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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1993 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A woman dropped by the newly reopened Bicycle Sam shop in Monrovia on Thursday to pick up some parts, but she was $1 short. That's OK, the bike shop's new co-owner told her. Bring it next time. A couple of hours later, the woman came back with the $1. Dayton Kang tried to wave her away, but she insisted. It was business as usual at the bicycle shop, which reopened Wednesday, six weeks after its popular owner was shot and killed. A 12-year-old boy has been charged with using a .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: What do the city of Burbank and Rodney Dangerfield have in common? Answer: They don't get no respect, no respect at all. Of course, the preceding joke is based on image, not truth. With his sold-out concerts and film ventures, Dangerfield has tons of respect. And recent events in Burbank reveal that the community that has been the frequent target of Johnny Carson's wit may be getting the last laugh.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing competition among cities in the Los Angeles area has all but halted a once-widespread practice of jacking up business and development taxes to help pay for municipal services, a comprehensive survey has found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From where Steve Lorens sat, a needle etching the image of a Rottweiler into his upper back, the idea of Los Angeles County government regulating the tattoo business areas sounded absurd. "Are they going to walk around and give each tattoo an A, B, C or D?" Lorens asked as he sat in a Covina tattoo parlor, referring to the county's rating system for restaurants. "They call this America. You should be able to do what you want."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, economist Ron Halcrow had some bad news for Palmdale and Lancaster, the dusty desert towns that had become two of California's fastest growing cities almost overnight. At the northern edge of Los Angeles County, where dozens of spanking-new housing tracts had sprouted in the old alfalfa fields during the mid- to late 1980s, he saw dark clouds on the horizon.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
There's no name on the door of the Pasadena building that's headquarters for one of the smartest, fastest-growing, most successful companies in Southern California. The anonymity is due to the work the company does. Inter-Con Security Systems supplies guards and sophisticated monitoring and alarm systems to U.S. and foreign embassies in Latin America, Europe and Africa, and to institutions such as Kaiser hospitals, Qualcomm Stadium and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fun was supposed to start at 5 p.m., but here it was 6:15 already and Dave Gayman was sweating it out. Heat shimmered off the brick and asphalt of Myrtle Avenue, and the old girl was looking a little faint. Poor old Myrtle. After all she's been through, it looked like her Friday night party was going to be a flop. Then, as the sun melted toward the horizon, the people of Monrovia started to stroll into a downtown that resembled a country fair.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1993 | MATTHEW HELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The three men entered the clothing store almost simultaneously, two through the front and the other through the rear. Dressed in gang attire--khaki pants, oversized white T-shirts and black sneakers--they weren't the store's typical customers. "It was obvious what was going to happen," said David Rosenberg, co-founder of the Centurion Group, a Glendale security firm. "They were either going for the cash register or they were going to grab some merchandise and head out the door."
BUSINESS
June 29, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stock traders dove under tables, aerospace workers fled their offices and hotel maids were sent home in the wake of the largest earthquake to hit Los Angeles in the past 20 years. The quake, which measured a magnitude of 6.0, forced the evacuation of businesses from Pasadena to Huntington Beach and caused banks and shopping malls to close for the day. Merchants who peddle earthquake kits reported increased sales.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1990 | BEN SULLIVAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Known for most of its 33 years as the "gravel capital of Southern California," Irwindale is switching from an industrial economy to one based on commercial land development. Or, at least, city leaders hope so. Already, such players as Home Savings of America and Miller Brewery have major operations in the San Gabriel Valley city. Now Irwindale, population 1,100, wants to woo more businesses and profit from the property taxes.
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