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NEWS
March 26, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
To expect that one dependent upon his daily wage for the necessities of life will stand peacefully by and see a man employed in his stead is to expect too much. --Industrialist Andrew Carnegie "Why take it out on the passengers?" Mark Lawson demanded last week after somebody fired a small-caliber rifle at a Greyhound bus that was carrying him and 50 other people between Roanoke and Christiansburg, Va.
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NEWS
October 18, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Metropolitan Transportation Authority buses will be back in service this morning for the first time in more than a month after an all-night round of negotiations, ending Tuesday morning and brokered by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, finally settled the third-longest transit strike in Los Angeles' history. The deal, unanimously approved by the MTA board, was ratified Tuesday night by 92% of the members of the United Transportation Union who voted.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 150 bus drivers for Foothill Transit, the county's second-largest bus operator, walked off the job Thursday, causing longer waits and overcrowding on buses that ferry riders around the San Gabriel Valley and bring commuters to downtown Los Angeles. "By the time I got to the bus stop, the lines were really long," said county worker Yolanda Del Valle, whose husband ended up driving her to work downtown from West Covina.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miguel Contreras has his hands around the neck of the mayor, whose eyes are wide with mock terror. In the next frame, Mayor Richard Riordan is wringing Contreras' neck, while the leader of the County Federation of Labor feigns a gasping last breath. Shot two years ago and fondly displayed in Contreras' office, the photos took on new meaning in the tense days that led to Tuesday's settlement of the bus drivers' strike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since the crippling Metropolitan Transportation Authority strike began 12 days ago, the agency's directors repeatedly have argued agency's high labor costs have pushed the price of operating its buses to unacceptable levels. According to the transit agency's officials, the cost of labor and benefits accounts for 70% of the $98.66 per hour it takes to operate an MTA bus.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | United Press International
No criminal charges will be filed in the death of a striking Greyhound driver who was crushed by a bus March 3 while picketing outside the Redding bus terminal, Shasta County Dist. Atty. Stephen Carlton said Thursday. Carlton said the death of Robert Waterhouse was a "tragic accident," not the result of malice or negligence by the operator of the bus, replacement driver Theodore Graham Jr., 42, of Portland, Ore.
NEWS
October 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Bus drivers in Phoenix have gone on strike after the Amalgamated Transit Union local rejected the Phoenix Transit System's latest contract, leaving an estimated 110,000 people who depend on the mass transit system each workweek without a ride. "There are no negotiation meetings scheduled at this point," said Abbie Fink, a spokeswoman for Phoenix Transit. Phoenix Transit is a private firm that runs the bus service for the city and surrounding metropolitan area.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
After five weeks, the Greyhound bus strike has become a war of attrition that may eventually resemble the Eastern Airlines strike, where workers virtually gave up any short-term hope of getting their jobs back and aimed instead for the financial destruction of their company. In such a scenario, Greyhound would operate indefinitely as a shrunken, non-union company using permanently hired replacement workers.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The critical issue driving the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and its bus drivers toward a strike early Friday is management's more-work-for-less-pay proposal, which envisions some drivers working four 10-hour days each week without overtime. With the bus drivers union calling the proposal totally unacceptable--and the MTA refusing to withdraw it--the issue of longer workdays for less pay has driven the nation's second-largest bus system to the brink of a devastating strike.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | Associated Press
A bullet tore through a bus run by strike-beset Greyhound Lines Inc. in Florida on Sunday, showering passengers with glass and debris and injuring at least seven people, authorities said. The attack apparently involved just one shot, a sheriff's spokesman said. Although none of the injuries appeared life-threatening, two people underwent surgery for shrapnel wounds in the throat and side, and all seven were taken to hospitals, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT and RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As elected officials, news reporters, transit agency policy wonks and others teetered on the verge of exhaustion after a marathon 24-hour negotiating session early Tuesday morning, the Rev. Jesse Jackson literally ran from room to room in the Pasadena Hilton, pulled by his faith that a settlement in the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's 32-day strike was within reach. "I felt it would be irresponsible to walk out with less than victory," Jackson said. At 6 a.m.
NEWS
October 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Bus drivers in Phoenix have gone on strike after the Amalgamated Transit Union local rejected the Phoenix Transit System's latest contract, leaving an estimated 110,000 people who depend on the mass transit system each workweek without a ride. "There are no negotiation meetings scheduled at this point," said Abbie Fink, a spokeswoman for Phoenix Transit. Phoenix Transit is a private firm that runs the bus service for the city and surrounding metropolitan area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000 | LAURA WIDES and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Negotiators for striking bus drivers met again Saturday with Metropolitan Transportation Authority executives, hoping the presence of the Rev. Jesse Jackson and a willingness by both sides to reach a deal would bring an end to the lengthy bus and rail strike. "I'm hoping that by this time [today] or by this time Monday, this matter will be done and the buses will be running," said James A. Williams, chairman of the drivers' United Transportation Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed in a color-coordinated dark- and light-blue bus driver's uniform, Ruby Holmes, a single mother and bus driver for 17 years, rushed up to strike leader James A. Williams and gave him a big hug. "Thank you," she said, moments after Williams gave an impassioned speech at a City Hall rally. The hug went beyond the dollars and cents issues at stake in the bus and rail operators' strike against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, now in its fifth week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Energized by the intervention of the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Metropolitan Transportation Authority officials and union leaders vowed Friday to work through this weekend to negotiate an end to the crippling transit strike that has shut down the nation's second-largest bus system for almost a month. The new willingness to bargain seriously came only hours before striking bus and train operators voted unanimously to reject the MTA's "last, best and final" contract offer, made earlier this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority took their case directly to striking bus and rail operators Thursday after union leaders rejected a proposed contract that included a sweetened three-year, 10% pay hike for full-time drivers.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miguel Contreras has his hands around the neck of the mayor, whose eyes are wide with mock terror. In the next frame, Mayor Richard Riordan is wringing Contreras' neck, while the leader of the County Federation of Labor feigns a gasping last breath. Shot two years ago and fondly displayed in Contreras' office, the photos took on new meaning in the tense days that led to Tuesday's settlement of the bus drivers' strike.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A striking Greyhound bus driver, picketing outside the company's terminal in Redding, was crushed to death Saturday morning when an Oregon-bound bus driven by a replacement driver pinned him against a concrete wall, authorities said. Several union members said they tried unsuccessfully to stop the bus after it hit the man. The replacement driver motored out of the city before stopping and flagging down a passing police officer. He was returned to Redding for questioning but not arrested.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Both sides in the 4-week-old Metropolitan Transportation Authority strike have fired warning shots at each other over the last 24 hours, promising an escalation in a bitter conflict that is already setting new standards in the stormy history of Los Angeles transit walkouts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the strike against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority reached its 24th day Monday, leaders of the bus drivers union alleged that management is trying to prolong the walkout by reducing the proposed pay hike in its latest offer. With the parties at a stalemate, the drivers' United Transportation Union said the latest proposal from the MTA seems to show a hardening of the agency's position. "They are now offering us 25% less than a week ago," said Goldy Norton, spokesman for the union.
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