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BUSINESS
September 18, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to bolster its reputation worldwide, UC Irvine named international business expert David H. Blake as the new dean of its Graduate School of Management. Blake, former dean of Southern Methodist University's business school, was identified in June as one of three front-runners for the job. He will start Oct. 1, replacing longtime management school dean Dennis Aigner. Though the management school is not the university's largest, the appointment was considered important.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2002 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trustees of Concordia University voted unanimously Friday to upgrade its business programs into a separate school at the Irvine campus. "It's going to have a significant impact on Concordia because it will elevate our business programs to a much higher status of visibility and status within the university," said Jack Preus, Concordia's president. There are 187 undergraduate business students at the Lutheran school and 50 in the master of business administration program.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2000 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Men far outnumber women at top business schools because these schools don't do enough to reach out to women and they create a less-than-friendly environment for those who do enroll, according to a study released Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2002 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Graduate School of Management's ranking falling and faculty complaining about management and fund-raising, UC Irvine has decided not to renew the contract of its dean of four years, David Blake. Ten of the school's 20 full professors signed a letter to the administration expressing their dissatisfaction with Blake's leadership. In an e-mail to faculty last month announcing the administration's decision, Blake acknowledged the role professors played in his ouster.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
RemedyTemp Inc. founder and chairman Robert E. McDonough Sr., who fell "in love at first sight" with Georgetown University when he first stepped onto its campus half a century ago, on Wednesday donated $30 million to its business school. The gift, which will be paid in installments over several years, is the largest the school has ever received, and the third-largest amount ever given to an American business school.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1996 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You're an Australian manufacturing expert. You've been parachuted into your company's money-losing sock factory in China. You don't speak Chinese, the factory's computer data has been wiped clean, and you are so swamped with technical problems that you can't get any sleep. What to do? This is the kind of case study Harvard Business School students have been presented with for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Loyola Marymount University's plan to expand its Westchester campus onto open bluffs overlooking Marina del Rey won approval from the Los Angeles City Council this week, ending nearly a decade of debate over the proposal. The council on Tuesday rejected protests from a group of die-hard opponents and unanimously agreed to let the private, Jesuit university build dormitories, a business school, a 1,000-seat theater and an athletic field on land zoned for single-family homes.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2006 | From Associated Press
Business schools are getting a lesson in supply and demand when it comes to teachers. The schools have been competing for students for years as the number of master in business administration programs at universities has soared. Now, the schools also are competing for a dwindling supply of doctoral business faculty to teach those students.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1999 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCLA will announce today that it has selected former H.F. Ahmanson & Co. President Bruce G. Willison as the new dean of its business school, making him the latest prize in an effort by colleges to recruit leaders from the boardroom instead of the classroom.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2008 | Laurie Goering, Tribune foreign correspondent
When Aarti Kothari decided she needed a top-quality business education to further her career, her choices at first weren't encouraging. In a country suffering a dramatic shortage of placements for college students, the nation's best business school, the Indian Institute of Management, had more than a hundred applicants for each seat. Lesser programs, strapped for resources, offered degrees of questionable value.
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