Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBush S Proposal
IN THE NEWS

Bush S Proposal

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2000
Re "Gore Rejects Bush Offer on Three Debates," Sept. 4: It is time for George W. Bush to stop being a wuss and accept the debates arranged by the bipartisan commission. It is very difficult to assume the mantle of leadership when you look like you're trying to ditch your final exam. The public has often complained about the lack of substance in political campaigns; presidential debates are conducted to address that concern. The debates proposed by the bipartisan commission, similar to those in every election for the last quarter century, ensure fairness and depth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 27, 2004
Re "Bush Seeks Constitutional Ban on Same-Sex Marriage," Feb. 25: Tuesday was one of the blackest days in U.S. history. Our president said the United States and our Constitution should stand not for equality and tolerance but for discrimination and prejudice. David Reisner Los Angeles I am not in favor of gay marriage. I am not opposed to gay marriage. I am not interested in gay marriage. Amend the Constitution? Spare me. Mary A. Rouse Los Angeles My parents' 43-year marriage endured throughout most of my 18-year partnership with my same-sex partner despite many holidays spent together, vacations shared together and anniversaries celebrated together.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
House tax writers today rebuffed President Bush's savings and loan bailout plan and approved an alternative that will add $50 billion to the federal deficit over the next three years. On a 25-11 vote with two of 11 Republicans siding with all its Democrats, the House Ways and Means Committee rejected Bush's proposal for a sale of 30-year bonds to be issued by a new quasi-government agency. The committee approved an amendment by Rep. Sam Gibbons of Florida, the second-ranking Democrat on the committee, that would put the $50-billion immediate taxpayer share of the bailout's costs in the fiscal 1989, 1990 and 1991 budgets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2000
Re "Gore Rejects Bush Offer on Three Debates," Sept. 4: It is time for George W. Bush to stop being a wuss and accept the debates arranged by the bipartisan commission. It is very difficult to assume the mantle of leadership when you look like you're trying to ditch your final exam. The public has often complained about the lack of substance in political campaigns; presidential debates are conducted to address that concern. The debates proposed by the bipartisan commission, similar to those in every election for the last quarter century, ensure fairness and depth.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
With Republicans taking the lead, the House Judiciary Committee voted today to cut by half the increased civil penalties that President Bush wants to impose on fraudulent savings and loan operators and embezzlers. Voting 17 to 14, the committee adopted an amendment by Rep. William J. Hughes (D-N.J.) to reduce the proposed new civil penalties to $500,000 for each violation and to a maximum of $2.5 million against any one individual. As part of his $90-billion S & L bailout package, Bush had sought to raise the civil penalties for defrauding banks, thrifts and other financial institutions backed by federal deposit insurance from the current maximum of $5,000 to $1 million for each violation.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
President Bush's surprise offer to cut 30,000 U.S. troops and associated weapons in Europe would produce relatively small budget savings, U.S. lawmakers and arms control experts said Wednesday, even though the defense of Europe has absorbed more than half of the U.S. defense budget for decades. Bush's proposal could save more than $1 billion per year, mostly in troop pay, experts said. To a deficit-weary Congress eager to find budget savings at the Pentagon, that would provide a welcome benefit, even in a Pentagon budget that is about $300 billion a year.
OPINION
February 16, 1992
Virginia Postrel in her "Column Right" article "Buying a Home For All the Wrong Reasons" (Commentary, Feb. 3) demonstrates once again the narrow vision of the practitioners of George Bush's "voodoo economics," also skeptically known as "trickle down." Those on the bottom of the ladder, and many half-way up, have wondered for years just what was trickling down. Precious few thought it was money. What Postrel fails to note is that for every new home that is bought, a new refrigerator or stove will also be purchased, along with carpets, paint, landscaping, hardware and all the other thousands of items that go into a new residence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1988
Bush's proposal of an essentially affluent youth volunteer program, Youth Engaged in Service, presented on Oct. 4 to a meeting of Sacramento's business leaders, is a prime example of his weakness in dealing with America's social problems. For teen-agers who are not fully occupied by school, working to help support themselves or their families, or baby-sitting younger siblings, there are many existing opportunities to contribute valuable volunteer service. It is up to parents, teachers, community groups, and religious organizations to raise these young people with values that encourage the spirit of volunteerism.
OPINION
February 27, 2004
Re "Bush Seeks Constitutional Ban on Same-Sex Marriage," Feb. 25: Tuesday was one of the blackest days in U.S. history. Our president said the United States and our Constitution should stand not for equality and tolerance but for discrimination and prejudice. David Reisner Los Angeles I am not in favor of gay marriage. I am not opposed to gay marriage. I am not interested in gay marriage. Amend the Constitution? Spare me. Mary A. Rouse Los Angeles My parents' 43-year marriage endured throughout most of my 18-year partnership with my same-sex partner despite many holidays spent together, vacations shared together and anniversaries celebrated together.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - When Jeb Bush sat down last summer to write an ambitious plan to overhaul the immigration system, prominent conservatives were calling for mass deportations as a solution to the problem of having 11 million illegal immigrants in the country. In that environment, the former Florida governor and possible 2016 presidential hopeful came up with a proposal that he felt could bring conservatives to the table while simultaneously luring Latino voters to the GOP. Half a year later, the proposal, fleshed out in a newly released book, has landed in the midst of a radically changed political environment.
OPINION
February 16, 1992
Virginia Postrel in her "Column Right" article "Buying a Home For All the Wrong Reasons" (Commentary, Feb. 3) demonstrates once again the narrow vision of the practitioners of George Bush's "voodoo economics," also skeptically known as "trickle down." Those on the bottom of the ladder, and many half-way up, have wondered for years just what was trickling down. Precious few thought it was money. What Postrel fails to note is that for every new home that is bought, a new refrigerator or stove will also be purchased, along with carpets, paint, landscaping, hardware and all the other thousands of items that go into a new residence.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
President Bush's surprise offer to cut 30,000 U.S. troops and associated weapons in Europe would produce relatively small budget savings, U.S. lawmakers and arms control experts said Wednesday, even though the defense of Europe has absorbed more than half of the U.S. defense budget for decades. Bush's proposal could save more than $1 billion per year, mostly in troop pay, experts said. To a deficit-weary Congress eager to find budget savings at the Pentagon, that would provide a welcome benefit, even in a Pentagon budget that is about $300 billion a year.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
With Republicans taking the lead, the House Judiciary Committee voted today to cut by half the increased civil penalties that President Bush wants to impose on fraudulent savings and loan operators and embezzlers. Voting 17 to 14, the committee adopted an amendment by Rep. William J. Hughes (D-N.J.) to reduce the proposed new civil penalties to $500,000 for each violation and to a maximum of $2.5 million against any one individual. As part of his $90-billion S & L bailout package, Bush had sought to raise the civil penalties for defrauding banks, thrifts and other financial institutions backed by federal deposit insurance from the current maximum of $5,000 to $1 million for each violation.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
House tax writers today rebuffed President Bush's savings and loan bailout plan and approved an alternative that will add $50 billion to the federal deficit over the next three years. On a 25-11 vote with two of 11 Republicans siding with all its Democrats, the House Ways and Means Committee rejected Bush's proposal for a sale of 30-year bonds to be issued by a new quasi-government agency. The committee approved an amendment by Rep. Sam Gibbons of Florida, the second-ranking Democrat on the committee, that would put the $50-billion immediate taxpayer share of the bailout's costs in the fiscal 1989, 1990 and 1991 budgets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1988
Bush's proposal of an essentially affluent youth volunteer program, Youth Engaged in Service, presented on Oct. 4 to a meeting of Sacramento's business leaders, is a prime example of his weakness in dealing with America's social problems. For teen-agers who are not fully occupied by school, working to help support themselves or their families, or baby-sitting younger siblings, there are many existing opportunities to contribute valuable volunteer service. It is up to parents, teachers, community groups, and religious organizations to raise these young people with values that encourage the spirit of volunteerism.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators Thursday announced the takeover of 47 more failed savings and loan institutions, while President Bush urged Congress to act more swiftly on his rescue plan for the industry. The takeovers bring the number of institutions under the control of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. to 165 in 25 states. In the latest action, the agency took over 16 institutions in Texas, 10 in Illinois, nine each in Louisiana and Florida and three in Oklahoma. Their assets totaled $6.8 billion.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|