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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1988 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Catholic Relief Services has received a $5-million matching grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development to support the creation of small businesses in Third World countries. Catholic Relief Services officials said the grant will fund the agency's work in five countries on three continents by enabling entrepreneurs to build small businesses--"the bricklayers, shopkeepers and landless farmers," according to one staff member.
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BUSINESS
August 11, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lineup of defendants in Argentina's politically charged IBM scandal resembles the guest list for an exclusive gathering of the financial and governmental elite. The 30 defendants include ousted top executives of IBM Argentina, the entire former board of directors of state-owned Banco de la Nacion, Argentina's largest bank, and a former aide to the nation's president.
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NEWS
June 5, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's a case study that won't make the curriculum at Harvard Business School: A novice executive at a foreign-owned factory here arrived to find his 200 workers lined up outside the gates, refusing to go in. It seems a witch doctor had cast a spell on the grounds by cutting off a chicken head and spraying its blood around the entrance. The executive put through a panicky call to John Moore, an American who had been running a neighboring steel fabricating plant for six years.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's a case study that won't make the curriculum at Harvard Business School: A novice executive at a foreign-owned factory here arrived to find his 200 workers lined up outside the gates, refusing to go in. It seems a witch doctor had cast a spell on the grounds by cutting off a chicken head and spraying its blood around the entrance. The executive put through a panicky call to John Moore, an American who had been running a neighboring steel fabricating plant for six years.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lineup of defendants in Argentina's politically charged IBM scandal resembles the guest list for an exclusive gathering of the financial and governmental elite. The 30 defendants include ousted top executives of IBM Argentina, the entire former board of directors of state-owned Banco de la Nacion, Argentina's largest bank, and a former aide to the nation's president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1987
Your article (March 24), "Africa's Tiny Shops Thrive Amid Poverty," was a welcome signal that micro-enterprise (small business of one-to-five people) in developing nations is not only a good idea, it also exists and is growing rapidly. Congress is presently considering a piece of legislation, HR 910, the Self-Sufficiency for the Poor Act of 1987, which would facilitate loans to just such people as those represented in your article--the very poorest segment of the world's population.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1987
I read with interest Robert B. Reich's Dec. 6 column, "Short-Term Fixes Won't Solve Long-Term Woes." He is right in his assessment of our current economic problems. Certainly, U.S. business has done little to help bring about a stronger national economy. With increased government acquiescence, it has severely weakened it. We complain about decaying steel companies and other manufacturing concerns without realizing that corporate America has sold out, moving business to Third World countries, moving out jobs, money and, in many cases, a community's lifeblood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2000
A congressional commission last week recommended radical changes in the operation and functions of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, opening a discussion that is long overdue. Half a century old, both institutions have strayed from their original goals, wasted billions on ill-conceived loans and failed to adjust to dramatic changes in the global economy. Congress cannot directly order reforms of either international body, but the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1990 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
I was driving southeast from Shannon last week and it wasn't hard to figure out why the world trade talks in Brussels were foundering. Coming into Mitchelstown, on the border of counties Cork and Tipperary, the car slowed to a crawl behind big creamery lorries heading into the dairy cooperative. Farther south and east into county Waterford, the going was quicker, roads mostly empty between the patchwork of fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1988 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Catholic Relief Services has received a $5-million matching grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development to support the creation of small businesses in Third World countries. Catholic Relief Services officials said the grant will fund the agency's work in five countries on three continents by enabling entrepreneurs to build small businesses--"the bricklayers, shopkeepers and landless farmers," according to one staff member.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1987
Your article (March 24), "Africa's Tiny Shops Thrive Amid Poverty," was a welcome signal that micro-enterprise (small business of one-to-five people) in developing nations is not only a good idea, it also exists and is growing rapidly. Congress is presently considering a piece of legislation, HR 910, the Self-Sufficiency for the Poor Act of 1987, which would facilitate loans to just such people as those represented in your article--the very poorest segment of the world's population.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Michael Bolton was named top pop male vocalist over the late Roy Orbison, the evening's sentimental favorite, and Linda Ronstadt and Aaron Neville were cited for best vocal by a pop duo as the 32nd Annual Grammy Awards telecast got under way Wednesday evening at the Shrine Auditorium. Jazz great Miles Davis was certain of one award even before the three-hour CBS program began.
OPINION
February 5, 1989 | Kevin Phillips, Kevin Phillips is publisher of the American Political Report and Business and Public Affairs Fortnightly
When Japan began to overtake the United States as the West's leading financial power in the 1980s, Americans consoled themselves that U.S. military and defense-industry leadership, at least, was undisputed. Japan and West Germany couldn't challenge us there. Not with the constraining memories of World War II--of Messerschmitts over the white cliffs of Dover and Mitsubishis over Corregidor.
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