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Business Closing

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH
The city of Santa Clarita on Thursday ordered an immediate shutdown of Hasa Chemical Co. in Saugus, contending that the firm poses a public safety hazard, city officials said. The company, which manufactures chlorine, does not comply with city chemical storage regulations, City Manager George Caravalho said, adding that both the city and the Los Angeles County Fire Department have ordered compliance for several years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1992
Several disaster application centers created to assist residents in filing for government aid will close this month. Saturday will be the last day of operation for centers at the Downey Recreation Center in Lincoln Heights and the Watts Senior Citizens Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1992 | ERIC BAILEY and FRANK MESSINA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ripples of confusion and disorder spilled into Orange County on Thursday as riots continued to grip Los Angeles one day after the acquittals of police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney G. King. College students held peaceful protests, grade school teachers comforted concerned pupils and commuters stayed home in droves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1991 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County's worm king saw a need and he filled it, expanding last spring to a 16-acre plot in the shadow of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. Cities had grass clippings and tree trimmings that they didn't want to haul to a landfill anymore. And Richard Morhar had millions of worms who would eat tons of the stuff every day.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United College of Business has closed its campuses here, in Hollywood and Pico Rivera because of financial problems that will force it into bankruptcy, officials said earlier this week. The business school, which had about 1,000 students at the three sites, was closed last Thursday after a state agency barred it from teaching students who receive federally guaranteed loans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1990 | BETSY BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During his 30 years of running a corner hardware store in Canoga Park, Vincent Di Cecco has sold a lot of nails and talked homeowners through many a weekend construction project gone awry. On Wednesday, however, it was time to pack up the sawbuck brackets and the socket wrenches, the lamp dimmers and the dusty packages of beeswax, and say "Goodby." "I'm very sad-hearted about it," Di Cecco said. "I've got all kinds of wonderful memories about this place."
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | MIKE WARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after a strong earthquake and hundreds of aftershocks, officials in Pomona, Claremont and La Verne were still adding up the damage Wednesday, inspecting cracks in buildings and waiting to hear from state and federal officials on the availability of aid. The 5.5-magnitude quake, centered three miles northwest of Upland in San Bernardino County, did much of its damage in eastern Los Angeles County. Losses in the three cities approach $10 million, according to the latest estimates.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | STEVEN R. CHURM and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Battling a stinging and bitter-cold sea spray, about 1,300 cleanup workers used rakes, rags and hand-booms to sop up the remnants of last week's 394,000-gallon oil spill that finally washed ashore Wednesday and blackened broad stretches along 15 miles of Orange County shoreline. A fierce overnight windstorm drove most of the remaining slick onto beaches from Newport Harbor to Bolsa Chica State Beach.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
They come at night, braving the treacherous strait in leaky 20-foot fishing boats called pateras . Paying up to $1,700 for the nine-mile illegal crossing to Europe's southernmost tip, many Moroccans ante up their life savings, gambling on a brighter future in a land rich beyond their dreams. Occasionally, winds and currents in the Strait of Gibraltar swamp the overloaded boats, tipping their human cargoes into the sea and almost-certain death. Occasionally, the Moroccans are caught by Spanish authorities and returned.
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