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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | JIM NEWTON and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Conflicted over how to react to projected traffic tie-ups and protests during this month's Democratic National Convention, some downtown businesses are closing their doors while others, including some of the area's biggest property owners, are urging their tenants to show up for work and welcome delegates to town. Among those preparing to shut down their downtown offices and send employees elsewhere are the Gas Co. and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Van Nuys Boulevard is getting spruced up. Or at least cleaned up, in an effort that Los Angeles officials hope will enhance the area's businesses and attract more customers. Until November, Department of Public Works crews will battle traffic from Victory Boulevard to Calvert Street along Van Nuys Boulevard to replace about 43 old, unhealthy and unattractive trees with new ones, said Sandy Kievman, field deputy for L.A. City Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski, who represents the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Hollywood seemingly on the verge of changing from dumpy to desirable, property owners are being urged to be more choosy about future commercial tenants. Enough with the junky souvenir shops and tourist-trap T-shirt stores. Instead, fill your empty storefronts with businesses that will attract local shoppers.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2000 | INDRANEEL SUR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One firm makes in-line skates in Los Angeles. Another produces home water filters in El Cajon. And a third at one time staged ice-skating productions of Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker." These small-cap Southern California companies suddenly had something in common this week, when federal prosecutors alleged that the stocks of all three were among those purchased in blocks and then aggressively sold by unlicensed brokers and people linked to organized crime over the last five years.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Community Development Bank, the centerpiece of city efforts to revitalize depressed communities, could be forced to close if a radical restructuring now underway fails, according to a government report and city officials. The federal government's largest response to the 1992 riots, the bank has suffered a series of setbacks to its goal of channeling loans to businesses rejected by conventional lenders in the city's most blighted pockets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wander a few blocks southeast of Los Angeles City Hall and you'll catch a briny whiff from the seafood processing plants. But it's a pungent, distinctly human odor that troubles the business owners of Central City East. Jammed into a few square miles alongside the city's highest concentration of homeless people, the industrial district surrounding skid row long has doubled as a toilet for the down and out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a concerted effort to rejuvenate Chinatown, which for years has suffered from poor retail sales, stagnant property values and image problems, a group of business and property owners Thursday launched a campaign to revitalize the historic district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL and ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tina Jimenez, 14, felt like an important city employee Thursday as she handed out job announcements and answered questions on job openings at City Hall. "We offer good pay," she told those who stopped by. The San Fernando teen was among 16 girls from 8 to 15 years old who visited the hub of municipal government for Take Our Daughters to Work Day, an annual event created by the Ms. Foundation to help preteen and teenage girls focus for one day on their ambitions rather than on how they look.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first promises were made so many years ago that Estilita Grimaldo rolls her eyes at the memory. Now, long after many residents and business owners had given up hope, efforts to revitalize Highland Park's scuffed and sorry commercial strip on North Figueroa Street are taking root. The sign above the historic Highland Park theater illuminates the barren street at night. A community newspaper is heading for its third printing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA and ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Outside the door of his toy store on the edge of downtown Los Angeles' skid row, Charles Woo says he has watched as aggressive panhandlers startled potential customers, frightened his employees and made a general nuisance of themselves. Anything the city can do to keep in-your-face beggars out of his face would be good news, he said.
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