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BUSINESS
July 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of companies prosecuted or sued for defrauding the government can still receive federal business--and many have gotten new contracts--because agencies chose not to ban them, a computer analysis shows. The companies include a Texas contractor convicted of selling faulty Coast Guard windshields and an environmental cleanup company convicted of bribery.
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BUSINESS
July 20, 2000 | HANS GREIMEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Europe is the world's hot spot for mergers and acquisitions, led by Britain, which unseated the United States for first place in buying out foreign companies last year, an economic policy group reports. Worldwide, the number of cross-border mergers jumped 50% to just more than 5,000 in 1999, with nearly three-quarters of the deals in Europe, according to the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
NEWS
July 5, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Don't look now, but over the past six weeks, we've quietly entered a new era for U.S. foreign policy. A decade after the end of the Cold War, we now have the Corporate Peace. Since mid-May, the American business community has won a breathtaking series of victories in Washington, stripping away the sanctions that have somewhat limited its overseas operations.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Merger activity among U.S. companies continued to slow in the second quarter, as rising interest rates and falling stock prices hampered potential acquirors. The number of announced deals totaled 2,210 in the quarter, down 22% from the second quarter of 1999, according to figures from Thomson Financial Securities Data. The dollar volume of deals announced fell to $323 billion from $477 billion a year earlier, a 32% decline.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
A U.S. law enforcement official confirmed reports that the U.S. Justice Department is investigating whether a U.S. financial consultant improperly funneled tens of millions of dollars from major oil companies to Kazakh President Nursultan A. Nazarbayev and other leaders of the oil-rich former Soviet republic. Exxon Mobil Corp.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2000 | From Reuters
The FBI is investigating whether a U.S. businessman illegally funneled $35 million from three oil companies to high-ranking Kazakhstan officials, including President Nursultan Nazarbayev, Newsweek reported Sunday. The investigation comes as the United States, Russia and Iran vie to win Kazakh approval for competing oil-export routes for the former Soviet republic's potentially vast oil reserves.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two powerhouse Latino developers are launching a national nonprofit entity that aims to build Latino community wealth by financing franchises for first-time entrepreneurs. The effort--Latino Initiatives for the Next Century (LINC)--will be unveiled in Washington Wednesday.
NEWS
June 15, 2000 | ASHLEY DUNN and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid the din of million-dollar parties and free employee BMWs that have come to define the excesses of the "dot-com" era, the quiet voice of frugality is being heard. Fiscal reason has been an oxymoron in high-tech centers around the country since the dawning of the "new economy." With billions of dollars being thrown around, spending big was an easy way to get attention and seem successful.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's ruling that Microsoft Corp. must be split up is not only good for the future of technology and the U.S. economy. It could be the best medicine for Microsoft too. Why? Because splitting Microsoft could energize parts of today's company and let talented people range widely to develop applications for office and home software rather than constantly trying to control the marketplace through Microsoft's Windows operating system.
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