paris.
WORLD
August 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Survivors of a massacre at a U.N.-run refugee camp buried 163 Congolese Tutsis in a dusty cotton field Monday, some fainting in the hot sun as the simple wooden coffins were lowered into a mass grave. Some of them wept as others told of narrow escapes as Hutu marauders rampaged through the Gatumba camp, screaming that they would kill any Tutsi they found.
NEWS
March 30, 2008 | Todd Pitman, Associated Press
Her first son was born 10 years ago on a Bujumbura street while fighting raged. She named him Nzikobanyanka, or "I know they hate us." Two successive sons were also christened with names reflecting weariness with Burundi's long war: Tugiramahoro ("Let's have peace") and Nduwimana ("I'm in God's hands"). But when the fighting stopped and Daphrose Miburu's youngest son was born a year ago, the 35-year-old mother chose something uplifting: Furaha -- "Happiness." The history of this battered nation can be told through names like these, given to reflect the world as parents see it at the time.
WORLD
September 4, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Investigators have linked a recent massacre at a Burundian refugee camp to Hutu rebels operating with armed groups from Rwanda and Congo, according to a preliminary U.N. report. Secretary-General Kofi Annan recently cited reports that the Burundian rebel National Liberation Force, which has claimed responsibility for the Aug. 13 massacre, operated in alliance with Congolese tribal fighters known as Mai Mai, and Rwandan Hutu rebels.
NEWS
April 17, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Burundi's feuding parties have agreed to attend a conference organized by Africa's elder statesman, former Tanzanian President Julius K. Nyerere, in an effort to stop ethnic bloodshed, the U.N. announced. The meeting, scheduled for Monday in Tanzania, is aimed at stopping killing that has claimed more than 300 lives in the past two weeks alone.
WORLD
August 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
Attackers with machetes and automatic weapons raided a U.N. refugee camp in western Burundi late Friday, hacking and shooting to death about 190 men, women and children, U.N. officials said. Burundian Hutu rebels claimed responsibility, insisting that the camp for Congolese Tutsi refugees fleeing tribal fighting was a hide-out for Burundian soldiers and Congolese tribal militiamen. But most of the victims appeared to be women and children.
WORLD
June 24, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A Russian diplomat was shot dead outside the capital, Bujumbura, when he tried to drive through a roadblock, the army said. Vladimir Rushtiko was killed as soldiers shot at his car's tires, an army spokesman said. A Russian official in Bujumbura said Rushtiko had just completed his mission. No details were released.
WORLD
May 19, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A group of 88 Burundians who have lived as refugees in neighboring Tanzania for as long as 35 years became the first of about 8,500 to head to the United States for a new life. The U.N. refugee agency in Geneva said the Burundians flew from Kibondo Camp in Tanzania to the Kenyan capital, Nairobi. From there they will continue to various cities in the United States, including Atlanta and Phoenix. The U.S. State Department has said the refugees will be given the option of applying for
WORLD
June 18, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
President Pierre Nkurunziza left for neighboring Tanzania to sign a cease-fire agreement with a rebel group, the Forces for National Liberation, or FNL, as his government works to end Burundi's 12-year war, an aide said. The FNL is the only Hutu rebel group that has rejected a series of peace deals.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
WHEN the generic description "police procedural" attaches itself to a novel, Sweden is hardly the location that comes immediately to mind. This after all is the country whose authorities still haven't really figured out who gunned down then-Prime Minister Olof Palme and his wife as they walked home from a movie on a wintry Saturday night in 1986.
WORLD
May 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Burundi's president signed a truce with the Hutu rebels, boosting efforts to end the tiny African country's decade-long civil war, witnesses said. President Domitien Ndayizeye and Agathon Rwasa, leader of the Hutu Forces for National Liberation, signed the cessation of hostilities pact after their first face-to-face talks in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Burundi is emerging from 12 years of war between majority Hutus against the politically dominant Tutsi minority.
WORLD
March 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Burundians voted overwhelmingly to adopt a power-sharing constitution guaranteeing majority rule and minority rights in the Central African country, officials said. Paul Ngarambe, electoral commission chief, said 90% of voters turned out Monday and more than 91% of them approved the new constitution, which reserves 60% of government and parliament seats for Hutus and 40% for Tutsis.
WORLD
August 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
The Security Council condemned the massacre of at least 150 Congolese refugees at a U.N. camp in Burundi and demanded Sunday that those responsible be brought to justice "without delay." The condemnation came as the death toll in Friday's attack on the camp in Gatumba, Burundi, near the Congo border, was revised downward; initial reports put the number slain at nearly 190.
WORLD
December 4, 2002 | From Reuters
The government of Burundi and one of two main rebel forces signed a cease-fire Tuesday to try to end a nine-year war, and African leaders told the other group to stop fighting or face sanctions. The cease-fire deal struck by the government and the Forces for the Defense of Democracy rebel group, or FDD, followed months of haggling.
WORLD
September 4, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Investigators have linked a recent massacre at a Burundian refugee camp to Hutu rebels operating with armed groups from Rwanda and Congo, according to a preliminary U.N. report. Secretary-General Kofi Annan recently cited reports that the Burundian rebel National Liberation Force, which has claimed responsibility for the Aug. 13 massacre, operated in alliance with Congolese tribal fighters known as Mai Mai, and Rwandan Hutu rebels.
WORLD
August 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Survivors of a massacre at a U.N.-run refugee camp buried 163 Congolese Tutsis in a dusty cotton field Monday, some fainting in the hot sun as the simple wooden coffins were lowered into a mass grave. Some of them wept as others told of narrow escapes as Hutu marauders rampaged through the Gatumba camp, screaming that they would kill any Tutsi they found.
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