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Bush Doctrine

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OPINION
September 19, 2005
Re "The Bush Doctrine, unpacked," Opinion, Sept. 16 According to David Gelernter, the end of the Cold War freed us from the need to prop up U.S.-friendly tyrants and presented a perfect opportunity to topple (selected) others opposed to free markets and democracy. I suggest the end of the Cold War dried up our market for military machinery and threatened to put us out of the "lord and protector" business. In one way or another, we had to redivide the world so there would always be conflict and need.
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OPINION
September 22, 2008 | John Kenney, John Kenney is a writer in New York.
Charles Gibson: Do you agree with the Bush Doctrine? [brief pause] Gov. Sarah Palin: In what respect, Charlie? C.G.: ... What do you interpret it to be? S.P.: His worldview? C.G.: No, the Bush Doctrine, enunciated September 2002, before the Iraq war. -- From "ABC World News" anchor Gibson's interview with the Republican vice presidential nominee, broadcast Sept. 11. Charles Gibson: Do you agree with the Bush Doctrine? [brief pause] John Kenney: I'm not sure I understand the question. C.G.
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OPINION
November 8, 2004 | Thomas Donnelly and Vance Serchuk, Thomas Donnelly and Vance Serchuk are, respectively, resident fellow and research associate at the American Enterprise Institute.
As Americans gathered peaceably to vote on Tuesday, Sudanese soldiers and police were storming the Al Jeer Sureaf refugee camp in the western province of Darfur, beating and tear-gassing its 5,000 inhabitants, burning their makeshift shelters and forcing at least 250 families into trucks for forced relocation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2008 | Daniel Kurtz-Phelan, Special to The Times
Heads in the Sand How the Republicans Screw Up Foreign Policy and Foreign Policy Screws Up the Democrats Matthew Yglesias John Wiley & Sons: 272 pp., $25.95 -- IN June 2002, nine months after the attacks of Sept. 11, George W. Bush went before West Point's graduating class and declared that the world had fundamentally changed -- and that to confront it, American foreign policy would have to fundamentally change as well. "In the world we have entered," Bush said, "the only path to safety is the path of action."
OPINION
September 22, 2008 | John Kenney, John Kenney is a writer in New York.
Charles Gibson: Do you agree with the Bush Doctrine? [brief pause] Gov. Sarah Palin: In what respect, Charlie? C.G.: ... What do you interpret it to be? S.P.: His worldview? C.G.: No, the Bush Doctrine, enunciated September 2002, before the Iraq war. -- From "ABC World News" anchor Gibson's interview with the Republican vice presidential nominee, broadcast Sept. 11. Charles Gibson: Do you agree with the Bush Doctrine? [brief pause] John Kenney: I'm not sure I understand the question. C.G.
OPINION
May 22, 2004
Re "Bush Gains in Efforts to Win Over Jewish Vote," May 19: For the longest time now I have kept my mouth shut. I know, when we're over at a Jewish friend's house or going to some synagogue function, to steer clear of any discussion involving Iraq. My support of President Bush has made me a political pariah. You can imagine how relieved I am to see the thunderous display of affection for our president at his recent speech to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee. As one delegate put it, he is the first president to understand that "the terrorism Israel has had is now the terrorism the U.S. has."
OPINION
March 7, 2004 | James Chace
The Bush doctrine, unveiled by the president in his National Security Strategy paper in the wake of the World Trade Center attacks, called for preemptive military action against "emerging threats before they are fully formed." One year later, President Bush put that controversial doctrine into effect in Iraq. But despite all the noise and fanfare surrounding his embrace of preemptive war, this debate is not a new one.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2005 | Peter Wallsten and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
George Walker Bush, taking the oath of office and opening his second term as president, vowed in a sweeping declaration Thursday that the United States would promote democratic movements "in every nation and culture, with the ultimate goal of ending tyranny in our world." With thousands of U.S. troops fighting in Iraq and public opinion polarized over the policies that put them there, Bush offered few hints about whether his doctrine would mean military action against other countries.
OPINION
October 6, 1991 | Michael Krepon, Michael Krepon is the president of the Henry L. Stimson Center
George Bush, the instinctual conservative with a natural aversion to grandiose ideas, has run roughshod over four decades of encrusted nuclear doctrine. A President who has difficulty with "the vision thing" has set in motion significant changes in the U.S. approach to nuclear weapons, arms-control negotiations and relations with the former Soviet Union.
OPINION
November 21, 2004
Re "Getting Serious in Sudan," editorial, Nov. 17: Although I commend The Times for urging action to stop the genocide in Darfur being carried out by Arab militias with the backing of the Arab government of Sudan, we need to be realistic. This same Arab government killed hundreds of thousands of Africans over the last 20 years. Its troops murder entire male populations of African villages, rape the women and children and take the children as slaves. How has the U.N. responded to these atrocities?
OPINION
February 22, 2008
Re "Political surge in Iraq," editorial, Feb. 18 You mention that the additional 30,000 troops made "tangible steps toward a genuine political reconciliation." You failed to mention that on Jan. 21, The Times reported: "In the last 10 days, the military has dropped nearly 100,000 pounds of explosives on the area, which has been a gateway for Sunni militants into Baghdad." This area includes the village of Arab Jabour. During the Spanish Civil War, the German military dropped 100,000 pounds of bombs on Guernica, Spain, a tragedy that outraged the world.
OPINION
October 14, 2007 | Joshua Muravchik, Joshua Muravchik is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.
Last month, one of the more mysterious episodes in the history of the Arab-Israel conflict began to leak slowly into the news. Although the facts are still unconfirmed, what seems to have happened has major implications not only for the region but even more for the laws of war and preemption that President Bush has been trying to redefine ever since his 2002 national security strategy paper. First, Syrian spokesmen complained that Israeli planes had violated their country's airspace on Sept.
OPINION
May 26, 2006 | Danielle Pletka and Michael Rubin, DANIELLE PLETKA and MICHAEL RUBIN are, respectively, vice president for defense and foreign policy and resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.
LAST WEEK, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced resumption of full U.S. diplomatic relations with Libya, citing Tripoli's renunciation of terrorism and intelligence cooperation. This ends a quarter-century diplomatic freeze. It also marks an effective end to the Bush doctrine. At his second inauguration, President Bush declared: "The survival of liberty in our land increasingly depends on the success of liberty in other lands.
OPINION
November 20, 2005
Did President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney lie? Before the war, I remember reading about the evidence they said proved that Saddam Hussein had a nuclear program and ties to Al Qaeda. I thought at the time that if that's the best they could come up with, with all their access to spy planes, satellites and the CIA, they actually had no real proof. Bush and Cheney either deliberately exaggerated shaky evidence to stampede the public and Congress, which is the same as lying, or they actually believed their own Chicken Little hype, which shows they do not have the good judgment that should be required to send troops into danger.
OPINION
September 19, 2005
Re "The Bush Doctrine, unpacked," Opinion, Sept. 16 According to David Gelernter, the end of the Cold War freed us from the need to prop up U.S.-friendly tyrants and presented a perfect opportunity to topple (selected) others opposed to free markets and democracy. I suggest the end of the Cold War dried up our market for military machinery and threatened to put us out of the "lord and protector" business. In one way or another, we had to redivide the world so there would always be conflict and need.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
President Bush pledged Monday to keep U.S. forces in Iraq "until the fight is won," telling a Fourth of July crowd that he had "a comprehensive strategy" to win the struggle in Iraq and prevail in the global war on terrorism. Making his third Independence Day visit to West Virginia in four years, the president asked Americans to remain patient, saying: "We know that the freedom we defend is meant for all men and women, and for all times.
OPINION
December 15, 2004
Re "Why Academia Shuns Republicans," Commentary, Dec. 10: By far the major reason for the shortage of Republicans as professors at universities is the incestuous hiring practices at the universities. By nature, academia became highly populated with idealists, who tend to be Democrats. The hiring practices of the idealists have been to hire those who mirror their beliefs. Jonathan Chait is trying to make a case that Democrats are more intelligent than Republicans. Knowing how far Chait leans to the left leads me to believe that his own example belies that fact.
OPINION
February 22, 2008
Re "Political surge in Iraq," editorial, Feb. 18 You mention that the additional 30,000 troops made "tangible steps toward a genuine political reconciliation." You failed to mention that on Jan. 21, The Times reported: "In the last 10 days, the military has dropped nearly 100,000 pounds of explosives on the area, which has been a gateway for Sunni militants into Baghdad." This area includes the village of Arab Jabour. During the Spanish Civil War, the German military dropped 100,000 pounds of bombs on Guernica, Spain, a tragedy that outraged the world.
OPINION
February 6, 2005 | MICHAEL KINSLEY
The strangest aspect of President Bush's new War on Tyranny is the connection he draws between tyranny and terrorism. It's not the connection you would suspect, or the one Bush was making during his first term. When Saddam Hussein was still in charge of Iraq, it was enough to say that bad guys are bad guys. A sadistic dictator is just the type of person who would also harbor terrorists and stockpile weapons of mass destruction.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2005 | Peter Wallsten and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
George Walker Bush, taking the oath of office and opening his second term as president, vowed in a sweeping declaration Thursday that the United States would promote democratic movements "in every nation and culture, with the ultimate goal of ending tyranny in our world." With thousands of U.S. troops fighting in Iraq and public opinion polarized over the policies that put them there, Bush offered few hints about whether his doctrine would mean military action against other countries.
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