Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBusiness Orange County
IN THE NEWS

Business Orange County

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 17, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For many Orange County executives, 1991 was a year when their pay packages came under greater shareholder scrutiny and corporate boards were cautious in handing out cash bonuses and perks. It mirrored a trend statewide of keeping executive compensation in line with a company's financial performance. Of the top 100 county executives on the list of publicly traded companies, one-third of the officers saw their cash compensation remain unchanged or had it reduced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2001 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To San Juan Capistrano officials, repair delays that have kept a stretch of Camino Capistrano closed for nearly four years are a major headache. For residents, the road closure caused by El Nino rains in 1998 is a minor inconvenience. But to Ron Shearer and Dave Velton, whose used car lot sits a few hundred yards north of the crumbled roadway, the wait has been an "absolute nightmare."
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 5, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Coast Repertory recently held a special evening for Orange County's gay community. The Costa Mesa theater offered "Hay Fever," by gay playwright Noel Coward, followed by a Champagne reception with director William Ludel. The event was advertised in a publication that circulates in the gay community, and it drew a larger-than-usual crowd at the 500-seat theater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2001 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You have to look hard, but there are signs of life at the closed El Toro Marine base. Amid all the dilapidated buildings, gopher-infested lawns and deserted streets there's the buzz of model airplanes, the screeching of car tires, the ping of a club smacking a golf ball and the clomping of horse hooves. Since the base officially closed June 2, 1999, much of it has become a ghost town. Once the sun goes down, coyotes, gophers and squirrels take over the quiet, pitch-black streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1994 | MARY LOU PICKEL
Peering over a fence next to a busy Fullerton street, an eight-foot ostrich waved his shiny black wings, and stuck out his tongue. "He's trying to show me how big he is," said 32-year-old Dennis Campbell, owner of Orange County's only ostrich farm. Once a common sight in Southern California when ostrich feathers were in high demand for lady's hats last century, the birds are now a novelty. But entrepreneurs like Campbell and his partner Alex Wilson are hoping to change all that.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1999 | Marc Ballon
Twenty-two Orange County firms have made accounting and consulting firm Deloitte & Touche LLP's list of the 50 fastest-growing technology companies in a two-county region. Four Orange County firms placed in the Top 10. Broadcom Corp., an Irvine-based maker of semiconductors for high-speed communications, ranked second with revenue growth of nearly 5,480% over the past five years. SRS Labs Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is this the last laugh for the Laff Stop, Orange County's oldest comedy club? The marquee still boasts "All Comedy Nite Club," but comedy was consigned to Friday and Saturday nights as of Feb. 1. Topless dancing has taken over the stage the rest of the week. Owner and operator Jorn S. Rossi said in an interview Monday that he is committed to keeping the Laff Stop name.
NEWS
February 7, 1996 | DEXTER FILKINS and THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On Main Street, everyone has a story about the skinheads. Shawna Sakal, whose family owns a surf shop, remembers the black store clerk harassed by young toughs. Curtis Maddox recalls the four meaty arms jerking out of a passing car in Hitler-style salutes. Lance Lee, a sales clerk at Beachcomber's Surf Shop, tells of the man who came in the other day looking to sell his surfboard. "It had swastikas all over it," Lee said. "We bought it, but we had to paint them over."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1999 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting shirtless at Sid's Tattoo Parlor in Santa Ana, pastor James Rasmussen didn't flinch as Rob Silva worked the long, silver needle into his pale skin. Rasmussen decided the faded blue tattoo of a biker on his right shoulder wasn't in tandem with his born-again lifestyle and wanted it covered with his church's symbol: a dove and a cross. "I want to be a walking billboard for Jesus Christ," said Rasmussen, clicking his tongue stud between his two front teeth.
NEWS
February 7, 1996 | DEXTER FILKINS and THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On Main Street, everyone has a story about the skinheads. Shawna Sakal, whose family owns a surf shop, remembers the black store clerk harassed by young toughs. Curtis Maddox recalls the four meaty arms jerking out of a passing car in Hitler-style salutes. Lance Lee, a salesclerk at Beachcomber's Surf Shop, tells of the man who came in the other day to sell his surfboard. "It had swastikas all over it," Lee said. "We bought it, but we had to paint them over."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2001 | CAROL CHAMBERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing an uncertain future for the airline industry and the unknown impact federal security requirements would have on airport development, Burbank Airport officials voted Thursday to put plans to build a 14-gate terminal on hold. A decline in the number of flights and passengers since the Sept.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2001 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new Orange County venture-capital fund, launched six months ago during the technology slump, is expected to announce today that it has raised $62 million to invest in fledgling Southern California technology companies. Although Miramar Venture Capital's effort to secure funding has taken months longer than anticipated and fallen short of its initial $100-million goal, the founding partners still declared the effort a success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2001 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $1.5-million federal grant that one community college district rejected is about to be scooped up by another Orange County district to encourage the development of new businesses. The grant from the U.S. Commerce Department will help the Rancho Santiago Community College District build a business incubator for digital-imaging companies. It probably will be built in Orange at Santiago Canyon College, one of the two main campuses in the district, the other being Santa Ana College.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2001
These companies and/or individuals recently filed for liquidation (Chapter 7) or reorganization (Chapter 11 or 13) in federal Bankruptcy Court in Santa Ana. Petitioner: James Patrick Coyne Jr. Location: Sunset Beach Listed business affiliation: JP Enterprises Type of business: NA Filing: Chapter 7 Assets: $3,850 Liabilities: $47,623 Case number: 13599 RA Petition signed by: James Patrick Coyne, Jr. Date filed: April 26 Petitioner: WilburGroup Inc., d.b.a. Creative Works, d.b.a.
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Come in. Busquelo aqui. Look for it here. Want to buy a computer and software? Busquelo aqui. Want to learn to use your computer or surf the Internet or navigate Windows? Busquelo aqui. Want to practice in Spanish or English or both? Busquelo aqui. Here, inside this unique store in downtown Santa Ana--the one that moonlights as an after-school lab for children and a meeting place for computer-hungry immigrants--Latinos are gathering by the hundreds. Busqueloaqui.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once it was the hub of South County, the place people went to shop, dine, spend a night on the town. Now, 30 years later, the once-bustling strip of El Toro Road just north of Interstate 5 has been abandoned by merchants and customers alike. Stop-and-go traffic. Empty storefronts dotting strip mall after strip mall.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | HERMAN WONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only 2:30 on this Thursday afternoon outside the John Wayne Airport terminal, but the 12 taxicabs parked across the street were idle and empty. To Tony Giannicchi, who mans the Yellow Cab "starter" booth as point man for the lineup of taxis at the airport, the lulls in customers this day seemed longer than usual. Even for Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1995 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To some, the Little Shrimp is the gay community's answer to Cheers, that comfy, inviting bar on the television show--a place, as the song goes, where everybody knows your name. Or, for those who prefer namelessness--well, that's OK too. But after three decades in business, the aging landmark at South Coast Highway and Cress Street will close Monday night, partly because of a dispute between the business and property owners over who should pay to repair a sagging kitchen floor.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|