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February 17, 2014 | By David Horsey
Especially when it comes to economic policy, too many politicians are motivated by myths more than by facts. A prime example: the myth of the job creators. Republicans, such as Speaker of the House John Boehner, talk of job creators in reverent, worshipful terms. In their vision of how the world works, it is these brave titans of capitalism who, with no help from anyone else, build the companies that create jobs for American workers. To Boehner and his party, anything that inhibits job creators in their endeavors - taxes, environmental laws, financial regulations - is a job killer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Saturday night is fight night, with the highly anticipated rematch between Manny Pacquiao and Timothy Bradley set to be broadcast on big screens across the nation. As thousands of fans traipse into bars and restaurants to catch the big fight, a small army of corporate detectives will be lurking in the background, hoping to catch something else. Paid by the promoters of the closed-circuit televised event, these sleuths will be on the lookout for bar owners who show the Pacquiao-Bradley fight without paying the commercial rate, which dwarfs the fee to watch in your living room.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Restaurants, mom-and-pop shops and other small businesses often face an abundance of frustrating complications during start-up - construction delays and supply shortages being among the top obstacles. Now, managing online presence is joining the headache-inducing list. With more consumers relying on the Internet to decide where to eat and shop, setting up a website and social media accounts, responding to reviews on websites such as Yelp and weighing the purchase of online ads have become key factors in the success of a business - or its demise.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
For years, Republicans benefited from economic growth. So did pretty much everyone else, of course. But I have something specific in mind. Politically, when the economy is booming - or merely improving at a satisfactory clip - the distinction between being pro-business and pro-market is blurry. The distinction is also fuzzy when the economy is shrinking or imploding. But when the economy is simply limping along - not good, not disastrous - like it is now, the line is easier to see. And GOP politicians typically don't want to admit they see it. Just to clarify, the difference between being pro-business and pro-market is categorical.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
The California Homemade Food Act went into effect Jan. 1, which allows certain foods prepared in home kitchens, such as breads, granola, pies and jams, to be sold to restaurants, shops and directly to customers. Los Angeles residents looking to sell homemade goods can learn how to get their products on the market, in accordance with requirements and regulations, at a Craft Food Forum on Sunday at 3 p.m. The event will be held at California State Fullerton's Grand Central Art Center where KCRW Good Food host Evan Kleiman and the Orange County Department of Health will discuss the new law and important implementations, such as inspections and product labeling, so those wanting to finally launch a business selling homemade foods -- now that it's legal -- can do so successfully.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2013 | By Shan Li
Outspoken California Gov. Jerry Brown has roundly dismissed radio ads by Texas Gov. Rick Perry that slam the Golden State's business environment. "It's not a serious story, guys," Brown told reporters at a Tuesday business event. The radio spots voiced by Perry, who has tried before to woo California businesses to the Lone Star State, starts out with the Texas governor proclaiming that "building a business is tough, but I hear building a business in California is next to impossible.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Stefan Stern
All companies sit somewhere in a supply chain. Most have competitors and collaborators. And yet we look at businesses very often in isolation - as if their results depend solely on their own separate efforts. The principal achievement of the book "Network Advantage: How to Unlock Value From Your Alliances and Partnerships" is to draw attention to the importance of these broader networks to the success or failure of businesses. With detailed and thoroughly researched case studies, the authors - Henrich Greve and Andrew Shipilov of INSEAD global graduate business school and Timothy Rowley of the Rotman School of Management in Toronto - show how to take a more systematic approach to the portfolio of networks and alliances in which businesses find themselves.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento A dozen companies committed to maximizing social good while turning a profit have filed papers with the state to become California's first "benefit corporations. " Chief executives, led by Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia Inc., a maker and seller of outdoor apparel and equipment, marched into the secretary of state's office in Sacramento shortly after it opened Tuesday morning. It was the first business day they could register under a recently approved state law that gives companies a way to legally structure their businesses to consider social and environmental efforts as part of their missions.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration is unveiling a slate of regulatory changes it says will cut government red tape and save businesses more than $10 billion over the next five years — and, the White House hopes, bolster its effort to promote job and economic growth. The plan includes about 500 changes aimed at saving businesses money in a variety of ways, such as consolidating their IRS paperwork, simplifying hazard warnings they must post for workers, and expediting payment to government contractors.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The Better Business Bureau, which has been under fire for boosting the ratings of businesses that became dues-paying members, said Thursday that it would alter its rating process. "For nearly 100 years, the BBB has stood for public trust, and we are taking these steps to maintain that trust," said Steve Cox, chief executive of the Council of Better Business Bureaus in Washington. "Given the feedback, we feel it is our duty to take immediate steps to address the concerns raised and enhance our ability to help consumers easily and quickly find trustworthy businesses," Cox said.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Adam Jones
Animation giant Pixar uses technology only as a means to an end; its films are rooted in human concerns, not computer wizardry. The same can be said of the new book "Creativity, Inc.," Ed Catmull's endearingly thoughtful explanation of how the studio he co-founded generated hits such as the "Toy Story" trilogy, "Up" and "Wall-E. " Catmull was a 1970s computer animation pioneer (university classmates included Netscape co-founder Jim Clark), but his book is not a technical history of how the hand-drawn artistry perfected by Disney was rendered obsolete by the processing power of machines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Turning the Cecil Hotel into homeless housing was supposed to be a quick and innovative way to get skid row residents off the streets. But a proposal for hundreds of homeless units in the hotel collapsed recently in the face of opposition from downtown business leaders and social service providers, backed by Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina. They argued the neighborhood is oversaturated with homeless housing and other services. "Supervisor Molina's strong opinion is that the skid row area is the way it is because of an over-concentration of services," Roxane Marquez, Molina's press deputy, said Friday.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | David Lazarus
Among the frequently asked questions on Yelp's website, there's this: "Will Yelp remove or reorder bad reviews if a business pays for sponsorship?" And the answer: "No. You can't pay us to remove or reorder your bad reviews - it's just that simple. " It's not that simple, at least if you listen to the many small-business owners who say Yelp routinely uses bad reviews and competitors' ads as leverage to get merchants to cough up some cash. "They continually harass you and strong-arm you to get you to pay for their service," said Randy Boelsems, 64, who runs a boating supply company in Fountain Valley.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
If you're against letting airline passengers talk on cellphones, you've gained a powerful ally. The Global Business Travel Assn., a trade group for the world's business travelers, submitted its opposition last week to a plan by the Federal Communications Commission to lift a ban on voice calls on planes. The group, which represents about 6,000 travel managers, called onboard calls "detrimental to business travelers. " The association even quoted folk singer Pete Seeger, who borrowed heavily from the book of Ecclesiastes when he wrote "there is a time to keep silence and a time to speak.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - The Senate confirmed Maria Contreras-Sweet, a former California official who founded a Los Angeles community bank, to head the federal Small Business Administration. Contreras-Sweet was approved Thursday by voice vote to the Cabinet position, which helps small businesses with loans and other assistance. She takes over for Karen Mills, a former venture capitalist who stepped down as the agency's administrator last year. President Obama said Contreras-Sweet "understands what it means to start a small business" and has "a proven track record of helping other small businesses succeed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Republican gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari unveiled a jobs plan Tuesday that calls for corporate tax breaks, hydraulic fracturing of some California oil deposits, reduced regulations on business and increased spending on water storage. The 10-point plan, focused on manufacturing, water, energy and the business climate, is the first policy Kashkari has set forth since announcing in January that he would run for office. The former U.S. Treasury official said his plan would "unleash" the private sector, creating hundreds of thousands of jobs.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2011 | By Eve Mitchell
When Oakland restaurateur Henry Vortriede needs more bread for his eatery, he doesn't have to spend cash to buy it. Instead, he turns to barter, an ancient form of commerce that is attracting new converts during a struggling economy. But Vortriede isn't restricted to bartering directly with a baker down the street in exchange for providing free meals at his Montclair Bistro. That's because the restaurant is among businesses that belong to fee-based online barter networks that make it possible to trade with many businesses.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2013 | By Shan Li
In another sign of a recovering economy, U.S. orders for machinery and factory goods jumped in January as businesses invested for future growth. The Commerce Department said U.S. companies upped their orders for such goods by 7.2% in January from the month before, the biggest jump in more than a year. Economists watch investment in capital goods as a sign of business confidence. Despite tax hikes and the threat of automatic spending cuts known as sequestration, the increases indicate that companies continued to raise production even after the holidays.
SPORTS
March 25, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
Steve Fisher, San Diego State's basketball coach, peered down from the high heaven of an NCAA news conference platform last Saturday and remarked, "This is a funny business we're in. " Fisher's words came after Xavier Thames had scored 53 points in 48 hours to lead the Aztecs out of an NCAA sub-regional in Spokane. It wasn't funny if you were trying to stop the senior known as "X," who was definitely a factor in giving a point-guard tutorial against New Mexico State and North Dakota State.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Veronica Rocha
A 53-year-old male transient from Santa Monica was arrested Thursday and booked on suspicion of attempted murder in connection with the stabbing of a woman on a busy street in Glendale, police said. Michael Caudill is being held in lieu of $1-million bail, Glendale police Sgt. Tom Lorenz said. The woman, who hasn't been identified by police, suffered a non-life-threatening stab wound to her upper torso and was taken to a hospital for treatment, he said. Police received numerous 911 calls from witnesses about the stabbing just before 10:30 a.m. at San Fernando Road and Pacific Avenue.
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