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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2007 | Duke Helfand and Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke publicly for the first time Monday about the breakup of his 20-year marriage, saying he was responsible for the split even as he refused to talk about what caused it. In a somber meeting with reporters at City Hall, Villaraigosa declined to answer questions about whether the break with his wife, Corina, was triggered by another romantic relationship.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Saturday night is fight night, with the highly anticipated rematch between Manny Pacquiao and Timothy Bradley set to be broadcast on big screens across the nation. As thousands of fans traipse into bars and restaurants to catch the big fight, a small army of corporate detectives will be lurking in the background, hoping to catch something else. Paid by the promoters of the closed-circuit televised event, these sleuths will be on the lookout for bar owners who show the Pacquiao-Bradley fight without paying the commercial rate, which dwarfs the fee to watch in your living room.
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BUSINESS
May 11, 1999 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sue Herera and Maria Bartiromo are two of the best-known faces in financial journalism, a world once dominated by white men in suits. Both women, in recent interviews, expressed their thoughts on the stock market, the booming demand for business news and their ever-busier lives. Sue Herera, 41, grew up in Brentwood. Her father was a shoe wholesaler and her mother a homemaker.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
For years, Republicans benefited from economic growth. So did pretty much everyone else, of course. But I have something specific in mind. Politically, when the economy is booming - or merely improving at a satisfactory clip - the distinction between being pro-business and pro-market is blurry. The distinction is also fuzzy when the economy is shrinking or imploding. But when the economy is simply limping along - not good, not disastrous - like it is now, the line is easier to see. And GOP politicians typically don't want to admit they see it. Just to clarify, the difference between being pro-business and pro-market is categorical.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Pots were boiling, pastries were baking and bodies were moving Wednesday as students at Aliso Niguel High School prepared a special luncheon to announce the start of an internship program to teach students the restaurant business. Students spend 15 hours a week working at local restaurants as part of their Culinary Arts Department curriculum. They also may receive community college credit.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2010
Makeover SEW JOE STITCH LOUNGE Business: Sew Joe Stitch Lounge is a South Pasadena shop that offers studio time and sewing classes as well as fabrics, notions and Brother sewing machines. Owner: Jeanie F. Joe Employees: One part-time contractor Revenue (2009): $60,000 Founded: December 2007 with $24,000 in start-up funds from a private investor Goals: To expand the business and hire a full-time employee Source: Sew Joe Stitch Lounge
BUSINESS
March 21, 2010
Re: "A charitable benefit," March 14: "Some Salvation Army officers get use of expensive homes." So what? For the men and women who devote their lives to providing care for those in need, any organization employing them would be remiss if it did not ensure adequate salaries and benefits. It sounds like smart money management and real estate investing to me when the Salvation Army buys homes in pricier neighborhoods to house its personnel. James Wight Altadena :: The fact that the Salvation Army is a residential powerhouse is in one sense irrelevant.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2010
Nokia, Intel join forces on software Nokia Corp. and Intel Corp. said they're combining the software they've each been developing for smart phones, tablet computers and other Internet-connected devices. The world's largest maker of phones and the world's largest maker of computer chips believe that together they have a better chance of competing in a crowded field of software systems that each hope to be as ubiquitous in mobile devices as Windows is on PCs. The new software, to be released in the second quarter, will be called MeeGo.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014
The company: Acacia Research Corp. Headquarters: Newport Beach Ticker: ACTG Employees: 68 Leadership: Matthew Vella, 42, chief executive since 2013 2013 revenue: $130.6 million 2013 net loss: $56.4 million Stock price: $17.19 at Friday's close 52-week range: $12.23 to $30.36 Quarterly dividend: 12.5 cents a share, a current yield of 2.9%
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Adam Jones
Animation giant Pixar uses technology only as a means to an end; its films are rooted in human concerns, not computer wizardry. The same can be said of the new book "Creativity, Inc.," Ed Catmull's endearingly thoughtful explanation of how the studio he co-founded generated hits such as the "Toy Story" trilogy, "Up" and "Wall-E. " Catmull was a 1970s computer animation pioneer (university classmates included Netscape co-founder Jim Clark), but his book is not a technical history of how the hand-drawn artistry perfected by Disney was rendered obsolete by the processing power of machines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Turning the Cecil Hotel into homeless housing was supposed to be a quick and innovative way to get skid row residents off the streets. But a proposal for hundreds of homeless units in the hotel collapsed recently in the face of opposition from downtown business leaders and social service providers, backed by Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina. They argued the neighborhood is oversaturated with homeless housing and other services. "Supervisor Molina's strong opinion is that the skid row area is the way it is because of an over-concentration of services," Roxane Marquez, Molina's press deputy, said Friday.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | David Lazarus
Among the frequently asked questions on Yelp's website, there's this: "Will Yelp remove or reorder bad reviews if a business pays for sponsorship?" And the answer: "No. You can't pay us to remove or reorder your bad reviews - it's just that simple. " It's not that simple, at least if you listen to the many small-business owners who say Yelp routinely uses bad reviews and competitors' ads as leverage to get merchants to cough up some cash. "They continually harass you and strong-arm you to get you to pay for their service," said Randy Boelsems, 64, who runs a boating supply company in Fountain Valley.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
If you're against letting airline passengers talk on cellphones, you've gained a powerful ally. The Global Business Travel Assn., a trade group for the world's business travelers, submitted its opposition last week to a plan by the Federal Communications Commission to lift a ban on voice calls on planes. The group, which represents about 6,000 travel managers, called onboard calls "detrimental to business travelers. " The association even quoted folk singer Pete Seeger, who borrowed heavily from the book of Ecclesiastes when he wrote "there is a time to keep silence and a time to speak.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - The Senate confirmed Maria Contreras-Sweet, a former California official who founded a Los Angeles community bank, to head the federal Small Business Administration. Contreras-Sweet was approved Thursday by voice vote to the Cabinet position, which helps small businesses with loans and other assistance. She takes over for Karen Mills, a former venture capitalist who stepped down as the agency's administrator last year. President Obama said Contreras-Sweet "understands what it means to start a small business" and has "a proven track record of helping other small businesses succeed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Republican gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari unveiled a jobs plan Tuesday that calls for corporate tax breaks, hydraulic fracturing of some California oil deposits, reduced regulations on business and increased spending on water storage. The 10-point plan, focused on manufacturing, water, energy and the business climate, is the first policy Kashkari has set forth since announcing in January that he would run for office. The former U.S. Treasury official said his plan would "unleash" the private sector, creating hundreds of thousands of jobs.
SPORTS
March 25, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
Steve Fisher, San Diego State's basketball coach, peered down from the high heaven of an NCAA news conference platform last Saturday and remarked, "This is a funny business we're in. " Fisher's words came after Xavier Thames had scored 53 points in 48 hours to lead the Aztecs out of an NCAA sub-regional in Spokane. It wasn't funny if you were trying to stop the senior known as "X," who was definitely a factor in giving a point-guard tutorial against New Mexico State and North Dakota State.
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