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BUSINESS
May 29, 1990 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Keizo Yoshida is the top officer of Sumitomo Bank of California, a big, profitable institution. Yet with an annual pay package worth $210,400, he earns only a fraction of what executives at similar banks take home. Yoshida isn't destitute, of course. But neither is he unique. Even as big money gets all the headlines, a surprising number of top executives are paid relatively modestly.
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BUSINESS
February 5, 1991 | DANIEL AKST
It was freezing in the Soviet Union late in January. Food was scarce in some places, and the forces of reaction seemed to be gaining. These factors apparently did not account for the presence here in sweet and balmy San Francisco of five members of the Leningrad City Soviet, whose week of meetings and seminars culminated in an extraordinary luncheon in the plush dining room of Baker & McKenzie, which bills itself as the world's biggest law firm.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It clearly pays to be a top officer of one of California's top corporations, but company insiders often get far more than just a salary, perks and lucrative severance arrangements. In many cases, they are involved in other business arrangements with their firms that can pay off in a big way. Hamburger mogul Carl Karcher, for example, drew a relatively modest $389,169 in cash compensation from Carl Karcher Enterprises last year.
NEWS
September 4, 1995 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Dellerba remembers a time not so long ago when bankers like him worked bankers' hours, took long lunches, golfed regularly and never came in on weekends. These days he works 12 hours a day, often through lunch, puts in more hours at home with a laptop computer and spends two full Saturdays a month at the office. "I've never worked harder in my life," says the 47-year-old president of Eldorado Bank in Irvine. Balbir Mann starts his workday at 2:15 a.m.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1997
The cost of doing business in California varies from city to city, with northern communities showing, on average, higher business taxes and other public fees than in the Southland. The survey by Los Angeles-based consultant Kosmont & Associates found Los Angeles to be the most expensive city in the state after considering all taxes and fees. However, because of low vacancy rates, rents in downtown San Francisco may be twice as high as rents in downtown Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1993 | ALEXEI BARRIONUEVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The air was thick with frustration at a meeting Wednesday of Southland chief executives, who offered their views on the business climate in California that some find so hostile that they're heading for the border. There was Yvonne Cucci, president of South Bay Screen Print, a sportswear manufacturer, complaining that time spent fighting workers' compensation claims is costing her sales. She's looking to relocate by the summer of 1994. There was Robert E.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1993
AlphaGraphics Printshops in California are offering a 15% discount to teachers and school administrators--and challenging the rest of California's businesses to do the same. "My daughter just got her master's degree in education at Stanford in June and I was thinking about schools, teachers and students," said Pat Toomey, owner of the AlphaGraphics shop in Irvine. "I thought about the budget cuts and thought here's a way I can help out.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Gonzalez has done just about every job there is as a Central Valley farm worker--from hoeing cotton to picking peaches, grapes and tomatoes. "I was raised in the fields," he says. But like many of his friends, Gonzalez decided to forsake the fields for the factory floor, and he now makes twice as much keeping electricity and water flowing smoothly at Nisshinbo, a state-of-the-art Japanese yarn-spinning and textile-weaving plant in Fresno.
NEWS
March 8, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An estimated 18,000 aerospace jobs--among the highest paying in industrial America--were lost in the Los Angeles region during the 1980s as local aerospace firms grew estranged and quietly relocated, according to a survey by the Los Angeles Times at plants across the nation.
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