Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBusiness Los Angeles
IN THE NEWS

Business Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2000 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing hordes of protesters gathering in nearby Pershing Square, and having little faith in the LAPD to protect them, most merchants in Los Angeles' sprawling jewelry district plan to shut down for convention week at a cost of millions of dollars a day in lost sales. "We're not taking any chances," said Sam Chamsi of the Diamond Center at 631 S. Hill St. in the heart of the nation's second-largest jewelry and diamond district.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 7, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN
Why should politicos get all the limelight when hundreds of reporters descend on Los Angeles for the Democratic convention next week? Civic boosters will try to divert some of their attention to L.A.'s technology firms with bus tours and harbor cruises featuring some of the city's high-tech hotshots. One of the bus tours will stop at EC2, USC's high-tech incubator; online retailer EStyle, which runs the Babystyle.com and Kidstyle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2000 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As workers toiled under a hot sun to install a security fence around the immediate Staples Center area, some merchants near the arena were broiling mad Thursday at the prospects of losing more business because of the barriers. Merchants south of the arena on Figueroa Street have already seen their business plummet by as much as 40% since rioters rampaged through the area when the Lakers won the National Basketball Assn. title June 19.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | JIM NEWTON and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Conflicted over how to react to projected traffic tie-ups and protests during this month's Democratic National Convention, some downtown businesses are closing their doors while others, including some of the area's biggest property owners, are urging their tenants to show up for work and welcome delegates to town. Among those preparing to shut down their downtown offices and send employees elsewhere are the Gas Co. and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Van Nuys Boulevard is getting spruced up. Or at least cleaned up, in an effort that Los Angeles officials hope will enhance the area's businesses and attract more customers. Until November, Department of Public Works crews will battle traffic from Victory Boulevard to Calvert Street along Van Nuys Boulevard to replace about 43 old, unhealthy and unattractive trees with new ones, said Sandy Kievman, field deputy for L.A. City Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski, who represents the area.
NEWS
July 9, 2000 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
You could be a barber in Bel-Air. Or a seamstress in Sherman Oaks. Or perhaps a veterinarian in Venice. If you haven't paid your city business taxes, the city of Los Angeles wants your name. And it wants the state of California to turn you in. According to the state Franchise Tax Board, there are at least 260,000 Los Angeles businesses paying state taxes. City of Los Angeles records show only 200,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Hollywood seemingly on the verge of changing from dumpy to desirable, property owners are being urged to be more choosy about future commercial tenants. Enough with the junky souvenir shops and tourist-trap T-shirt stores. Instead, fill your empty storefronts with businesses that will attract local shoppers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
When Brentwood resident Deena Sotto agreed to accompany her friend to the Sun Valley showroom of Walker Zanger, a high-end distributor of marble, granite and other natural-stone products, she was certain that her friend was confused about the address. "I would have thought that this type of showroom would have been with the more expensive real estate, like on Melrose," said Sotto during a recent shopping trip. "But this is really nice, out here in the middle of nowhere."
NEWS
June 18, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Merchants and residents of North Hollywood are hoping the rainbow-like entrance to the new Red Line subway station will be symbolic, leading their community to an economic pot of gold. After decades of having their hopes dashed by ineffective city efforts to stem the tide of blight that has swept over North Hollywood, many area civic leaders believe the subway will be the thing to finally rescue their community from its economic malaise.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2000 | INDRANEEL SUR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One firm makes in-line skates in Los Angeles. Another produces home water filters in El Cajon. And a third at one time staged ice-skating productions of Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker." These small-cap Southern California companies suddenly had something in common this week, when federal prosecutors alleged that the stocks of all three were among those purchased in blocks and then aggressively sold by unlicensed brokers and people linked to organized crime over the last five years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|