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Business Improvement District

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OPINION
June 23, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
At their best, business improvement districts in Los Angeles have been instrumental in revitalizing blighted and neglected communities. Property owners in a certain area vote to band together as a group and assess themselves a fee to service their area as they see fit. (The more property an owner has, the weightier his or her vote and the higher the assessment.) Most of the funds go to cleanup and security - picking up trash and erasing graffiti, for instance, are common enterprises of the districts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 17, 2014 | By Robert Krol and Shirley Svorny
The recent report from the Los Angeles 2020 Commission paints a bleak picture for Los Angeles, with a laundry list of ills facing the city. Our concern is that the commission will recommend options, to come within 90 days, that mimic those of the past: policies that favor specific industries, aim for growth in only particular geographic areas, lend money to firms turned down by banks or target specific types of jobs. We can't say this firmly enough: An important objective must be to make adjustments that give investors security about the future of city services and tax rates.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999 | KURT STREETER
The Los Angeles City Council unanimously voted Wednesday to create a business improvement district in Chatsworth. In an 11-0 vote, the council approved a motion aimed at bolstering the Devonshire commercial strip bordered by Jovita and Vassar avenues. The business improvement district is meant to make an area more attractive to customers by enhancing the ability of merchants to improve storefronts and marketing, beautify landscapes and improve security.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Carla Hall
One of the trickier problems in animal welfare is stopping the illegal sale of underage rabbits, kittens, turtles, birds and other exotic animals on street corners in Los Angeles. The area outside Santee Alley, the popular and densely filled open-air market for all kinds of wares downtown, has also been the venue of choice for vendors trafficking in these animals. The state of California bans the roadside sale of animals. And it's against the law to sell underage animals that are fragile and need special attention or bottle feeding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1991
THE QUESTION We queried the candidates in the Nov. 5 Ventura City Council election about three key issues facing the city. Today's responses are to question No. 2 and address the subject of development. In the past year, the council has increased user fees for everything from alarm responses to zoning changes to make up for declining state and federal aid. In light of that and the recession, what would you do as a council member to raise money for projects such as revitalizing downtown?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2011 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
After years of watching Westwood Village deteriorate into a zone of overgrown trees and empty storefronts, retailers here said they saw a glimmer of hope recently as cleaning crews began power-scrubbing the district's grimy sidewalks. A new business improvement district - Westwood's first in nearly a decade - has begun having trash picked up, freshly trimmed branches decked with lights and thousands of inky chewing-gum splotches scrubbed off the walkways. The district has also employed a cadre of polo-shirted "public safety ambassadors" - some of whom patrol the village on Segways - to provide directions to visitors and roust the neighborhood's entrenched ranks of homeless people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1996
Los Angeles City Councilman Mike Feuer has met with about 50 property owners and merchants from along Fairfax and Melrose avenues to discuss the possibility of creating a business improvement district to revitalize the area. In a business improvement district, property owners or merchants collectively contribute to a fund that pays for such things as street cleaning, landscaping, marketing campaigns and holiday decorations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1998
I started working in downtown Los Angeles in 1946 and although I am now retired, I visit the area occasionally. I want to compliment the downtown business community and the Central City Assn. in forming the new Business Improvement District. In 50 years, I have not seen the streets and sidewalks as clean as they are today. FRANK G. HATHAWAY Chairman of the Board Los Angeles Athletic Club
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | Frank Shyong
In its heyday, Empress Pavilion fielded an army of 100 employees that brought the restaurant to life at dawn; a crew of 20 prep cooks chopped vegetables, wrapped dumplings and crimped shumai. When doors opened at 9 a.m., a squadron of waitresses armed with steam carts fanned out across a vast 600-seat dining room, hawking tins of black bean spare rib and har gow in three languages. The wait to get in could last two hours. Empress Pavilion -- behind on rent and struggling to find customers -- closed earlier this summer, the latest blow in Chinatown's three decades of slow decline.
OPINION
June 23, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
At their best, business improvement districts in Los Angeles have been instrumental in revitalizing blighted and neglected communities. Property owners in a certain area vote to band together as a group and assess themselves a fee to service their area as they see fit. (The more property an owner has, the weightier his or her vote and the higher the assessment.) Most of the funds go to cleanup and security - picking up trash and erasing graffiti, for instance, are common enterprises of the districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
When the bike patrols suddenly ended in downtown Los Angeles' arts district last month, junk began to pile up against the curb on Seaton Street. Over on Mateo Street, a trail of aqua-blue chips from shattered car windows glittered along the gutter. "It's like they got the memo the guys were gone," said actress Dawn Cody, who lives in the arts district. The private patrols were run by the neighborhood's business improvement district - one of 10 downtown and 39 throughout Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
At the start of each morning, a private army of workers descends on downtown Los Angeles in bright-colored shirts, providing security, collecting trash, scrubbing graffiti, power-washing sidewalks and otherwise keeping downtown presentable. The crews work for downtown's network of business improvement districts and have become familiar parts of the area's fabric. Many in downtown credit the business improvement districts, or BIDs, with helping turn around the once-desolate downtown, providing the kind of aggressive maintenance and security services that City Hall simply cannot afford and helping to market the area to new investors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2011 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
After years of watching Westwood Village deteriorate into a zone of overgrown trees and empty storefronts, retailers here said they saw a glimmer of hope recently as cleaning crews began power-scrubbing the district's grimy sidewalks. A new business improvement district - Westwood's first in nearly a decade - has begun having trash picked up, freshly trimmed branches decked with lights and thousands of inky chewing-gum splotches scrubbed off the walkways. The district has also employed a cadre of polo-shirted "public safety ambassadors" - some of whom patrol the village on Segways - to provide directions to visitors and roust the neighborhood's entrenched ranks of homeless people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2011 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
A month ago, attorney Roberto Saldaña looked like a shoo-in to run the Historic Downtown Los Angeles Business Improvement District, a little-known group of property owners that pays extra taxes for such services as having sidewalks cleaned and litter picked up. The group's board of directors voted unanimously to make Saldaña, 34, its executive director. Its chairman, Boris Mayzels, described Saldaña as "by far the most qualified" for the job. Not long after they made their decision, however, Councilman Jose Huizar got involved, board members and business leaders said.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2009 | Michael Hiltzik
This being the yuletide season, I made my way to the downtown Los Angeles Toy District the other day, because nothing says "Christmas" to me so much as stepping over piles of garbage to cross the street and shouldering my way past overflowing dumpsters in busy alleys. The Toy District is in a bad way. Established by immigrant entrepreneurs in the 1980s as the center of a thriving wholesale import-export trade in toys and other gewgaws mostly from Hong Kong and China, it has been losing its verve for several years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2009 | My-Thuan Tran
Sithea San rejoiced when Long Beach officials designated a strip of Anaheim Street the nation's first Cambodia Town in 2007. The name would celebrate the largest Cambodian population center in the country and help revitalize the gritty neighborhood, she believed. San envisioned one day looking down Anaheim Street and seeing facades resembling ornate Cambodian temples; a large-scale shopping center where tourists could sample Cambodian cuisine and buy handcrafts; and even a museum outlining the history of Cambodian Americans in Long Beach.
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