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WORLD
October 20, 2002 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
In the end, world chess champion Vladimir Kramnik was apparently undone by an attribute that separates humans from machines: an appreciation of beauty. After eight matches, a contest here between the Russian-born champ and a German-made computer program, Deep Fritz, was declared a draw Saturday night.
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BUSINESS
October 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
AST to Launch Machines: AST Research Inc., which said Friday that it would lay off nearly 700 workers and move its California manufacturing operations to Taiwan because of heavy losses, plans to introduce two products today that it hopes will help sales. The Irvine-based computer maker said it is rolling out two computers that will allow networks of business machines to operate complex software.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1995 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city was still reeling from the devastating earthquake five days before. But on Sunday, hydraulic shovels were busily clearing rubble at Sumitomo Rubber's Dunlop tire and golf ball factory. Across the street, at the company's headquarters, 500 employees--including some who had lost their homes to the quake--showed up for work after traveling hours on packed trains, walking or bicycling through the scorched and upturned city.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1995 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city was still reeling from the devastating earthquake five days before. But on Sunday, hydraulic shovels were busily clearing rubble at Sumitomo Rubber's Dunlop tire and golf ball factory. Across the street, at the company's headquarters, 500 employees--including some who had lost their homes to the quake--showed up for work after traveling hours on packed trains, walking or bicycling through the scorched and upturned city.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1990 | S.J. DIAMOND
There seems to be some concern that as cash registers get smarter, the people behind them get less so. Consumers complain that clerks can't add up even two or three purchases without a register. A newspaper columnist writes of his encounter with a salesclerk who couldn't "do 10%" of $28.86 in her head. And a Los Angeles lawyer named George Schulman had to fight a McDonald's clerk and her manager over the proper charge for two "Happy Meals" with milkshakes substituted for the provided drinks.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | LYNN SIMROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vincent Valenza recalls the most unusual fax that he has transmitted for a customer--a 37-page musical composition for a television commercial: "The producer sent it from here (Burbank) to New York. Changes were made there and sent back. More changes here, then back to New York. Back and forth again a third time. It took about five hours." Valenza, owner of Mail Boxes and Accessories, makes a business of sending faxes, and other kinds of correspondence.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Canon Business Machines, a Costa Mesa-based U.S. subsidiary of the Japanese electronics giant, said this week that it plans to significantly expand the Tijuana manufacturing plant it opened last summer. Since June, Canon has been manufacturing printed circuit boards and ribbon cassettes for electronic typewriters at a 60,000-square-foot facility in a business park in the Fundadores district in southern Tijuana.
NEWS
April 12, 1992
A Reynolds Aluminum Can Recycling Machine has been installed at Covina Square, 422 N. Azusa Ave., Covina. Unlike recycling centers that must be staffed, the machine automatically accepts whole or smashed cans and pays consumers cash on the spot. It operates 24 hours a day. The machine pays 70 cents a pound, with 26 empty cans to the pound. Other Reynolds machines in the San Gabriel Valley are at Alpha Beta, 3130 S. Colima Ave., Hacienda Heights, and Commerce Center, 20817 Valley Blvd., Walnut.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | From Reuters
Apple Computer Inc., inventor of the personal computer in the mid-1970s, now appears to be reinventing itself as it struggles to extend its successful machines into an extremely competitive market. In the past few weeks it has lopped staff, mulled an executive pay cut and slashed PC prices. Now it is taking the unprecedented step of discussing a link with its longstanding nemesis, International Business Machines Corp.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
AST to Launch Machines: AST Research Inc., which said Friday that it would lay off nearly 700 workers and move its California manufacturing operations to Taiwan because of heavy losses, plans to introduce two products today that it hopes will help sales. The Irvine-based computer maker said it is rolling out two computers that will allow networks of business machines to operate complex software.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994 | From Associated Press
Lee Dayton was anxious. It was early 1993, and IBM was bleeding red ink. Dayton, IBM's manager of real estate, ordered his staff to slash expenses for office space. They quickly responded, moving four employees into one wastefully big office. His. "I told my team that we'd better make an example of ourselves," the manager recalled, grinning. "They came up with a plan which required me to evict myself." Dayton's transfer to a smaller office in Stamford, Conn.
NEWS
April 12, 1992
A Reynolds Aluminum Can Recycling Machine has been installed at Covina Square, 422 N. Azusa Ave., Covina. Unlike recycling centers that must be staffed, the machine automatically accepts whole or smashed cans and pays consumers cash on the spot. It operates 24 hours a day. The machine pays 70 cents a pound, with 26 empty cans to the pound. Other Reynolds machines in the San Gabriel Valley are at Alpha Beta, 3130 S. Colima Ave., Hacienda Heights, and Commerce Center, 20817 Valley Blvd., Walnut.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | LYNN SIMROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vincent Valenza recalls the most unusual fax that he has transmitted for a customer--a 37-page musical composition for a television commercial: "The producer sent it from here (Burbank) to New York. Changes were made there and sent back. More changes here, then back to New York. Back and forth again a third time. It took about five hours." Valenza, owner of Mail Boxes and Accessories, makes a business of sending faxes, and other kinds of correspondence.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | From Reuters
Apple Computer Inc., inventor of the personal computer in the mid-1970s, now appears to be reinventing itself as it struggles to extend its successful machines into an extremely competitive market. In the past few weeks it has lopped staff, mulled an executive pay cut and slashed PC prices. Now it is taking the unprecedented step of discussing a link with its longstanding nemesis, International Business Machines Corp.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1990 | S.J. DIAMOND
There seems to be some concern that as cash registers get smarter, the people behind them get less so. Consumers complain that clerks can't add up even two or three purchases without a register. A newspaper columnist writes of his encounter with a salesclerk who couldn't "do 10%" of $28.86 in her head. And a Los Angeles lawyer named George Schulman had to fight a McDonald's clerk and her manager over the proper charge for two "Happy Meals" with milkshakes substituted for the provided drinks.
NEWS
January 25, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
Why are all those Beverly Hills home fax machines purring away late at night? Stockbrokers passing hot tips on to blue-chip customers? Movie execs swapping script outlines into the night? Foodies sending finicky take-out orders to their favorite delis? Would you believe homework?
BUSINESS
December 15, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Canon Business Machines, a Costa Mesa-based U.S. subsidiary of the Japanese electronics giant, said this week that it plans to significantly expand the Tijuana manufacturing plant it opened last summer. Since June, Canon has been manufacturing printed circuit boards and ribbon cassettes for electronic typewriters at a 60,000-square-foot facility in a business park in the Fundadores district in southern Tijuana.
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