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Business United States

NEWS
December 15, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drenched by downpours, Guillermo de la Vina wandered the agricultural outposts of Oregon and Washington in a thin raincoat and polished shoes, courting immigrant owners of small markets and stores. The businesses were rundown, planted in the mud of one-street towns. But De la Vina knew they could be gatekeepers for billions of dollars that Mexican migrant workers send home yearly.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The real story in this election for business is that a lot of money will be pumped into the U.S. economy in the next four years, no matter who wins. Whether through the broad tax cuts promised for a George W. Bush administration or the directed tax credits, deductions and grants of an Al Gore administration, the federal government will disburse an estimated $300 billion to $500 billion into the economy between 2001 and 2004. The government can well afford it.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2000 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Europe's antitrust brain trust had no sooner whittled the AOL-Time Warner merger down to size this month than it opened an investigation into Visa, the credit card giant. Before that was the WorldCom-Sprint merger deal, which the Europeans unraveled; Microsoft's would-be takeover of a British cable operator, Telewest, which they effectively blocked; and the Boeing-McDonnell Douglas marriage, whose dowry was partially dismantled.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
Maria Cantwell, the Democratic Senate candidate in Washington, made a fortune at an Internet company she joined after she was swept from the U.S. House of Representatives during the Republican landslide in 1994. If she wins her challenge against veteran Republican Sen. Slade Gorton, the 42-year-old Cantwell will be the first senator with real roots in the computer and communications revolution transforming the American workplace.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Dozens of America's most profitable companies enjoyed tax-free years during the 1990s largely because of legal tax breaks, an independent study released Thursday found. The report by the nonprofit Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy found that 250 companies paid an effective tax rate of 20.1% in 1998, down from 22.9% just two years before. The federal income tax rate for corporations is supposed to be 35%.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2000 | From Reuters
Shell-shocked investors, already hit by a series of profit warnings from major U.S. companies in recent weeks, should brace for more bad news to come, analysts said. When much of corporate America reports third-quarter results over the next month, the main focus is likely to be the outlook for profitability in the fourth quarter and into 2001.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2000 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An innovative experiment by the Japanese government to unlock the secret of America's entrepreneurial energies has gotten off to a rocky start. By placing a handful of their most promising high-tech start-ups in American business incubators for several years of intensive parenting, the Japanese hoped to pick up some tips on high-tech nurturing and, with luck, grow the world's next technology giant-killer.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of companies prosecuted or sued for defrauding the government can still receive federal business--and many have gotten new contracts--because agencies chose not to ban them, a computer analysis shows. The companies include a Texas contractor convicted of selling faulty Coast Guard windshields and an environmental cleanup company convicted of bribery.
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