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BUSINESS
November 17, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Solidarity leader Lech Walesa stood before Congress this week and asked for assistance for the ailing economies of Eastern Europe, Carey Vigor-Zierk was sitting at her home computer and working on ways that she might lend a hand. Vigor-Zierk, a third-generation Polish-American, has formed a small company that is trying to obtain computer equipment for Poland's first alternative high school. But she has run into a lot of bureaucratic red tape.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Most people have probably encountered Avery Dennison Corp. products without even knowing it. The Pasadena company makes self-adhesive labels used on a wide variety of consumer goods: beer and wine bottles, shampoo and personal care items, pharmaceuticals and food. It also makes labels and tags attached to clothing. You know those annoying plastic fasteners that connect price tags to shirts, dresses and other clothing? Yep, they make those too. "We're everywhere you look, and you don't think about us a whole lot," said Dean A. Scarborough, the company's chief executive.
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OPINION
September 8, 1985
Did you know that Americans buy 750 tons of cauliflower, use 313 million gallons of fuel, spend $200,000 on roller skates and eat 200 million pounds of fresh fruit every day?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Mark Wahlberg doesn't keep an office. The 40-year old actor, who is one of Hollywood's most bankable stars and is becoming one of its most ambitious producers, prefers to hold court at the Polo Lounge in the Beverly Hills Hotel, a million miles away from his troubled beginnings in Dorchester, Mass. Whether it's breakfast with his wife and four kids or a meeting with an actor or a business partner, Wahlberg spends hours at the restaurant that once kicked out Marlene Dietrich for wearing pants.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Mark Wahlberg doesn't keep an office. The 40-year old actor, who is one of Hollywood's most bankable stars and is becoming one of its most ambitious producers, prefers to hold court at the Polo Lounge in the Beverly Hills Hotel, a million miles away from his troubled beginnings in Dorchester, Mass. Whether it's breakfast with his wife and four kids or a meeting with an actor or a business partner, Wahlberg spends hours at the restaurant that once kicked out Marlene Dietrich for wearing pants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1999
* Grand opening of Salvation Army Dental Clinic, 622 W. Wooley Road, Oxnard, on Sept. 13. Coffee bar at 7 a.m., breakfast at 8 and ribbon cutting at 9. Free, but reservations are required by Sept. 8 to (805) 483-9235.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
When put his second wife, Anne Boleyn, to death, he clearly was not considering the deleterious effect it would have on the Showtime series "The Tudors." Although such self-centered shortsightedness is the historic right of princes, it's a bit of a drag for the show's fans.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1991
In a year of big change, business has seen the departure of many familiar names as well as the rise of some new faces. For the record, here's how it went: Goodby Hello Michael Milken Alan Dershowitz John H. Gutfreund Warren E. Buffett Fred Carr John Garamendi Frank Mancuso Brandon Tartikoff Thomas W. Hayes Kathleen Brown L. William Seidman Albert Casey Robert Maxwell Kevin Maxwell Kevin Maxwell ?
BUSINESS
July 24, 1995 | DAN MARGOLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tony Adams Jr. was a shoe manufacturer with a problem. His family-owned business, Cypress Footwear Inc., was getting kicked around in the highly competitive footwear market. It expanded from sandals into walking shoes a few years ago and that helped a bit, but the family still found it tough to go head-to-head against foreign competitors. He needed a new line.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
When put his second wife, Anne Boleyn, to death, he clearly was not considering the deleterious effect it would have on the Showtime series "The Tudors." Although such self-centered shortsightedness is the historic right of princes, it's a bit of a drag for the show's fans.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
Since Dan Nye joined LinkedIn Corp. as chief executive less than a year ago, he has presided over dramatic growth even by Silicon Valley standards. Membership in the career contacts site has climbed to 17 million from 8 million, and the payroll to 200 from 60. Nye, a former executive at Procter & Gamble Co. and Intuit Inc., has made high-profile hires, including tapping Lloyd Taylor, formerly Google Inc.'s director of global operations, as LinkedIn's vice president of technical operations.
OPINION
September 12, 2006
PUBLIC CONFIDENCE IN THE POLICE is essential to public safety, and that confidence depends in large part on the ability to know when an officer's conduct has been called into serious question. That's why the state Supreme Court's decision late last month to shut off public access to police disciplinary proceedings -- even the names of officers being disciplined -- is so disappointing. This is a mistake that lawmakers should rectify as soon as possible.
WORLD
March 13, 2003 | Amberin Zaman, Special to The Times
"We are helping the infidels kill Muslims. We must drive those Americans out of here," said the pale, angry man, carefully adjusting his white skullcap. "That is what I tell my congregation every day." Ferhan Ozturk, 40, is the imam in this muddy village on the road to Iraq in southeastern Turkey. Over the past week in the nearby town of Kiziltepe, several hundred U.S. troops have been converting a flour mill and warehouse complex into a logistics base for a war against Iraq.
NEWS
August 7, 2001 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is volunteer night at the San Francisco Food Bank, and the dot-bombed have gathered to be reminded that somewhere, some people are even more miserable than they are. Wendy Wedlake, in capri pants, packs frozen snow peas into plastic baggies. She has been out of work for four months. Her compatriots eavesdrop sadly as she shares her story: "Laid off from an Internet market research company, third round, I was in sales, I knew it was coming. When they told me, at first I didn't even cry.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2001 | Stephen Gregory
A panel of energy experts will examine solutions to California's current electricity shortage Wednesday at a business-to-business energy "summit' sponsored by the Assn. of Professional Energy Managers and the Building Owners and Managers Assn. The panel will include representatives from Southern California Edison, Southern California Gas Co., Rand Corp. and the Independent Energy Producers group.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2000 | DAVID KOENIG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Two rivals in the business-to-business software industry said Monday that they will merge in what they billed as the sector's biggest combination ever, a $9.3-billion stock-for-stock deal. Dallas-based I2 Technologies Inc. said it will buy Aspect Development Inc., based in Mountain View, Calif., to boost its business of linking manufacturers and their suppliers on the Internet. The purchase price--a 35% premium over the companies' closing stock prices Friday--caught analysts by surprise.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Two sets of industry giants, helping to pull corporate America onto the Net, announced plans Wednesday to create business-to-business Web sites that promise to change the way companies shop. Engineering and construction giant Fluor Corp. in Irvine and IBM Corp. in Armonk, N.Y., agreed to build a global online market for fast-growing industries such as telecommunications, pharmaceuticals and oil and gas. In addition, Chevron Corp., Oracle Corp. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s McLane Co.
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