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BUSINESS
September 19, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK - Five years after Lehman Bros.' implosion, USC wants to make sure its newly minted accountants won't help blow up the world economy. Required courses at the university's Marshall School of Business now include accounting ethics. Another new course on accounting rules aims to help future auditors keep land mines, such as toxic investments linked to subprime mortgages, from exploding. The hope is that future auditors will protect society from market meltdowns like the one in 2008, not just act as dutiful Wall Street bookkeepers.
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OPINION
March 26, 2014 | Doyle McManus
President Obama is scheduled to visit Pope Francis at the Vatican on Thursday, and the meeting will probably take the usual form of encounters between presidents and pontiffs: a polite conversation about their common agenda on poverty and world peace, plus a gentle remonstrance from the Holy Father on abortion and religious liberty. But if Obama and Francis had time to get to know each other, they might each benefit by trading notes on practical politics, as presidents and British prime ministers often do, and on the lessons they can draw from each other's experiences.
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BUSINESS
October 2, 2011 | By Morgen Wenzel
Business schools are under the microscope again, their relevance and value questioned in many quarters. The financial crisis has triggered a self-examination of their raison d'etre. However, before we can decide whether and how business schools need to change, it is worth pausing to consider how and why business schools have evolved as they have. FOR THE RECORD: Business book review: A review in the Oct. 2 Business section of the book "The Roots, Rituals and Rhetorics of Change: North American Business Schools After the Second World War" misspelled the last name of reviewer Morgen Witzel as Wenzel.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK - Five years after Lehman Bros.' implosion, USC wants to make sure its newly minted accountants won't help blow up the world economy. Required courses at the university's Marshall School of Business now include accounting ethics. Another new course on accounting rules aims to help future auditors keep land mines, such as toxic investments linked to subprime mortgages, from exploding. The hope is that future auditors will protect society from market meltdowns like the one in 2008, not just act as dutiful Wall Street bookkeepers.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, John O'Dell covers major Orange County corporations and manufacturing for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-5831 and at john.odell@latimes.com
Oops! We mentioned several weeks ago that the UCI Graduate School of Business had been ranked 28th among the top 50 business schools by Britain's Financial Times, and we listed the other California business schools in the ranking. Except Stanford University, which ranked third in the U.S. and first in California.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2000
UC Irvine's School of Graduate Management remains on Business Week magazine's list of the Top 50 business schools in the country. UCI first made the list in 1998 and repeated in 1999. Business Week's latest list was released Wednesday. Only the top 30 schools are ranked individually, and UCI was not among them. It appeared on a list of 20 second-tier schools. Pennsylvania, Northwestern and Harvard topped the rankings. Other California business schools on the list included Stanford (No.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | DANIEL AKST
When William A. Hasler left KPMG Peat Marwick in New York to take a new job in California, he took a big pay cut. Worse yet, his new salary of $150,000 is exceeded by the monthly losses on his vacant house in Greenwich, Conn., which no one seems to want to buy. Basically, Hasler now works for free. What a dubious business decision--especially for someone whose new job is heading UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business. It's not as bad as it looks.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1988 | Associated Press
The most detailed assessment of the nation's business schools in nearly 30 years found widespread complacency, poor planning and a lack of contact with the business world. But the 372-page report, released Monday at a national convention of business schools, drew immediate fire from deans and corporate officials who said the report didn't go far enough in addressing social and ethical issues, including minority recruitment.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1990 | From Associated Press
Northwestern University's business school placed first for the second consecutive year in a new survey by Business Week magazine. In its Oct. 29 issue, the magazine said Northwestern's J. L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management in Evanston, Ill., received the highest rating from the 6,000 business school graduates and 322 corporate recruiters surveyed.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2006 | Stuart Silverstein and Juliet Chung, Times Staff Writers
USC announced Thursday the abrupt resignation of its business dean, Yash Gupta, who came to the school after a nationwide search 19 months ago. Gupta's departure comes slightly more than two weeks after it was disclosed that he was a finalist for the presidency of the University of Arizona -- a position he didn't win. It also followed a recent sharp drop in a ranking by the Financial Times of the overall MBA program at USC's business school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
A rise in the number of copper wire thefts in Long Beach prompted police to send a warning to local businesses. Since January, at least 74 thefts of copper wire have been reported in the city, according to the Long Beach Police Department. Schools, city parks, and commercial and private businesses are among the targets. The department suggested ways for businesses to prevent thefts, including installing security alarms and surveillance cameras, securing electrical or utility boxes and checking vacant property regularly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
A rise in the number of copper wire thefts in Long Beach prompted police to send a warning to local businesses this week. Since January, at least 74 thefts of copper wire have been reported in the city, according to the Long Beach Police Department. Schools, city parks and commercial and private businesses are among the targets. In a release Friday, the department suggested ways for businesses to combat the issue, including installing security alarms and surveillance cameras, securing electrical or utility boxes and checking vacant property regularly.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
Decades ago, many workers spent their whole lives at the same job, retiring with a full pension, and maybe even a gold watch from their boss. Now, almost no one works at the same place for life, and there's much less loyalty between employers and employees. But these changes didn't happen overnight. Although the recession accelerated them, the workplace began changing decades ago, experts say. In the 1970s, companies had lifetime employment models and long-term plans for developing talent internally and honing good employees for life.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Sophia Amoruso doesn't care if you're offended by the name of her company. "If it's a big shock when you hear it," she says, "you're probably not our customer anyway. " She's earned the right to be dismissive. Amoruso, 28, is the founder and chief executive of Nasty Gal, a fast-rising e-commerce site that has managed to keep a low profile despite a cult following of young women who can't get enough of the company's edgy and provocative clothing. Sales rocketed 10,160% from 2008 to 2011, making Nasty Gal the fastest-growing company in Los Angeles and the fastest-growing retail company period, at least according to the Inc. 5000 list released this month.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | By Andrew Hill
Clayton Christensen achieves the difficult feat of being at once imposing and humble. When I visited him last autumn at Harvard Business School, he laid out with quiet authority his latest thoughts on disruptive technology, the concept that justly made him famous in the mid-1990s. But he also took time to chat about his son's college basketball team, a poster of which hangs on one wall of an office full of family photos and memorabilia. Although he places great value on his family and faith — he is a devout Mormon — his research and teaching have dominated his public story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2012
Fred Milano Doo-wop singer with Dion and the Belmonts Fred Milano, 72, a singer who made rock 'n' roll history on doo-wop hits with Dion and the Belmonts in the 1950s, died Sunday, three weeks after his lung cancer was diagnosed, said Warren Gradus, who joined the vocal group in 1963. Milano lived in Massapequa, on New York's Long Island, and died in a hospital, Gradus said. Milano and his friends Angelo D'Aleo and Carlo Mastrangelo from the Bronx formed the Belmonts in the mid-1950s, borrowing their name from the borough's Belmont Avenue.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2002 | James Flanigan
The tech sector is in a terrible slump. After a string of headline-grabbing scandals, the world of high finance has been reduced to fodder for late-night TV comedy monologues. So what is UC San Diego doing? It's starting a business school to prepare students for management in a technology-based economy. The timing may seem curious, but UC San Diego is on to something.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Former Blockbuster Entertainment Corp. President Joseph Baczko on Wednesday was named dean of Pace University's Lubin School of Business in New York. Baczko, 59, whose executive experience spans the nursery, video and toy industries, said in a release that he hoped his international business experience would contribute to the development of competitive educational programs at the school. The 40-year-old business school has 5,100 undergraduate, graduate and professional students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
An armed man fatally shot by UC Berkeley police this week was a 32-year-old student at the university, officials said Wednesday. Investigators were looking into reports that the man, identified as Christopher Travis, had demonstrated erratic behavior in the past, including possible suicide attempts. Travis, an undergraduate who transferred to the UC Berkeley business school this fall, died of his wounds at a hospital, officials said. He was shot by a campus police officer in the school's computer lab Tuesday afternoon after Travis pointed a loaded handgun at officers and refused orders to drop the weapon, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Stanford University's Graduate School of Business has been given $150 million by an alumnus and his wife to establish an institute dedicated to helping developing economies and reducing poverty around the world. The gift, which the university will announce Friday, is from Robert King, who earned a master's degree in business administration from in 1960 and became a successful Silicon Valley investor, and his wife, Dorothy. University officials described it as the second largest single publicly disclosed gift to Stanford, topped only by a $400-million donation from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in 2001.
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