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BUSINESS
October 15, 1997
Commercial real estate is essential to commerce and a key indicator of our economic health. It touches virtually all of us, from the design and location of the buildings we work in to the investment returns we earn on the many pension and mutual funds that own commercial property. Every Wednesday starting today, the Business section will publish special pages devoted to the people, trends and innovations that make commercial real estate in Southern California relevant and important.
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NEWS
August 8, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a dramatic setback for business, the South Coast Air Quality Management District on Friday soundly rejected a series of controversial proposals to reduce the costs to business of fighting smog.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1992 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nonprofit groups dependent on corporate donations got some bad--albeit not totally unexpected--news Monday: Corporate giving in Southern California remains languid and has not kept pace with inflation or other charitable giving. A survey of members of the Los Angeles-based Southern California Assn. of Philanthropy showed that corporate giving in 1990 accounted for just 29% of total member giving--the smallest share since the group began polling its members in 1985.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1992 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Bill Clinton is focused like a laser beam on the nation's economy, not its ecology, one thing is clear: It won't be business as usual when it comes to environmental regulations and enforcement, a prospect that has Southern California's industrial leaders and developers a bit unnerved.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
More than two dozen major business groups in Southern California have launched a campaign against an ambitious proposal to fight smog by trading pollution credits, contending it will substantially raise the cost of cleaning the air rather than lower it as promised. The barrage of criticism, led by the Gas Co.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD and JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than a third of the Southland's largest employers expect to relocate their facilities or expand at new sites within the next two years--and of those, one in four say that the new location will be outside of Southern California, according to a new survey. For those looking to move out of the area, Mexico is the most popular destination, selected by 12% who say they will go outside Los Angeles County, 9% looking outside San Diego County and 8% looking outside Orange County.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1993 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Feliz Navidad, Happy Kwanzaa, Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Akemashite Omedeto Gozaimasu --holiday messages vary in the polyglot Southland, but it all means "Seasons Greetings" . . . and sales for the region's retailers. For example, Las Posadas--the nine-day observance that re-creates Mary and Joseph's search for shelter on Christmas Eve--generates festive spirits and crowds for Olvera Street merchants and other Los Angeles businesses that cater to the Latino market.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1993 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it a renewed sense of hope, or call it a feeling that things couldn't possibly get worse. Whichever, Orange County's business community expressed some optimism about 1993 in a survey commissioned by Thomas Temporaries in Irvine. Of the 204 executives interviewed here, 21% said they plan to hire this year, while only 9% foresee staff cuts. Last year, the same survey showed that 18% of Orange County companies responding expected employment increases, offset by 17% who feared payroll slashes.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1993 | HELAINE OLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the irritation of pet owners, 1993 is shaping up as one of Southern California's worst flea seasons in memory. That means business is jumping for those who provide flea relief, especially companies that advertise environmentally safe solutions. Pet stores, veterinarians, groomers and exterminators say revenue from flea treatments and products is even higher than last year, which also produced a bumper crop of insects.
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