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NEWS
February 7, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shoppers who walked into Grocery No. 70 a month ago usually found nothing but "emptiness," recalls Galina A. Polyanskaya, the store's director. "If you came early in the morning and stayed until late at night, you probably would have seen some product--a small quantity of sausage or milk--delivered," she said. "But within an hour and a half, it would have been sold, and the shelves would be empty again."
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NEWS
February 16, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty years ago, Yuri Belousov reported to work at the Chemical Fibers Plant in this Moscow suburb, eager to give himself to the kollective to help build the bright future promised by the Communist regime. Now his 25-year-old son, Alexei, who believes that he alone is the master of his future, is trying to buy part of the same factory. "I don't want to earn an hourly wage; I want to get a percentage of the profits. I want something of my own.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1993 | PATRICK LEE and SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When tanks loyal to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin attacked the Parliament building in Moscow on Monday, California businessman Paul E. Tatum could see the glow of flames and hear the report of machine guns from his window a kilometer away. But Tatum, who is a principal in a joint-venture hotel and business center not far from the Russian White House, saw the fighting not as the latest crisis for U.S. investors in the beleaguered nation, but rather as their best opportunity.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1999 | Bloomberg News
IKEA said it will open its first Russian store in Moscow in March, and it approved a site for a second Moscow store after the government agreed to reduce customs duties. Months of negotiations over the duties stalled IKEA's operations in Russia until it persuaded the government in August to cut duties. The privately held home furnishings retailer plans to open the $40-million store in northern Moscow on March 22, five months later than planned.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a familiar sight in Russia these days: the nervous businessman in his tailored lilac jacket, with a mobile phone over his ear and an emaciated beauty on his arm--and a pack of beefy bodyguards at his back. Private security has become one of Russia's biggest growth industries. Menacing men with guns are the brawn behind the brains of these operations.
NEWS
July 29, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an odd Kremlin meeting that was both a scolding and a pep talk, President Vladimir V. Putin tried to patch up relations with Russia's captains of industry Friday, exhorting them to support his economic program and stop using their media outlets to "politicize" legal actions against big business. Arrayed around an enormous table in an ornate Kremlin hall, 21 business leaders listened impassively as Putin tried to put to rest concerns that he had launched a war against them.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Its color changes by season from cloudy gray to milk chocolate. On good days, the smell of manure is overpowered by the scent of bleach. And it tastes so strongly of chemicals needed to kill its pollutants that drinking Moscow's tap water is often likened to taking a gulp from a swimming pool. But its appearance, odor and taste have opened one of the most promising markets on the city's new capitalist horizon, by giving birth to a bottled-water industry that is enjoying astounding success.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1997 | Baltimore Sun
The Communists who ran Russia for more than 70 years regarded advertising with such suspicion that they banned the word. But today, advertising is everywhere. With dizzying speed, the signs exhorting "Glory to the Communist Party" have disappeared from the cornices of big buildings, along with the inspiring "Siberia is the Lungs of the Soviet Union."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1992 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Evgueny Fominykh is one of Russia's newest perestroika pioneers--the PR man. His boot camp is West Hollywood's City Hall. Public relations is a largely untried concept back home, where company promotional items typically consist of souvenir calendars, and where service with a smile has never been what you would call a national credo.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life in the New Russia is hard on Yelena Vorsina. Her monthly salary--the equivalent of $122--is three months overdue, and last payday she received only $40. Adding to her misery, she must cough up 12% of her meager income in taxes. She and her co-workers threatened to strike but realized they would be severely punished. Instead, she planted vegetables to feed her family. "It is impossible to live, but what can you do?" asked the 35-year-old mother of two.
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