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Business Improvement Districts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1999
The San Fernando Valley Economic Alliance is presenting a daylong conference on business improvement districts June 26. Business improvement districts provide a means for merchants to provide for improved security, landscaping, marketing and storefront refurbishments. They are generally funded by either a property tax surcharge or assessments on local businesses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 17, 2014 | By Robert Krol and Shirley Svorny
The recent report from the Los Angeles 2020 Commission paints a bleak picture for Los Angeles, with a laundry list of ills facing the city. Our concern is that the commission will recommend options, to come within 90 days, that mimic those of the past: policies that favor specific industries, aim for growth in only particular geographic areas, lend money to firms turned down by banks or target specific types of jobs. We can't say this firmly enough: An important objective must be to make adjustments that give investors security about the future of city services and tax rates.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2009 | Cara Mia DiMassa and Richard Winton
In the 1980s and '90s, rising crime, dilapidated streets and a perception that police alone could not keep the streets of Los Angeles safe led a few neighborhoods to take matters into their own hands. In areas as varied as Old Pasadena, Westwood, Hollywood Boulevard and downtown L.A., business and property owners banded together to assess themselves and form umbrella organizations aimed at keeping their areas safe and clean.
OPINION
June 23, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
At their best, business improvement districts in Los Angeles have been instrumental in revitalizing blighted and neglected communities. Property owners in a certain area vote to band together as a group and assess themselves a fee to service their area as they see fit. (The more property an owner has, the weightier his or her vote and the higher the assessment.) Most of the funds go to cleanup and security - picking up trash and erasing graffiti, for instance, are common enterprises of the districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999 | SUE FOX
Hoping to perk up a sagging neighborhood noted half a century ago for its thriving mom-and-pop stores, the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday approved a new business improvement district for Reseda. Councilwoman Laura Chick, who represents the area, has spearheaded the effort to boost safety and spruce up the appearance of the commercial corridor, which includes parts of Reseda Boulevard and Sherman Way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN
In an effort to spruce up Ventura Boulevard, Los Angeles City Councilman Marvin Braude has proposed business improvement districts for Encino, Tarzana and Woodland Hills. Such districts generate money by assessing businesses and using the funds to pay for new landscaping, bus benches, trash cans, street lighting and sidewalk cleaning, among other improvements. Braude has already introduced motions to spend $200,000 to set up the improvement districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1991
THE QUESTION We queried the candidates in the Nov. 5 Ventura City Council election about three key issues facing the city. Today's responses are to question No. 2 and address the subject of development. In the past year, the council has increased user fees for everything from alarm responses to zoning changes to make up for declining state and federal aid. In light of that and the recession, what would you do as a council member to raise money for projects such as revitalizing downtown?
BUSINESS
November 17, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claiming they've been harassed and assaulted by private security guards patrolling public streets in downtown Los Angeles, 12 homeless residents on Tuesday filed suit against three security companies and the local property owners that employ them. The class-action lawsuit, the first of its kind in the nation, challenges a fast-growing economic development movement that has put brightly uniformed private security forces on the streets of Los Angeles and other major U.S. cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1999 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
In a bid to spur economic development and improve retail districts, the Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley will co-sponsor the first Valleywide conference on business improvement districts today. Representatives from the Valley's 10 business improvement districts, as well as members of the Los Angeles City Council and business district experts will discuss the benefits, creation and management of successful business improvement districts (BIDs).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday unanimously approved three motions setting aside a total of $225,000 to explore the possibility of establishing Business Improvement Districts in Chatsworth, Northridge and Granada Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
When the bike patrols suddenly ended in downtown Los Angeles' arts district last month, junk began to pile up against the curb on Seaton Street. Over on Mateo Street, a trail of aqua-blue chips from shattered car windows glittered along the gutter. "It's like they got the memo the guys were gone," said actress Dawn Cody, who lives in the arts district. The private patrols were run by the neighborhood's business improvement district - one of 10 downtown and 39 throughout Los Angeles.
OPINION
February 24, 2013
The 9th Council District in South Los Angeles suffers from a toxic combination of entrenched poverty, blight, high unemployment and lagging job skills. With its current representative, Councilwoman Jan Perry, termed out and running for mayor, it is seeking a replacement who can improve the district's lot on a shoestring budget. Of the seven candidates in the field, the one who stands out as having the most thoughtful and achievable program to meet those challenges is David Roberts. The key-shaped 9th runs directly south from Washington Boulevard to East 95th Street, with an offshoot extending north to Staples Center and L.A. Live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
At the start of each morning, a private army of workers descends on downtown Los Angeles in bright-colored shirts, providing security, collecting trash, scrubbing graffiti, power-washing sidewalks and otherwise keeping downtown presentable. The crews work for downtown's network of business improvement districts and have become familiar parts of the area's fabric. Many in downtown credit the business improvement districts, or BIDs, with helping turn around the once-desolate downtown, providing the kind of aggressive maintenance and security services that City Hall simply cannot afford and helping to market the area to new investors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2011 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
After years of watching Westwood Village deteriorate into a zone of overgrown trees and empty storefronts, retailers here said they saw a glimmer of hope recently as cleaning crews began power-scrubbing the district's grimy sidewalks. A new business improvement district - Westwood's first in nearly a decade - has begun having trash picked up, freshly trimmed branches decked with lights and thousands of inky chewing-gum splotches scrubbed off the walkways. The district has also employed a cadre of polo-shirted "public safety ambassadors" - some of whom patrol the village on Segways - to provide directions to visitors and roust the neighborhood's entrenched ranks of homeless people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2011 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
A month ago, attorney Roberto Saldaña looked like a shoo-in to run the Historic Downtown Los Angeles Business Improvement District, a little-known group of property owners that pays extra taxes for such services as having sidewalks cleaned and litter picked up. The group's board of directors voted unanimously to make Saldaña, 34, its executive director. Its chairman, Boris Mayzels, described Saldaña as "by far the most qualified" for the job. Not long after they made their decision, however, Councilman Jose Huizar got involved, board members and business leaders said.
OPINION
September 24, 2004
Los Angeles business owners will lose one of their really great champions when City Clerk Mike Carey retires at the end of September. I worked closely for many hours with Carey to set up three of the city's then brand-new Business Improvement Districts in the Northwest Valley back in 1998, and was continuously impressed with his absolute understanding of the daily problems faced by retail merchants all over the city. His office has now helped 30 BIDs get started; there are 15 more in the pipeline.
OPINION
September 24, 2004
With the L.A. County medical trauma system in crisis, placing an article about James Fuhrman ("Ethics Watchdog Drops Chase in W. Hollywood," Sept. 21) on the front page and the story about King/Drew Medical Center back in the California section defies belief. Fuhrman's impact on this community has been minuscule by any standard, at best resulting in a reduction in meal expenses charged to the city by officials. This story belongs on the comics page; Fuhrman is a joke, not real news.
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