Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBusiness Europe
IN THE NEWS

Business Europe

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 17, 1992 | Associated Press
Federal Express Corp. said Monday that it will slash its domestic business in Europe and reduce its work force there by 6,600. The air freight company said it will set aside $254 million to pay for the overseas restructuring. Federal Express said the quarterly charge contributed to a loss of $193 million in its fiscal third quarter, which ended Feb. 29. The company has wrestled with a costly and difficult expansion abroad since 1985.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 6, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Europe's two leading central banks cut interest rates to record lows to boost their recession-mired economies. The cuts of half a percentage point by the European Central Bank and the Bank of England took rates down to 1.5% and 0.5%, respectively, as both banks try to stimulate growth amid lower consumer spending, rising unemployment and falling exports from the world economic crisis.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 4, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Europe this summer is no vacation spot for U.S. companies. American firms with major exports to Europe--or with operations based there--already were grappling with a three-year-old European recession. Now comes a currency crisis, making it even harder for U.S. executives to map plans for boosting European sales. What happens now? The European Community's decision last weekend to effectively abandon currency controls means interest rates could drop in several nations.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2004 | From Associated Press
Riding strong sales across its office-products portfolio, Staples Inc. on Tuesday reported a 39% jump in fiscal second-quarter net income that topped Wall Street's forecasts. The world's largest office-products retailer also announced its acquisition of two supply businesses in Europe -- expanding its presence to 15 countries -- and a joint-venture investment in China that marks Staples' first foray into the nation's $25-billion-a-year office-products market.
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 12 nations of the European Community, after 17 years of wrangling, are finally pursuing an antitrust policy that, with some important exceptions, walks and talks the American way. "They're moving closer to our antitrust goal of protecting consumers from the robber barons and the inefficiencies of monopolies," said Joseph P. Griffin, head of the local office of the American law firm Morgan, Lewis & Bockius. That is good news for Americans doing business in Europe.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To do business across Europe, bigness undeniably helps. But in many industries, size is no substitute for local market savvy and production facilities. And the advent of the single currency won't alter that or entice French consumers to act like Germans. "The question of location is still very important in Europe," said Roland Rick-Lenze, president and general director of Trilux, a family-owned German lighting manufacturer. "Americans are always a little bit naive on this question.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1999 | ANNETTE HADDAD and SCOTT DOGGETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since its founding in 1907, Nielsen-Massey Vanillas Inc. has followed a winning business recipe of importing some of the world's highest-quality vanilla beans and turning them into pure extracts for some of America's finest confectioners, bakers and ice cream makers. Then in 1987, the family-run, Waukegan, Ill.-based company decided it was time to export its flavorful products.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1988 there were only nine. In 1989 another six arrived. And this year 10 more U.S. law firms flocked to Brussels, hoping to cash in as the European Community directs a quiet revolution in the way businesses can do business in Europe. Propelling the rush is the long experience of American law firms in helping corporate clients cope with government regulation. The U.S.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 |
The United States and Britain have offered reassurances that their giant eavesdropping network is not involved in economic espionage, a European Union commissioner testified Thursday. European Enterprise Commissioner Erkki Liikanen testified during a special European Parliament debate that he received a letter from the U.S. State Department and Britain. Both governments denied accusations that the American-led Echelon spy network is used to snoop on Europeans and European businesses. "The U.S.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1998 | From Reuters
The European Commission said on Friday it had opened an in-depth probe into the proposed joint venture between AT&T Corp. and British Telecommunications. At the same time, it cleared a separate $48-billion merger between AT&T and U.S. cable giant Tele-Communications Inc., saying their union would have little impact on competition in Europe.
SCIENCE
June 2, 2003 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
On Christmas Day, Europe's first planetary explorer is expected to touch down on Mars, pop open like a clamshell and belt out a catchy little tune by the British pop band Blur. If the mission goes as planned, the British-made Beagle 2 lander will slowly extend its PAW -- a mechanical arm laden with instruments and sensors -- to begin probing the surface for signs of life as a dot painting by English avant-garde artist Damien Hirst helps calibrate the cameras.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're Microsoft, Sprint, UAL or any of a number of other U.S. companies, the most important--even feared--man in all Europe can be found here, at 70 Joseph II St. "Unfortunately, I'm not an interesting person," Mario Monti warned an interviewer with a self-deprecating chuckle. Yet this seemingly strait-laced northern Italian with a puckish wit is so powerful and influential that he has been nicknamed "Super Mario."
BUSINESS
September 15, 2000 | From Bloomberg News, Times Staff
The slumping euro currency's corporate victims are beginning to pile up. Colgate-Palmolive Co.'s shares (ticker symbol: CL) tumbled 16% on Thursday after analysts said the world's largest toothpaste maker was warning them that third-quarter sales will rise less than expected because of the falling euro. The stock's plunge--down $8.75 to $47.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2000 | HANS GREIMEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Europe is the world's hot spot for mergers and acquisitions, led by Britain, which unseated the United States for first place in buying out foreign companies last year, an economic policy group reports. Worldwide, the number of cross-border mergers jumped 50% to just more than 5,000 in 1999, with nearly three-quarters of the deals in Europe, according to the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2000 | From Reuters
Coca-Cola Co., embarrassed last year by a series of mishaps in Europe, again found itself under a cloud in the region Thursday as antitrust regulators raided the London and Brussels offices of the beverage giant's main bottler. The early-morning raids were part of a widening probe into whether Coca-Cola and its 40%-owned bottler, Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc., had breached European Union competition laws by offering retailers illegal incentives to buy Coke products at the expense of rival brands.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Bank of America Corp., the largest U.S. bank, said it's considering acquisitions and hiring investment bankers from rival firms to bolster its securities business in Europe. The Charlotte, N.C.-based bank has no plans to buy a "big investment bank" and would rather recruit bankers from other firms, said Kenneth Lewis, Bank of America's president and chief operating officer. The bank would consider buying a smaller firm to fill a particular niche, he said.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ticketmaster, Warner Form Joint Venture: Los Angeles-based Ticketmaster Corp. and Warner Music Group Inc., a unit of Time Warner Inc., have formed a joint venture to bring computerized ticketing to Europe. Ticketmaster Europe Group will use the same computerized system that Ticketmaster developed and operates in the United States. Its first venture will be in the United Kingdom.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 |
The United States and Britain have offered reassurances that their giant eavesdropping network is not involved in economic espionage, a European Union commissioner testified Thursday. European Enterprise Commissioner Erkki Liikanen testified during a special European Parliament debate that he received a letter from the U.S. State Department and Britain. Both governments denied accusations that the American-led Echelon spy network is used to snoop on Europeans and European businesses. "The U.S.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2000 | CNET News.com
Psion, Europe's leading hand-held computer maker, said it has teamed up with Motorola Inc. to develop wireless devices that will allow users to connect to the Internet. Motorola, a leading maker of cellular phones, and Psion are designing the devices to work with cellular networks in Europe, North America and Asia. They aim to have products ready in the first half of 2001. The companies said it was a nonexclusive agreement. No financial details were disclosed.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|