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FOOD
February 11, 2010
Momofuku's Crack Pie Total time: 1 1/2 hours, plus cooling and chilling times Servings: Makes 2 pies (6 to 8 servings each) Note: Adapted from Momofuku. This pie calls for 2 (10-inch) pie tins. You can substitute 9-inch pie tins, but note that the pies will require additional baking time, about 5 minutes, due to the increased thickness of the filling. Cookie for crust 2/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon (3 ounces) flour Scant 1/8 teaspoon baking powder Scant 1/8 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup (1 stick)
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FOOD
April 23, 2014
Total time: 1 hour, 35 minutes, plus 1 hour, 30 minutes rising time Servings: 8 Note: From Chef Hayden Ramsey of Square One restaurant in L.A. Nielsen-Massey vanilla paste can be purchased at Surfas in Culver City, Sur La Table and Williams-Sonoma stores. European-style butter is available at Trader Joe's, Bristol Farms and Whole Foods markets. The chef toasts a cinnamon stick, then grinds it for this recipe. 1 ( 1/4 ounce) package dry yeast 1/3 cup plus 3 tablespoons sugar, divided 1/2 cup milk 2 cups flour, divided 2 eggs 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided 3/4 cup European-style butter, chilled, divided 1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed 1/4 teaspoon vanilla paste or substitute 1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup raw, unsalted pecan pieces 1. For the cake, combine the yeast and one-third cup sugar in a mixing bowl.
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HEALTH
March 27, 2011 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Love fries but hate the thought of artery-clogging fried food? A growing number of gourmet restaurants and foodies see a solution to this conundrum in an unlikely source ? duck fat. They consider it a healthy alternative to frying foods in pork fat, beef fat or even butter. Duck fat is high in beneficial unsaturated fats, and its chemical composition is closer to olive oil than to butter, they say. Plus, it's delicious. "I love it," said David Bazirgan, executive chef at the Fifth Floor restaurant in San Francisco.
FOOD
April 23, 2014
Total time: 20 to 30 minutes Servings: 4 4 slices rustic bread, about 1/2 inch thick 1 tablespoon clarified butter or olive oil 1 clove garlic, cut in half 6 eggs, at room temperature 2 tablespoons butter, divided 1/4 teaspoon salt Pinch of white pepper 4 slices prosciutto di Parma 1. Brush the bread slices with clarified butter or olive oil. Toast the bread in a large skillet over medium-high heat...
FOOD
October 21, 2009
  Butter monkey bread Total time: About 1 hour plus rising time Servings: 10 to 12 Note: Adapted from "The Best From Helen Corbitt's Kitchens" by Helen Corbitt. 1 prepared recipe dough 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, melted 1. Punch down the risen dough and turn it out onto a lightly floured work surface. Roll the dough into a rectangle one-fourth-inch thick. Using a pizza cutter or sharp knife, cut the dough into 1-by-2-inch rectangles.
FOOD
December 16, 2009
Total time: About 1 hour, plus chilling and cooling times Servings: Makes about 3 dozen sandwich cookies 1 cup (4 ounces) sifted flour 1/3 cup sugar 2/3 cup finely chopped pecans or hazelnuts 1/2 cup (1 stick) softened butter, plus 2 tablespoons butter, divided 1/3 cup sifted powdered sugar 1 ounce melted chocolate 1. In a large bowl, sift together the flour and sugar. Stir in the chopped nuts until evenly combined, then blend in one-half cup butter using a pastry blender.
FOOD
August 2, 2013
Total time: 1 hour, plus overnight chilling Servings: Makes about 5 1/2 dozen Note: From test kitchen director Donna Deane 1/2 cup pine nuts 2 1/2 cups flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup butter 1 1/4 cups confectioners sugar 1 egg 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped thyme 1 cup finely chopped dried apricots 1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Toast the pine nuts on a baking sheet in the oven for 5 to 7 minutes, or until very lightly browned.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
For many, clarified butter is the cooking fat of choice in the kitchen. It is butter where the milk solids, water and whey proteins have been removed. The resulting butter is a beautifully clear golden liquid when melted, preferred in many recipes because it can be cooked at higher temperatures than standard butter. (The milk solids in standard butter can easily burn.) Because it's clarified, this butter can also last longer -- the milk solids that can cause standard butter to go rancid so quickly have been removed.
FOOD
June 3, 2010
Maple brown butter glaze Total time: 20 minutes Servings: Makes about 2 cups glaze, enough to frost a batch of doughnuts Note: Grade B maple syrup is less filtered than Grade A, making for a more richly flavored syrup; it is generally available at most markets. 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons (3/4 stick) butter 1 pound powdered sugar, sifted 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3/4 cup maple syrup, preferably Grade B 1. In a small saucepan heated over medium-high heat, melt the butter and continue to cook until the butter browns, being careful not to burn . Remove from heat and set aside.
NEWS
December 7, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Flame retardant chemicals that are known to be harmful to health have been found in a package of butter sampled in a Dallas grocery story, according to a study published Tuesday. This is the first reported case of food contamination that is thought to have resulted from the chemicals used in the food packaging. The chemicals are polybrominated diphenyl ethers -- or PBDEs. The chemicals are commonly found in electronic devices, fabrics and insulation. PBDEs are known to be harmful to animals and are suspected of disrupting human thyroid hormones.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By David Pierson
For generations, butter got a bad rap. It was thought to be cloying, fattening, dangerous for your arteries, and it took a creaming from oil-based substitutes like margarine. Now with the trans fats in those alternatives under fire, everyone from iron chefs to home cooks is reexamining butter's place on the refrigerator shelf. The yellow spread served at Joan Hemphill's Seal Beach home tastes like butter - because it is butter. "I use way too much," Hemphill concedes.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By David Pierson
It turns out America's health fixation has been a boon for butter. Consumption of the creamy spread hit a 40-year high in the U.S. in 2012 as more Americans turned to natural foods and rejected products heavy in trans fats like margarine. “Consumers are changing their perception of food and looking for healthier alternatives. They're moving away from highly processed foods and artificial ingredients,” Anuja Miner, executive director of the American Butter Institute, said in a phone interview Tuesday.
FOOD
December 21, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
At this very moment my neighbor, Cassy, is awaiting delivery of a 100-year-old cider press she bought on eBay. She, like many of us, has apple fever. I made an apple galette at least twice this week. And I'm dreaming of the apple hand pies I used to buy in frosty weather from the famous bakery Poîlane on Rue du Cherche-Midi in Paris. But even if you don't bake, you can get in on the apple frenzy at restaurants and bakeries. Now that we've got pumpkin desserts out of the way, inspired bakers are turning their attention to apples.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Thanksgiving is just days away, and it's never too soon to start planning your menu! Food editor Russ Parsons and I will be demonstrating videos of classic dishes on the blog every couple of days to get you in the mood. We're beginning with a Test Kitchen favorite: pumpkin-thyme dinner rolls. This recipe, from food writer Regina Schrambling, is a reminder that a well-made roll is something special. Crisp on the outside but tender at the center, and terrific enough to have been named one of our best recipes of the year in 2002, they adapt easily to even the most crowded holiday schedule.
FOOD
November 2, 2013
Oysters Rockefeller 40 minutes, plus cooling time. 24 oysters About 5 tablespoons (2½ ounces) butter, divided, plus melted butter for drizzling over the oysters before baking Generous ¾ cup (3½ ounces) finely diced fennel 3/4 teaspoon minced garlic 1/3 cup Pernod About 12 loosely packed cups (11 1/3 ounces) cleaned spinach 1/2 teaspoon (2/3 ounce) sea salt 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons (scant 1½ ounces) heavy cream 24 medium oysters, preferably East Coast oysters with a deep cup, such as Naked Cowboys, Malpeque, Beau Soliel or Wellfleet About ½ cup fresh white bread crumbs 1. In a straight-sided sauté pan, melt 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat.
FOOD
November 2, 2013
 35 minutes, plus freezing time for the butter. 24 clams About 1¾ cups (3½ ounces) fresh white bread crumbs About 1 cup (2 2/3 ounces) panko bread crumbs 2 cups, loosely packed (1 ounce) parsley leaves (stemmed, washed and dried) 1 generous cup, loosely packed (½ ounce) basil leaves (stemmed, washed and dried) Scant ½ teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon chopped garlic 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons (5 ounces) butter, softened 24 middleneck clams (large littleneck clams can be substituted)
FOOD
November 2, 2013
 35 minutes, plus freezing time for the butter. 24 clams About 1¾ cups (3½ ounces) fresh white bread crumbs About 1 cup (2 2/3 ounces) panko bread crumbs 2 cups, loosely packed (1 ounce) parsley leaves (stemmed, washed and dried) 1 generous cup, loosely packed (½ ounce) basil leaves (stemmed, washed and dried) Scant ½ teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon chopped garlic 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons (5 ounces) butter, softened 24 middleneck clams (large littleneck clams can be substituted)
FOOD
October 17, 2007
  Total time: 1 hour, 20 minutes Servings: 6 to 8 Note: Use any high-quality country white bread such as pain rustique; you will need a loaf that weighs about a pound. Our recipes, your kitchen: If you try any of the L.A. Times Test Kitchen recipes from this week's Food section, please share it with us: Click here to upload pictures of the finished dish. 3 cups whole milk 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme 1 teaspoon chopped fresh sage 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup ( 1/2 stick)
FOOD
November 2, 2013 | By Michael Cimarusti
A pristine oyster on the half shell, unadorned, fresh, cold and briny, is a near-perfect thing. A properly shucked littleneck clam, alone, or with a drop or two of lemon and Tabasco, will make you say mmmm, every time. But just because these shellfish are so good raw doesn't mean we shouldn't cook them too. Properly cooked shellfish is a wonderful thing. The cooking intensifies and transforms the flavor. Oysters especially change completely when cooked, seeming rich and fatty in the best way, while in the raw state they are anything but. You've got to be careful when cooking either type of shellfish, though.
FOOD
November 2, 2013
30 minutes, plus cooling time. 24 oysters 2 tablespoons (generous 1 ounce) butter, divided, plus melted butter for drizzling over the oysters before baking Scant ¼ cup (scant 1 ounce) thinly sliced shallots 1/2 teaspoon dry English mustard powder 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon (2½ ounces) white wine Scant 2½ teaspoons (1/3 ounce) fresh-squeezed lemon juice 1/2 cup (4 ounces) heavy cream 1 1/2 tablespoons (1 ounce) Dijon mustard About 1/8 teaspoon sea salt 24 medium oysters, preferably East Coast oysters with a deep cup, such as Naked Cowboys, Malpeque, Beau Soliel or Wellfleet 1/4 cup fresh white bread crumbs 24 slices green onion, green parts only (cut on a bias as thin as you can, hold them in ice water)
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